first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Navy’s plan to add 36 EA-18G Growlers at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in northwest Washington would trigger a four-field increase in field carrier practice landings at Outlying Landing Field Coupeville under the service’s preferred option for expanding its fleet of electronic warfare aircraft. The move faces strong opposition, however, from some residents on Whidbey Island over noise and the strain on local resources resulting from an influx of personnel, reports the Seattle Times. The Navy is scheduled to publish an environmental impact statement later this year, followed by a final decision on the planned expansion by the Navy secretary.Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Scott Woodlast_img read more

first_imgWikimedia [Representational Image]Two Boeing 737 passenger planes of SpiceJet suffered technical glitches forcing them to make emergency landing ahead of their scheduled routes on Saturday.The SpiceJet flight SG 8720 from Bengaluru to New Delhi made an emergency landing at Nagpur airport during the wee hours of Saturday. The aircraft was carrying 152 passengers.The airline officials said that the aircraft took off from Kempegowda International Airport in Bengaluru at 11.30 pm and had made an emergency landing at Nagpur because of fuel tank lid problem. The passengers were shifted to another plane after they were made to wait for eight hours.In a similar incident, a Chennai-bound SpiceJet flight SG-611 which departed from Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport in Mumbai at around 7.30 am also suffered technical snags and had to return to the airport. The pilots had to terminate the journey after being airborne for about 16 minutes.A SpiceJet spokesperson confirmed the return of its Chennai flight to Mumbai due to a “technical” issue. “The aircraft has already departed back for its destination around 10 am after the engineers rectified the glitch,” the spokesperson said, reports PTI.In a statement, the airlines said, “On 11th May 2019, SpiceJet flight SG-611 operating from Mumbai to Chennai returned back to Mumbai due to a technical issue. The issue has been rectified and boarding has started and the aircraft will depart shortly.”last_img read more

first_img Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — The Rev. William Barber II, a progressive activist and pastor, addressed the executive committee of the Democratic National Committee on Friday (Aug. 23), calling on party leaders to host a presidential debate focused on poverty and to do more to address the concerns of poor and low-income Americans.The co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, named for the last major campaign of Martin Luther King Jr., Barber insisted that poverty touches all people and regions of the United States and overlaps with related concerns such as racism, voter suppression, healthcare, “ecological justice,” militarism and religious nationalism.“We have to say the word, ‘Poverty,’” said Barber, according to a copy of his remarks provided to Religion News Service. “We need to lift up the stories of folks in Appalachia and Kansas and the Mississippi Delta. We need to hold them alongside the folks in our gentrifying cities, some of whom work two jobs and still sleep in their cars at night.”The speech, delivered during the DNC’s summer meeting in San Francisco, California, comes as Democratic primary candidates are jostling for votes among the party’s progressive base, for whom Barber has become an increasingly visible leader since speaking at the 2016 Democratic Convention..@CoryBooker & @KamalaHarris watching @RevDrBarber backstage pic.twitter.com/IGJaR836ca— Sabrina Singh (@sabrinasingh24) August 23, 2019When Barber concluded his speech, many in the room leapt to their feet in raucous applause as DNC Chair Tom Perez declared “Let the church say, ‘Amen’!” Perez then called on those present to take a moment of contemplative silence.Officials from the Poor People’s Campaign said Barber planned on calling for a Democratic debate on the topic of poverty, but the chances of having such a debate are slim. In June, DNC officials told RNS that the party does not intend to hold single-issue debates. On Thursday (Aug. 22), the DNC resolutions committee voted 17-8 against holding a debate focused on climate change, sparking outrage among environmental activists.Asked about a potential poverty debate at a candidate forum hosted by the Poor People’s Campaign in June, however, all nine Democratic presidential hopefuls who attended — including former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, and Kamala Harris — said they would support it.The Poor People’s Campaign, which now has established chapters in more than 40 states, has long championed the notion of creating a “new electorate” of poor and low-income Americans, who are often less likely to vote than other Americans. If mobilized, Barber and his allies argue, the less well-off could potentially swing elections.In his address, Barber announced his intention to launch a nine-month, 22-stop “We Will Do MORE” campaign focused on mobilizing, organizing, registering and educating poorer Americans. In a statement issued before Barber’s address, the Poor People’s Campaign noted that it was not meant to endorse any party or politician, adding that officials also reached out to the Republican Party but have not yet heard back. In addition, Barber argued in his speech that the issue of poverty is not about “left versus right, but right versus wrong.”Even so, the pastor, who helped lead North Carolina’s Moral Mondays protests credited with helping to unseat the state’s Republican governor in 2016 — had harsh words for Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, comparing his decision to block efforts to pass voting rights legislation to infamous segregationist Strom Thurmond’s decision to filibuster the Civil Rights Act in 1957.Barber also voiced thinly veiled criticism of the Trump administration’s policies and of Christians who support them.“For too long, faith has been hijacked by those who say abortion and sexuality are the only moral issues,” Barber said. “They tell religious people to vote their pro-life/pro-family values, then they use their political power to pass policies that keep families in poverty, separate families at the border, keep families from getting healthcare and endanger the lives of children in schools, worshipers in churches and the planet itself.”He invoked scripture to dismiss claims that polices designed to help the poor would be tantamount to socialism.“If someone calls it socialism, then we must compel them to acknowledge that the Bible promotes socialism,” he said. “This current administration is practicing socialism to corporations and the greedy through tax cuts, deregulation and economic incentives. And then they refuse to bail out communities and human beings.”Barber mentioned Pastor Cecil Williams of San Francisco’s Glide Memorial Church, whose shelter has served 80,000 meals to the city’s poor.“When we have 26 presidential debates and not one hour is focused on living wages, we must have a movement,” Barber said in his speech, referring to past presidential election cycles.He later added: “We need a revolution of values in public life, and we need leadership that will draw on our deepest religious and Constitutional traditions to fight not only for what seems achievable, but for what is our moral duty.”Barber and the Poor People’s Campaign have already exhibited unusual influence on the 2020 Democratic primary. South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, bearing “silent witness,” showed up at a protest Barber and his co-chair, the Rev. Liz Theoharis, held outside the White House in June to decry the Trump administration’s policies.Buttigieg later referred to Barber while speaking at a Black Church PAC event in August. Joe Biden, too, has referenced arguments made by the Poor People’s Campaign when making claims about widespread poverty in the U.S. Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Share This! Jack Jenkins Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.,Load Comments,Photos of the Week Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins German town welcomes hundreds from different faiths for food, worship and unity By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Catholicism Tags2020 election Democratic Party homepage featured Poor People’s Campaign religious left Top Story,You may also like Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This!last_img read more

first_imgSeveral education marketing groups, including the Education Market Association, have found that roughly 99.5 percent of all public-school teachers and administrators use their own money to prepare their classrooms each year – when both state funding and parental contributions fall short. At an estimated cost per teacher of more than $400 per year, an increased number of educators now utilize nationwide donation sites, to buffer the costs.Schools in the District are no exception. A tour through DonorsChoose.org, which allows people to donate supplies to schools, shows teachers from both D.C. public and charter schools requesting materials ranging from personal hygiene products to books, laptops and drumsticks. “My students need toothbrushes, soap, and deodorant for personal use. In the classroom, we want to remain clean and healthy as well with the wipes, hand sanitizers, and tissues,” a request from Charles Drew Elementary School teacher Ms. O said.Another solicitation, from Mrs. Yarborough of Cesar Chavez Public Charter School in Northwest D.C. said: ‘My students need 60 copies of ‘Between the World and Me’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates.” According to the post, the book is the first book in her 9th grade class’ study of the Modern Black Experience in America.”As the school year begins, it is unclear how many requests will be successfully answered. At the root of the budget crisis, The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities noted at least 30 states paid less per student in school funding in 2014 than they did in 2008. Further, by mid-2012, local school districts had cut 351,000 jobs – with 297,000 jobs remaining unfilled. The result, the study concluded, was “more teachers digging more deeply into their pockets than ever before, and that’s before the school year has even begun.”Jacqueline Freeman, a retired DCPS teacher told the AFRO that parents are increasingly being asked to supply things to classrooms that the school used to provide. When coupled with an already tightened budget at home and deepened cuts within the school, teachers often feel obligated to make up the cost difference themselves.“There were friends of mine who worked in major corporations, who agreed to photocopy materials we needed because there were not enough books budgeted, others donated supplies so that my students would not be shortchanged by a lack of materials,” Freeman, who retired in 2010 told the AFRO. “It has gotten progressively worse, because now I am hearing that classrooms are coming up short for things like mats for the kids’ naps.”Staples offers a classroom registry, of sorts, that allows teachers to list the materials they require, and then promote those items to the public through their StaplesForStudents.org campaign each year. While the ire of some D.C. residents was raised at the thought of teachers having to pay for or solicit material donations, others told the AFRO that the donation sites bring needed attention to how city funds are being spent and how neighbors can help.“I just moved here as a single person with no children, but I would gladly help support our local schools with whatever they need,” Ward 7 resident Eric Taylor told the AFRO. “I had no idea schools were dealing with this sort of thing . . . it means that as a community, we need to do our due diligence and help our students and educators as much as possible.”In May, according to the Washington Post, the D.C. Council’s Committee on Education voted to raise per-pupil spending to 2.38 percent, which is more than a percentage point below the 3.5 percent increase recommended by education advocates.last_img read more

first_img(Phys.org) —The market for thin, flexible, printed electronic circuits is potentially huge. Although tremendous advances have been made in printing organic semiconductors like thin-film transistors (TFTs), one of their present limitations is a relatively high operating voltage requirement. 3D printed lithium-ion batteries with acceptable single-cell potentials (~3V) have been previously demonstrated, at least on small scales. The main concerns though, are that even with hermetic packaging, the raw materials for these cells still pose inherent safety and reliability risks. For wearable devices, which are a major application for flexible printed devices, a more versatile technology has been sought. A new study in Applied Physics Letters describes recent experiments with a different battery chemistry—Zn-MnO2. Using special fabrication techniques, a 10-cell series configuration of the battery was able to generate peak voltages of 14 volts, and a capacity of up to 0.8 mA h. © 2013 Phys.org The main incentive to developing printed thin-film batteries is that they would be able to be fabricated on the same production line as the rest of a printed electronic device. Much research has gone into reducing the relatively high potential (10-30V) of solution-phase printed organic TFTs. The fact remains that a lot of the traditional problems of these devices like low mobility, large channel lengths, drain-source shorting, and thick dielectric layers, go away when higher voltages are used. The ability to now make high-potential batteries based on alkaline chemistry, like the Zn-MnO2, removes many of the traditional concerns with lithium batteries.Alkaline batteries are generally less expensive than lithium batteries, and their environmentally friendly raw materials do not need to be hermetically sealed. The cells are printed on commercially available polyvivyl alcohol/cellulose(PAC) membranes. The 100um thick membrane also serves as a separator and a substrate for the Zn and MnO2 electrodes. A hydrophobic fluoropolymer solution (Teflon AF) is printed between the electrodes to reduce electrolyte migration and conduction between neighboring electrodes of different cells. The anode and cathode are printed from solution-based inks composed of conductive additives and binder materials. The cells were connected with a printed silver-based ink.The anode and cathode footprint of the battery, as well as their separation distance, is 1 cm2. The open circuit potential of 14 V is limited mainly by self-discharge of the MnO2 electrode during processing, particularly as a result of the multiple baking steps needed to evaporate solvents. The battery was tested by discharging through a 100 kΩ resistive load. After 7.5 hours, the potential dropped to 10V, which was what was used for the conservatively-set 0.8 mA h capacity.To further characterize their battery, a technique known as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine the ohmic resistance (1.20 Ω), and the charge transfer resistance (0.8 Ω). These values are low enough for the individual cells that they do not cause major impedance losses when assembled into a 10-cell device. The researchers also gave the battery a real-word test to demonstrate its performance within an actual printed circuit. They used a ring oscillator circuit made from five simple inverting gates connected head-to-tail. The frequency of an output tap on this circuit depends on supply voltage and delay through the circuit. The ring oscillator test circuit only drew a very low current and the resulting waveform peaked at 13 V on each 10 ms cycle. After 20 minutes of use, no changes in the open circuit potential were detectable, suggesting that simple circuits could be powered for an extended duration. More complex circuits may likely draw much more power than a ring oscillator, but the new Zn-MnO2 battery looks like it will be a good alternative to lithium for many foreseable printed device applications. Journal information: Applied Physics Letters Citation: Physicists develop flexible multicell Zn-MnO2 battery for printed electronics (2013, June 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-physicists-flexible-multicell-zn-mno2-battery.html Explore furthercenter_img Printed Flexible Zn-Mno2 Battery. Credit: A. Gaikwad et. al. Applied Physics Letters Vol 102 Issue 23 More information: A flexible high potential printed battery for powering printed electronics, Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 233302 (2013); dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4810974 AbstractMechanically flexible arrays of alkaline electrochemical cells fabricated using stencil printing onto fibrous substrates are shown to provide the necessary performance characteristics for driving ink-jet printed circuits. Due to the dimensions and material set currently required for reliable low-temperature print processing of electronic devices, a battery potential greater than that sourced by single cells is typically needed. The developed battery is a series interconnected array of 10 low resistance Zn-MnO2 alkaline cells, giving an open circuit potential of 14 V. This flexible battery is used to power an ink-jet printed 5-stage complementary ring oscillator based on organic semiconductors. Battery embedded in circuit board demonstrated at Tokyo exhibition This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more