first_img17Jan Rep. VanderWall attends State of the State Categories: VanderWall News,VanderWall Photos State Rep. Curt VanderWall, R-Ludington, is joined by his wife, Diane, to listen to the governor’s State of the State address on the House floor on Tuesday evening.###last_img

first_imgLorenz GlatzFormer Kabel Deutschland chief technology officer Lorenz Glatz has joined the board of data analytics specialist Guavus.The company said that Glatz’s appointment is part of its on-going commitment to advance progress for the cable industry, following its strategic investment injection from Liberty Global and the launch of the latest version of Guavus Service Reflex 3, its analytics engine that combines network operations, care operations and field operations.Guavus has also joined the SCTE Standards Programme, where it will collaborate and help shape the future of industry-wide standards for the deployment of network maintenance, service assurance and customer experience management solutions. The company will work with SCTE to ensure that big data analytics products and data assets are available to further initiatives such as the Energy 2020 programme, the Network Operations Subcommittee (NOS) and the Special Working Group on Readiness for DOCSIS 3.1.“I see tremendous promise in Guavus’ products. They have pioneered a new category of service operations analytics that allow enterprises to not only correlate the impact network events have on service quality, but to take action in real-time to positively affect customer experience. This holistic approach, which can be applied to virtually any industry, is exactly what businesses need to compete, grow and succeed in today’s rapidly changing market,” said Glatz.“We are fortunate to have a Board of Industry Advisors that are so effective and engaged and are now privileged to welcome Lorenz to the team,” said Anukool Lakhina, CEO and founder of Guavus.“His expertise and guidance will be instrumental as we continue to extend into new markets around the world and to pioneer new products that allow the cable industry to exceed customer expectations across multiple channels, increase profits and rapidly bring new offerings to market.”last_img read more

first_img Source:https://canal.ugr.es/noticia/obesity-and-food-restrictions-proven-to-be-associated-with-less-food-enjoyment/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 13 2018Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) belonging to the Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC, from its name in Spanish) and the Faculty of Business and Economics have proven that adolescents who suffer from obesity feel less food enjoyment than those who have a normal weight. In addition, their work reveals that even trivial restrictions on food intake (that is, temporary diets) are associated with a reduction in pleasure.For this work, published in the journal Food Quality and Preference, a large sample of 552 adolescents between 11 and 17 years old from several high schools in Granada has had their emotional reactions analyzed during the visualization of images of sweet foods.Related StoriesResearchers propose new avenue in the search for anti-obesity drugsSupervised fun, exercise both improve psychosocial health of children with obesityNew technique reduces postoperative deficit of oxygen in the blood in patients with morbid obesityThus, the researchers observed that those adolescents who reported different types of dietary restrictions (different types of diet, dieting very often, skipping breakfast, eating less frequently, etc.), along with those who were obese and those who had unhealthy behaviors unrelated to food (such as smoking or having insufficient sleep), felt less pleasure, attraction and desire to eat the highly palatable foods they were looking at (images of sweets, donuts, ice‑creams, chocolate crêpes, etc.).As explained by Laura Miccoli, main author of this study, “adolescence, typically associated with greater body dissatisfaction, is a key stage for the development of risky eating behaviors, related both to uncontrolled restrictions on food intake -which may lead to to the development of eating disorders- and with the stabilization of overweight and obesity.” Hence the importance of studies that approach both food‑related disorders from an integrative perspective.A pioneering studyNot in vain, the research led by the UGR is the first study that has examined the adolescents’ emotions toward sweet food cues based on a constellation of risk behaviors, related to both obesity and eating disorders.In the light of the results obtained, the UGR scientists point out that those adolescents who feel more pleasure or enjoyment when eating “have a healthy relationship with food, and this pleasure may be a possible protective factor against eating and weight‑related disorders.”Therefore, “consistent with recent prevention strategies, it is important to change the perspective on the enjoyment of food with respect to the prevention of obesity, banishing the idea that we should avoid the pleasure of eating. On the contrary: we should take advantage of it, and make food enjoyment -the ‘slow food movement’- a tool for healthy eating,” Miccoli points out.last_img read more

first_img Explore further France is ready to consider cutting its stake in Renault in the interests of consolidating the automaker’s alliance with Nissan, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Saturday. © 2019 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Renault tries to reassure partner Nissan on Fiat planscenter_img Citation: France ready to cut Renault stake to shore up Nissan partnership: minister (2019, June 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-france-ready-renault-staketo-shore.html Le Maire said Renault should concentrate on forging closer ties with Nissan before seeking other alliances He was speaking in Japan after Italian-US carmaker Fiat Chrysler pulled the plug on its proposed merger with Renault, saying negotiations had become “unreasonable” due to political resistance in Paris.In an interview with AFP on the sidelines of the G20 finance ministers meeting in Japan, Le Maire said Paris might consider reducing the state’s 15-percent stake in Renault if it led to a “more solid” alliance between the Japanese and French firms.”We can reduce the state’s stake in Renault’s capital. This is not a problem as long as, at the end of the process, we have a more solid auto sector and a more solid alliance between the two great car manufacturers Nissan and Renault,” he told AFP.Last week, FCA stunned the auto world with a proposed “merger of equals” with Renault that would—together with Renault’s Japanese partners Nissan and Mitsubishi Motors—create a car giant spanning the globe. The combined group would have been by far the world’s biggest, with total sales of some 15 million vehicles, compared to both Volkswagen and Toyota, which sell around 10.6 million apiece.But the deal collapsed suddenly on Thursday, with FCA laying the blame at the door of Paris. “It has become clear that the political conditions in France do not currently exist for such a combination to proceed successfully,” FCA said in a statement.Le Maire said Renault should concentrate on forging closer ties with its Japanese partner Nissan before seeking other alliances.Things need to be done “in the right order…. First the alliance (between Nissan and Renault) should be consolidated and then consolidation (more generally) and not one before the other.””Otherwise, everything risks collapsing like a house of cards,” he warned.The minister said it would be up to the bosses of Renault and Nissan to decide how to push the alliance forward as ties between the two firms have been strained after the shock arrest of former boss Carlos Ghosn.Renault is pushing for a full merger between the pair but there is deep scepticism of the plan at Nissan.There were varied reactions from the French unions Saturday.”The government is behaving like the agent of the big shareholders, favouring short-term profit to the detriment of the interests of the country,” said Fabien Gache, of the CGT union.Cutting the state’s share in Renault was abandoning its responsibility in the country’s auto industry, he argued.Franck Daout of the CFDT union said it backed a three-way alliance between Renault, Nissan and Japan’s Mitsubishi—but not one between Nissan and Renault until the alliance had reached a “safe and sustainable maturity”.last_img read more

first_img Image Gallery: How Technology Reveals Hidden Art Treasures 7 Amazing Places to Visit with Google Street View Satellite images of the buried ancient Egyptian city Tanis revealed city walls that were invisible to archaeologists on the ground. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak An eye inlay from a tomb dating to 4,000 years ago, in Lisht, Egypt. The expedition, co-led by Dr. Parcak, was conducted in partnership with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak Satellites analyze landscapes and use different parts of the light spectrum to uncover buried remnants of ancient civilizations. But studying archaeological sites from above had very humble (and low-tech) beginnings, Parcak told Live Science. Researchers first experimented with peering down from a great height at a historic location more than a century ago, when a member of the Corps of Royal Engineers photographed the 5,000-year-old monument Stonehenge from a hot-air balloon. “You could even see — from this very early and somewhat blurry photograph — staining in the landscape around the site, showing that there were buried features there,” Parcak said. Through the 1960s and into the 1970s, aerial photography continued to play an important role in archaeology. But when NASA launched its first satellites it opened up “a completely new world,” for archaeologists in the 1980s and 1990s, Parcak said. In fact, declassified images from the U.S. government’s Corona spy satellite program, which operated from 1959 to 1972, helped archaeologists in the 1990s to reconstruct the positions of important sites in the Middle East that had since disappeared, eradicated by urban expansion. In Photos: Ancient Egyptian Tombs Decorated with Creaturescenter_img If these stories of space archaeology in Parcak’s book leave readers wanting more, they’re in luck. An online platform called GlobalXplorer, launched and run by Parcak, offers users access to a library of satellite images for browsing and annotation. Aspiring “citizen-scientists” can join “campaigns” to assist in the ongoing search for lost cities and ancient structures, and to help experts identify signs of looting in vulnerable sites, according to the platform website. Since 2017, approximately 80,000 users have evaluated 14 million satellite images, mapping 700 major archaeological sites that were previously unknown, Parcak said. “Archaeology From Space” is available to buy on Amazon. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo What does it take to be a space archaeologist? No, you don’t need a rocket or a spacesuit. However, lasers are sometimes involved. And infrared cameras. And spy satellites. Welcome to Sarah Parcak’s world. Parcak, an archaeologist and a professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has mapped sites around the world from space; she does so using images captured by satellites — from NASA and from private companies — orbiting high above the ground. From these lofty heights, sensitive instruments can reveal details that are invisible to scientists on the ground, marking the positions of walls or even entire cities that have been buried for millennia. Parcak unpacks how views from space are transforming the field of archaeology, in her new book “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019). [Read an excerpt from “Archaeology From Space”] AdvertisementArchaeology Gets a Sci-Fi Makeover, In ‘Archaeology From Space’Live Science sits down with archaeologist and author Sarah Parcak to talk about her new book, “”Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019).Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65924-space-archaeology-highlights.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0020:0420:04Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  Today, aerial or satellite images captured by optical lenses, thermal cameras, infrared and lidar — light detection and ranging, a type of laser system — are well-established as part of an archaeologist’s tool kit. And archaeologists need as many tools as they can get; there are thought to be millions of sites around the world that are yet to be discovered, Parcak added. But remote sensing isn’t one-size-fits-all; different terrains require different space archaeology techniques. For example, in Egypt, layers of sand blanket lost pyramids and cities. In that type of landscape, high-resolution optical satellites reveal subtle differences on the surface that may hint at structures underground. And in regions with dense vegetation, such as in Southeast Asia or Central America, lidar emits millions of pulses of light to penetrate beneath the trees and detect hidden buildings, Parcak explained. In her own work, Parcak’s analysis of satellite views led to the creation of a new map for the legendary city of Tanis in Egypt, famously featured in the movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” Satellite images of Tanis revealed a vast network of the city’s buildings, which had previously gone undetected even as the site was under excavation, she wrote.last_img read more