first_imgLoris Karius is set to miss the start of the Premier League season as he faces two months on the sidelines with injury.It is understood the German goalkeeper broke his hand in the pre-season friendly loss to Chelsea, and has flown back to England from the USA to undergo surgery.Karius had started every one of Liverpool’s friendlies this summer, and he was in line to be Jurgen Klopp’s first-choice goalkeeper when the competitive season started.However, he is reportedly set to be out of action until the middle of October, missing games against Arsenal, Tottenham, Leicester, Chelsea and Manchester United.Simon Mignolet and Karius’ fellow summer signing Alex Manninger will now go head to head to stake a claim for the starting position in the weeks running up to the start of the Premier League. Loris Karius 1last_img read more

first_imgLOS ANGELES – An argument flared up once again on the Warriors’ bench at the end of another game here.This time, it did not involve Kevin Durant and Draymond Green over a late-game play. This time, it was Warriors coach Steve Kerr and Jordan Bell over a late-game performance.With 4:50 remaining in the Warriors’ 130-111 victory over the Lakers on Monday, Kerr and Bell had a heated argument on the sideline. Bell declined to comment on the incident afterwards, while Kerr kept his explanation …last_img read more

first_img23 May 2003Housing Minister Brigitte Mabandla announced during the department’s budget speech in Parliament this week that the government has raised the subsidy levels for people who qualify for low-cost houses.“We have decided to adjust the subsidy grant on an annual basis to ensure that the subsidy is not eroded by the effects of inflation,” said Mabandla.The minister said the government subsidy for people earning up to R1 500 per month would be increased 13.8% or R2 800, from R20 300 to R23 100.Those earning from R1 501 to R2 500 will see their subsidies increased by 11.8%, from R12 700 to R14 200.Mabandla said there would also be an R800 increase from R7 000 to R7 800 for people who fell within the income bracket of R2 501 to R3 500.She said the indigent, who included the aged, disabled and the infirm, would have their subsidy increased from R22 800 to R25 580, provided they earned no more than R800 per month.The consolidation subsidy for those earning up to R1 500 rises from R10 900 to R12 521 and for indigents from R13 400 to R15 000, representing increases of 14.8% and 11.9% respectively.Mabandla added that her department was investigating a possible raising of the income limit for the highest subsidy amount, from R1 500 per month to R1 794.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_img2 August 2005Two 190-million-year-old dinosaur embryos from a group of seven eggs have been identified as the oldest dinosaur embryos yet found. Discovered in South Africa, they are also the oldest known embryos for any terrestrial vertebrate – and the oldest evidence that dinosaurs were caring parents.The embryos are of an Early Jurassic prosauropod dinosaur, according to Dr Mike Raath of the Wits Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontological Research (BPI). Raath is one of five authors who describe the embryos in the 29 July 2005 isssue of leading international journal Science.“The embryos belong to the early sauropodomorph dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus,” he says. “These skeletons are quite common in South Africa and range in size from small juveniles to full adults, up to about five metres in length. This identification is a major coup, because embryos are often difficult to identify to species.”The late Professor James Kitching of the BPI discovered the cluster of eggs and their the embryos at the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the northeastern Free State in 1977.These are the oldest known dinosaur embryos. Two were exposed in the group of seven eggs. One of them is almost complete, and appears to be trapped in the act of hatching.The embryos are the oldest known for any terrestrial vertebrate, and so the oldest embryos in an amniote egg known from anywhere in the world.Since their discovery the eggs sat on a shelf in Wits University’s fossil store, awaiting someone with the necessary skill to prepare the fossil eggs for detailed study. The tiny embryonic bones are extremely delicate, and intricately curled up in the eggs.“In January 2000, Professor Robert Reisz of the University of Toronto at Mississauga in Canada was on a research visit to South Africa, and borrowed the fossil eggs to take back to Canada,” says Raath. “There Diane Scott of his lab carried out the detailed and difficult preparation under high magnification using a special microscope and achieved spectacular results.”Robert Reisz (left) with James Kitching, who discovered the fossilised dinosaur embryos in 1977 (Photo: Wits University)The growing dinosaurThe embryos provide significant insights into the growth and development of this early dinosaur. Raath explains that this discovery allowed the team to reconstruct in detail the growth trajectory of Massospondylus, from pre-hatchling to full adult – a first for any dinosaur.Reisz, the project leader, points out that adults and juveniles of other types of dinosaur are known, but they are usually either recovered from bone beds, where the skeletons are broken up, disarticulated and scattered, or the rare articulated skeletons are not sufficient to reflect a growth series.The growth trajectory of Massospondylus shows that this dinosaur started out as an awkward-looking little quadruped with had a relatively short tail, a horizontally held neck, long forelimbs and a huge head.As the animal grew, the neck grew faster than the rest of the body, but the forelimb and head grew much more slowly than the rest of the body, so the body proportions changed dramatically as the animal grew.Weird-looking animalThis means that Massospondylus changed from a tiny quadruped into a weird-looking large animal with a long neck (still held horizontally), a thick, massive tail, a very small head, short forelimbs, and long hind limbs.The result is an adult animal very different from the embryo, and probably at least partly bipedal. In other cases where embryos and adults are known, as in the hadrosaurs or duck-billed dinosaurs, such dramatic changes in body proportions are not shown.The embryos also provide clues about the origin of the quadrupedal gait of the giant sauropods (the brontosaurs) of later times, which are descendants of the prosauropods.The embryo of Massospondylus looks like a tiny sauropod with massive limbs walking on all fours. This means the quadrupedal gait of sauropods may have evolved through paedomorphosis – the retention of embryonic and juvenile features in the adult.“Some people think that humans too are products of paedomorphosis,” says Raath.Caring parentsThe absence of well-developed teeth in the two preserved embryos, which were clearly on the point of hatching, and the overall awkward body proportions suggest that the hatchlings required parental care of some kind for some time after emerging from the egg.If this interpretation is correct, it constitutes the oldest known indication of parental care in the fossil record.The embryos are about 190-million years old, from the Early Jurassic Period. Most other known dinosaur embryos are at least 100-million years younger, from the Cretaceous period of 80- to 65-million years ago.The five co-authers of the Science paper are Professor Robert Reisz, Diane Scott, David Evans, Dr Hans-Dieter Sues, and Dr Mike Raath.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgAlmost all civil society organisations in Manipur announced on Sunday that they will join the Citizenship Bill agitations on October 3 throughout the Northeast region in protest against the moves to pass the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill.A meeting of the representatives of the civil society organisations and social activists was held in Imphal on Sunday to reaffirm their stand against the Bill.Dilipkumar Yumnamcha, convener of the Manipur People Against Citizenship Amendment Bill (MANPAC) formed by over 84 civil society organisations in Manipur said, “People in the Northeast States are fuming over the one nation, one language theory. The people in Manipur have been agitating all these days contending that when enacted this Bill will be against the interest of the indigenous peoples of this region”.Even States such as Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram and Nagaland where there is travel restrictions of the outsiders since the Inner Line Permit is in force are not happy with the Bill.Mr. Yumnamcha said that because of the ferment in the NE States the Bill could not be tabled in Rajya Sabha. “However it does not mean that it will not be passed”, he added.All political parties in Manipur are also holding a meeting on Monday to make their stands clear to the people over the Bill.Chief Minister of Manipur N. Biren said that the Bill, when enacted, shall not harm the people of the State. However, his detractors maintain that people take his assurance with a pinch of salt. He said that police parolling and surveillance are intensified over the border towns said to be entry points of the illegal migrants.Another burning problem in Manipur is the forthcoming accord the Indian government is likely to sign with the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM). Several prominent politicians say that while the people welcome the forthcoming agreement with the NSCN(IM) they say that nothing should be done to threaten the unity and integrity of Manipur. Sunil Karam, president of United Committee Manipur which is for the protection of Manipur’s territory said that if Manipur’s voice is muffled people will “take up the cudgels to avenge the deaths of 18 persons on June 18, 2001”. They were protesting against the “without territorial limits” words in the agreement with the NSCN(IM).last_img read more

first_imgMajor Rohingya refugee camp populations in Bangladesh. AFPA plan to start repatriating Rohingya Muslims back to Myanmar is premature and the refugees are “terrified” about leaving Bangladesh where they sought refuge, dozens of aid agencies working in the region said Friday.More than 720,000 Rohingya Muslims fled Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state after a heavyhanded army crackdown in August last year that survivors say involved mass rape and extrajudicial killings.UN officials say the country’s military leaders should be investigated for genocide but Myanmar has rebuffed the calls, arguing it was only defending itself against Rohingya militants who attacked police posts.Both Bangladesh and Myanmar signed a repatriation agreement in November last year to allow Rohingya to return but many fear going back without guarantees of citizenship, freedom of movement and safety.However the governments confirmed in recent weeks that they were pushing ahead with the first large-scale repatriation set for mid-November, prompting an outcry from activists who say conditions on the ground in Rakhine are not adequate to take the refugees back.Rohingya Camp”They are terrified about what will happen to them if they are returned to Myanmar now, and distressed by the lack of information they have received,” the group of 42 aid agencies and civil society groups said in a statement that referred to the push as “dangerous.””They fled to Bangladesh to seek safety and they are very grateful to the Government of Bangladesh for giving them a safe haven.”Oxfam, World Vision and Save the Children were among the groups working in Myanmar and Bangladesh that signed the statement.They said refugees fear living in enclosed settlements like the one in central Rakhine state, where more than 120,000 Rohingya have been confined to camps for six years since intercommunal violence erupted in the region in 2012.Myint Khaing, the Maungdaw township administrator in northern Rakhine, told AFP that November 15 is the estimated repatriation start date and that the plan is to receive more than 2,200 people in total at a rate of 150 per day.But he seemed unsure if it would go ahead.”We can confirm only on the 15th whether the people from our given list are coming or not,” he said.Northern Rakhine has been largely sealed off since the crackdown except for tightly organised government trips for media and senior visiting diplomats.The UN has been granted access to the area to assess conditions on the ground but the approvals have been slow and the amount of territory accessible has been limited.Authorities in Bangladesh worry that Rohingya may once again risk travelling to other parts of Southeast Asia by boat, a route previously popular with those seeking economic opportunities outside the grim camps.This week Bangladesh’s coast guard rescued 33 Rohingyas and detained six alleged human traffickers from a fishing trawler headed for Malaysia in the Bay of Bengal.last_img read more

first_imgSeveral education marketing groups, including the Education Market Association, have found that roughly 99.5 percent of all public-school teachers and administrators use their own money to prepare their classrooms each year – when both state funding and parental contributions fall short. At an estimated cost per teacher of more than $400 per year, an increased number of educators now utilize nationwide donation sites, to buffer the costs.Schools in the District are no exception. A tour through DonorsChoose.org, which allows people to donate supplies to schools, shows teachers from both D.C. public and charter schools requesting materials ranging from personal hygiene products to books, laptops and drumsticks. “My students need toothbrushes, soap, and deodorant for personal use. In the classroom, we want to remain clean and healthy as well with the wipes, hand sanitizers, and tissues,” a request from Charles Drew Elementary School teacher Ms. O said.Another solicitation, from Mrs. Yarborough of Cesar Chavez Public Charter School in Northwest D.C. said: ‘My students need 60 copies of ‘Between the World and Me’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates.” According to the post, the book is the first book in her 9th grade class’ study of the Modern Black Experience in America.”As the school year begins, it is unclear how many requests will be successfully answered. At the root of the budget crisis, The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities noted at least 30 states paid less per student in school funding in 2014 than they did in 2008. Further, by mid-2012, local school districts had cut 351,000 jobs – with 297,000 jobs remaining unfilled. The result, the study concluded, was “more teachers digging more deeply into their pockets than ever before, and that’s before the school year has even begun.”Jacqueline Freeman, a retired DCPS teacher told the AFRO that parents are increasingly being asked to supply things to classrooms that the school used to provide. When coupled with an already tightened budget at home and deepened cuts within the school, teachers often feel obligated to make up the cost difference themselves.“There were friends of mine who worked in major corporations, who agreed to photocopy materials we needed because there were not enough books budgeted, others donated supplies so that my students would not be shortchanged by a lack of materials,” Freeman, who retired in 2010 told the AFRO. “It has gotten progressively worse, because now I am hearing that classrooms are coming up short for things like mats for the kids’ naps.”Staples offers a classroom registry, of sorts, that allows teachers to list the materials they require, and then promote those items to the public through their StaplesForStudents.org campaign each year. While the ire of some D.C. residents was raised at the thought of teachers having to pay for or solicit material donations, others told the AFRO that the donation sites bring needed attention to how city funds are being spent and how neighbors can help.“I just moved here as a single person with no children, but I would gladly help support our local schools with whatever they need,” Ward 7 resident Eric Taylor told the AFRO. “I had no idea schools were dealing with this sort of thing . . . it means that as a community, we need to do our due diligence and help our students and educators as much as possible.”In May, according to the Washington Post, the D.C. Council’s Committee on Education voted to raise per-pupil spending to 2.38 percent, which is more than a percentage point below the 3.5 percent increase recommended by education advocates.last_img read more