first_imgThe IBC exhibition had recorded 49,808 people through the door at 10.30 this morning, which IBC CEO Michael Crimp said was comparable with last year’s 50,462 and up on 2010. Crimp said that registrations had fallen a little behind on last year over the Olympics period, but had recovered ahead of the show. “At the end of the day we didn’t seem to be impacted by the Olympics,” he said. “However, it explains why we had a different pattern of registrations.”Crimp said that record space had been sold to exhibitors this year, which saw the introduction of a new hall, Hall 14, outside the Rai building. This introduced 6,000 sq. metres of additional space. IBC had sold 20,000 sq. metres of space for next year’s show as of last night, he said.Referring to the introduction of recording artist and Intel creative director will.i.am as a conference speaker at this year’s event, Crimp said that his session had attracted 500 viewers, filling the main conference Forum space. This year’s IBC marked the second year of the Leaders’ Summit, a closed session for media leaders, this year featuring FremantleMedia CEO Gary Carter as an after-dinner speaker.A ‘Rising Stars’ event for new entrants to the industry and students attracted 120 attendees, while the Innovation Awards had attracted a significant number of nominations from end users as well as vendors, said Crimp.Phil White, director of technology and events, highlighted Japanese broadcaster NHK’s 8K demonstration and the world premier of a movie – Hugo 3D – screened on a laser projector.IBC conference chairman Michael Lumley said this year’s show had seen the introduction of new formats, including breakfast briefings. The IBC Awards had given a genuine representation of the breadth of the industry, he said.last_img read more

first_imgGiuliano GiorgettiEleven Sports has named Giuliano Giorgetti as managing director for Italy.Giorgetti, who begins his role immediately, will be responsible for expanding Eleven’s growth in Italy, increasing revenues, developing strategic partnerships, and overseeing the day to day operations.He previously worked for football clubs AC Milan and the Inter Milan.At AC Milan he led the club’s digital efforts with a special focus on content strategy, user experience, social media, and marketing. Giorgetti is also credited with helping to deliver a modern entertainment business for Inter Milan by managing the re-brand of the club’s TV channel. He was also responsible for digital partnerships, media rights and fan acquisition across social and owned media platforms.As well as his role at Eleven Sports Italy, Giorgetti will also act as head of digital and commercial partnerships at global investment company and Eleven Sports’ parent company, Aser. According to the company he will offer his expertise in helping Aser become a leading global media innovator in content creation and distribution.Former Eleven Sports Italy managing director Bruno Stirparo will stay as an advisor.Giorgetti will report directly to Eleven Sports Group managing director Danny Menken and Aser managing director Marco Pistoni.Menken, said: “Since we entered the Italian market following our acquisition of Sportube last year, we have made great strides with our rights acquisitions, distribution and popularity amongst the fans. Giuliano’s knowledge and experience of the Italian sports media industry makes him the perfect person to lead our team in Italy as we look to continue our progression.”Giorgetti, said: “I am extremely excited to take on two such interesting roles in a dynamic and fast moving organisation. Eleven Sports has made remarkable progress in Italy, and I am delighted to be joining such a talented team. I am looking forward to applying my skills that I have developed over nearly two decades in the sports and media sectors to help drive innovation and change. We are open to every opportunity in this moment where the scenario changes rapidly.”Separately, Eleven Sports has added live and exclusive coverage of Dutch Eredivisie, Chinese Super League and Allsvenskan football to its line-up of content for UK and Ireland viewers.Coverage of the Eredivisie will start with the upcoming 2018-19 season, while the Chinese Super League will begin on Eleven from the 2019 season, and coverage of the Allsvenskan will start with the currently ongoing 2018 season.last_img read more

first_img“We are on the cusp of curing aging.” Those are the words of molecular biologist Dr. William Andrews, founder and CEO of Sierra Sciences, a company with the stated goal to “cure aging or die trying.” In the quote above, which comes from a September 2010 Sierra Sciences press release, Andrews is referring to a nutraceutical (i.e., a natural food-derived product meant to provide health or medical benefits, like vitamin C or folic acid) that his company discovered, known as TA-65. It supposedly slows down the aging process in humans by activating an enzyme called telomerase. Telomerase acts on telomeres—simple repeating sequences of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA) found at the tips of chromosomes that are important to cell division and replication. Cells must replicate their genes accurately and completely whenever they divide, or the so-called daughter cell will malfunction and die. However, most DNA polymerases (the enzymes that replicate DNA) cannot copy chromosomes all the way to the end. Thus, during each cell division, a small region at the tip of the chromosome (part of the telomere) remains uncopied. So, the telomeres have a crucial function: they act as a buffer zone during cell division, protecting the genes in the chromosome and ensuring that they fully replicate. But there’s a cost: successive divisions cause the telomeres to erode over time. When telomeres erode away, parts of critical genes remain uncopied, eventually spelling death for the cell. Some scientists think that this telomere erosion is what imposes a limit on our lifespans and causes our health to decline as we age; they also think that an answer to this dilemma might be telomerase activation. Telomerase combats telomere erosion by adding telomeric subunits (repeating sequences of nucleotides) to the ends of the chromosome, thereby allowing it to continue to divide intact. The origin of telomerase still remains a mystery. It appears to be critical during human embryonic development, but then fades away. Little is found in the body after birth, for reasons we don’t yet understand. Some scientists, like Dr. Andrews, think telomerase activation could be the cure for aging that his company is looking for, and he views TA-65 as a potential big first step in that direction. According to Andrews: TA-65 is going to go down in history as the first supplement you can take that doesn’t merely extend your life a few years by improving your health, but actually affects the underlying mechanisms of aging. Better telomerase inducers will be developed in the coming years, but TA-65 is the first of a whole new family of telomerase-activating therapies that could eventually keep us young and healthy forever. Well, if proven true, that’s a game-changer, to say the least. Just keep on living until you meet with a fatal accident. Woo hoo! But… hold on. Turns out we shouldn’t get irrationally exuberant just yet. It might not be such a good idea to activate telomerase, after all—because of the role it seems to play in cancer. Cancers can arise when genetic mutations inside a cell cause it to escape from normal controls on replication and migration. The cell and its offspring multiply uncontrollably while invading and damaging nearby tissue. With the presence of telomerase, cancerous cells—which apparently synthesize the enzyme—avoid telomere erosion. They essentially become immortal, dividing for as long as the host survives. A 2012 study by the MD Anderson Cancer Center found that activating telomerase following telomere degradation actually made tumors stronger and more deadly. So alas, TA-65 and telomerase activation might not be the miracle aging “cure” Dr. Andrews was hoping for. But what about other areas of anti-aging/longevity research? There’s a lot of talk these days about humans becoming essentially immortal in the near future, but is the hype supported by any actual research? Let’s see. The Quest for Immortality Continues People have been obsessed with the idea of immortality and living forever for centuries. According to Adam Gollner in The Book of Immortality: The Science, Belief, and Magic Behind Living Forever: The twenty-five-year old Emperor Ai of Jin died in 365 CE, after overdosing on longevity drugs. He wasn’t the last leader to die trying to live forever. The fascination with chemical immortality reached an ironic apogee centuries later, during the T’ang dynasty (618-907 CE), when elixirs poisoned those hoping for precisely the opposite effect. In the late 1300s, legend has it that alchemist Nicolas Flamel created a “sorcerer’s stone” that was then used to produce a potion, the elixir of life, which is said to make the drinker immortal. The idea was so alluring that despite a complete lack of evidence to support the existence of the stone and the elixir, other scientists, including the great Sir Isaac Newton, later tried to replicate Flamel’s results. To no avail. And of course there’s the fabled Fountain of Youth that became associated with Spanish explorer Ponce de León in the early 1500s. We know what happened to him. People today are no different. Not wanting to die is as natural as life itself. Below we’ll present a few interesting discoveries that may (or may not) mark some progress in our quest to live forever. But first we must answer a question. What Is Anti-Aging Medicine? The telomere erosion we talked about earlier certainly plays a part in aging, but most scientists don’t believe that it’s the only factor. They typically view aging as a sort of ongoing cellular wear and tear, where stresses from the environment and inside our cells (such as errors in DNA replication) accumulate throughout life and eventually wear out our cells and tissues. Scientists who search for a modern anti-aging elixir seek to slow down or reverse this process in order to extend both the maximum and average lifespan of people. And even if that doesn’t pan out, advocates of anti-aging medicine contend that at the least, targeting and altering the underlying mechanisms of aging will bring us more efficient ways to deal with age-related conditions like heart disease and many cancers. Now critics dispute the portrayal of aging itself as a disease, of course, but that’s not for us to debate here. Let’s just agree with the commonly stated goal of anti-aging medicine, to “add more years to your life, and life to your years.” Caloric Restriction Mimetics In 1934, scientists at Cornell University found that mice on an abnormally low-calorie diet lived about twice as long as mice who ate as much as they wanted. Scientists have since found that this caloric restriction also lengthens the lives of fruit flies, rats, and even primates, suggesting that this is an avenue worth pursuing in anti-aging medicine. The going (very basic) hypothesis of why these animals live longer is that their bodies treat food scarcity as an extreme type of stress. So they mount a physiological response to cope with the lack of nutrition. And that toughens them up, promoting health and longevity during the time of deprivation, even if that time is significantly extended. Starving yourself in order to get stronger? That sure seems counterintuitive. But the results from numerous experiments make a compelling case. The problem with caloric restriction is that it’s not a very pleasant way to live if you’re fortunate enough to be able to consume a “normal” amount of food on a regular basis (which is between 2,400 and 3,000 calories a day for active males). So scientists are trying to develop drugs (called caloric restriction mimetic drugs) that re-create the anti-aging benefits of caloric restriction without having to change one’s diet. Resveratrol, which is found in the skin of red grapes, was an early favorite in this category. It was first thought to activate a class of enzymes called sirtuins that have been associated with the anti-aging benefits of caloric restriction; but more recent studies have raised serious doubts about whether this compound (and more potent versions of it) actually activates these enzymes and has life-extending benefits. A drug called rapamycin has shown more promise as a caloric restriction mimetic by inhibiting a molecular signaling pathway called TOR. The TOR pathway acts as sort of as a food sensor and helps regulate the body’s response to nutrient availability. Blocking it has been shown on multiple occasions to extend the lifespan of lab knockout mice while keeping them lean and healthy in their later years. Unfortunately, however, the drug’s anti-aging potential in humans is offset by its potent immunosuppressant effects. Overall, research in this field has a long way to go. NAD As we noted above, aging is a sort of cellular wear and tear. According to Dr. David Sinclair of Harvard Medical School, there’s a specific biological signal that accompanies aging and tells cells it’s time to check out. It’s triggered when the cell perceives a lack of oxygen. That makes the mitochondria less efficient at converting fuel (such as glucose) into the ATP needed for cells to function properly. But Sinclair and his colleagues recently found a way to counteract that signal. Using a natural chemical compound called NAD, they were able to revive older cells in mice and make them appear energetic and young again. After receiving NAD for just one week, two-year-old mice tissue came to resemble that of six-month-old mice. “When we give the molecule, the cells think oxygen levels are normal and everything revs back up again,” Sinclair explained. “If a body is slowly falling apart and losing the ability to regulate itself effectively, we can get it back on track to what it was in its 20s and 30s.” Let’s hope. FOXO Molecular biologist Cynthia Kenyon thinks she may have found another of the keys to a long life through her study of tiny worms called C. elegans. By tweaking just one gene in these worms (to simply make it more active), she was able to take two-week-old C. elegans (which is a creaky old age for these things) and make them appear about half that age. And her modified worms lived twice as long as the normal worms. “So they’re like 90-year-old people who look 45,” said Kenyon. The gene Kenyon changed: FOXO. FOXO is a sort of master gene that helps C. elegans protect and repair its tissues (and live longer) by controlling a number of other genes. According to Kenyon: You can think of it as a superintendent of a building. So if you have a building, a nice big building, obviously it has to be maintained. What FOXO does, or the building superintendent does, is to keep the building in good working order. It makes sure that the walls are painted, by hiring painters; it makes sure that the floors are swept. The building superintendent would hire workers to do these different things. What FOXO does, in the cell, is it switches on other genes … I’d say, altogether, there are probably about a hundred worker genes that have very important roles. And, together, what you get is a cell or tissue or an animal that stays in really good working condition for a lot longer. What’s particularly exciting about Kenyon’s work is that the FOXO gene is also found in humans, and that a more protective version of FOXO (as in Kenyon’s modified worms) is associated with longer, healthier lives. Molecular biologist Timothy Donlon found in his studies that if you have this more protective version of FOXO, you have a twofold greater chance of living to 100. And if you have two copies of it, you have a threefold greater chance of living to 100, while remaining healthy. So the gene is indeed associated with adding life to your years and years to your life. If scientists could create a drug to tweak FOXO in humans like Kenyon did in her worms, it seems like we’d have an effective anti-aging medicine on our hands. We could go on with other examples of promising research in anti-aging medicine, but that’s a reasonable sample. It’s the ultimate area of scientific research, really. Moreover, it seems likely to bring benefits to humankind (and also be lucrative for savvy investors) whether aging is a disease that can be “cured” or not. And before leaving you today, I do want to remind you once more about the opportunity to get in on Casey OnePass. It’s just open until Monday, and it’s your only chance to get all eight of our newsletters for a huge discount. Click here to learn more and get started.last_img read more

first_img – NEW WARNING FROM DOUG CASEY – READ IMMEDIATELY Over the years, Doug Casey’s forecasts have caused a lot of controversy… Like during the peak of the dot-com bubble when he warned a major crash in tech stocks was near… Or near 2008 when he warned America’s financial structure would be threatened with collapse. Critics called him “offensive,” “brash,” “irreverent.” But Doug was spot-on, every time. Not only that… Folks who heeded his warnings had the opportunity to make rare and extraordinary gains of 770%, 1,333%, and more. Yet, those could be a drop in the bucket if his latest controversial forecast about President Trump is right. Click here for the full story. Recommended Links — WARNING: Don’t File Social Security Benefits Until You See This We just uncovered something shocking that could mean the difference between collecting a meager $1,000 from Social Security… Or getting up to $6,235 a month you can use for your retirement. That’s real cash deposited in your account… coming from the private sector. But according to a law that governs this special situation, you must act before April 21. Click here to get started today. Editor’s note: The “Greater Depression” has started… Yesterday, Casey Research founder Doug Casey compared what happened in the 1930s to what’s going on today. Below, he breaks down more of these likely differences… By Doug Casey, founder, Casey Research PRICES 1930s Prices dropped radically because billions of dollars of inflationary currency were wiped out through the stock market crash, bond defaults, and bank failures. The government, however, somehow equated the high prices of the inflationary ’20s with prosperity and attempted to prevent a fall in prices by such things as slaughtering livestock, dumping milk in the gutter, and enacting price supports. Since the collapse wiped out money faster than it could be created, the government felt the destruction of real wealth was a more effective way to raise prices. In other words, if you can’t increase the supply of money, decrease the supply of goods. Nonetheless, the 1930s depression was a deflationary collapse, a time when currency became worth more and prices dropped. This is probably the most confusing thing to most Americans since they assume—as a result of that experience—that “depression” means “deflation.” It’s also perhaps the biggest single difference between this depression and the last one. Today Prices could drop, as they did the last time, but the amount of power the government now has over the economy is far greater than what was the case 80 years ago. Instead of letting the economy cleanse itself by allowing the financial markets to collapse, governments will probably bail out insolvent banks, create mortgages wholesale to prop up real estate, and central banks will buy bonds to keep their prices from plummeting. All of these actions mean that the total money supply will grow enormously. Trillions will be created to avoid deflation. If you find men selling apples on street corners, it won’t be for 5 cents apiece, but $5 apiece. But there won’t be a lot of apple sellers because of welfare, nor will there be a lot of apples because of price controls. Consumer prices will probably skyrocket as a result, and the country will have an inflationary depression. Unlike the 1930s, when people who held dollars were king, by the end of the Greater Depression, people with dollars will be wiped out. THE SOCIETY 1930s The world was largely rural or small-town. Communications were slow, but people tended to trust the media. The government exercised considerable moral suasion, and people tended to support it. The business of the country was business, as Calvin Coolidge said, and men who created wealth were esteemed. All told, if you were going to have a depression, it was a rather stable environment for it; despite that, however, there were still plenty of riots, marches, and general disorder. Today The country is now urban and suburban, and although communications are rapid, there’s little interpersonal contact. The media are suspect. The government is seen more as an adversary or an imperial ruler than an arbitrator accepted by a consensus of concerned citizens. Businessmen are viewed as unscrupulous predators who take advantage of anyone weak enough to be exploited. A major financial smashup in today’s atmosphere could do a lot more than wipe out a few naives in the stock market and unemploy some workers, as occurred in the ’30s; some sectors of society are now time bombs. It’s hard to say, for instance, what third- and fourth-generation welfare recipients are going to do when the going gets really tough. THE WAY PEOPLE WORK 1930s Relatively slow transportation and communication localized economic conditions. The U.S. itself was somewhat insulated from the rest of the world, and parts of the U.S. were fairly self-contained. Workers were mostly involved in basic agriculture and industry, creating widgets and other tangible items. There wasn’t a great deal of specialization, and that made it easier for someone to move laterally from one occupation into the next, without extensive retraining, since people were more able to produce the basics of life on their own. Most women never joined the workforce, and the wife in a marriage acted as a “backup” system should the husband lose his job. Today The whole world is interdependent, and a war in the Middle East or a revolution in Africa can have a direct and immediate effect on a barber in Chicago or Krakow. Since the whole economy is centrally controlled from Washington, a mistake there can be a national disaster. People generally aren’t in a position to roll with the punches as more than half the people in the country belong to what is known as the “service economy.” That means, in most cases, they’re better equipped to shuffle papers than make widgets. Even “necessary” services are often terminated when times get hard. Specialization is part of what an advanced industrial economy is all about, but if the economic order changes radically, it can prove a liability. THE FINANCIAL MARKETS 1930s The last depression is identified with the collapse of the stock market, which lost over 90% of its value from 1929 to 1933. A secure bond was the best possible investment as interest rates dropped radically. Commodities plummeted, reducing millions of farmers to near subsistence levels. Since most real estate was owned outright and taxes were low, a drop in price didn’t make a lot of difference unless you had to sell. Land prices plummeted, but since people bought it to use, not unload to a greater fool, they didn’t usually have to sell. Today This time, stocks—and especially commodities—are likely to explode on the upside as people panic into them to get out of depreciating dollars in general and bonds in particular. Real estate will be—next to bonds—the most devastated single area of the economy because no one will lend money long term. And real estate is built on the mortgage market, which will vanish. Everybody who invests in this depression thinking that it will turn out like the last one will be very unhappy with the results. Being aware of the differences between the last depression and this one makes it a lot easier to position yourself to minimize losses and maximize profits. So much for the differences. The crucial, obvious, and most important similarity, however, is that most people’s standard of living will fall dramatically. The Greater Depression has started. Most people don’t know it because they can neither confront the thought nor understand the differences between this one and the last. As a climax approaches, many of the things that you’ve built your life around in the past are going to change and change radically. The ability to adjust to new conditions is the sign of a psychologically healthy person. Look for the opportunity side of the crisis. The Chinese symbol for “crisis” is a combination of two other symbols—one for danger and one for opportunity. The dangers that society will face in the years ahead are regrettable, but there’s no point in allowing anxiety, frustration, or apathy to overcome you. Face the future with courage, curiosity, and optimism rather than fear. You can be a winner, and if you plan carefully, you will be. The great period of change will give you a chance to regain control of your destiny. And that in itself is the single most important thing in life. This depression can give you that opportunity; it’s one of the many ways the Greater Depression can be a very good thing for both you as an individual and society as a whole. Editor’s note: America is about to enter a crisis far more severe than what we saw in 2008–2009. It could all start after Trump’s inauguration and could change everything… in sudden, unexpected ways. This is exactly why Doug and his team put together a time-sensitive video explaining how it could all go down. Click here to watch it now.last_img read more

first_img Your reaction to particularly awful days can make or break future success. The better action to take is to remain as calm as possible. Take quiet time to analyze how far you have come. Think about the twists and turns, and what currently has you stopped in your tracks.Numerous conversations revealed that many almost quit their current endeavors. But one common factor as to why they did not quit helped them to prevail: They enjoy what they do too much! Ironically, it has become their way of life.As uncertainty hits, follow these two suggestions:Take the time needed to uncover the better route.Convert a negative frame of mind into a positive.Reframe the situationOne sales technique referred to as “Reframing” applies very well to difficult situations. Whether personal or trying to work with a client, the first step is to figure out where the discontent originates. Upon recognizing the misstep, it becomes easier to work together to find the better solution. By asking a series of questions such as, “What if…” the improved path begins to reveal itself.On the personal side, moving from negative to positive thought is the beginning step for improvement. The change in attitude makes an enormous difference in providing increased opportunity to save the day.The day that you find you are doubting yourself, take private time to consider “the why” that is. Most likely, one of your peers will have had a similar experience. Have a conversation about how they dealt with it and ask for recommendations on how to handle. Their insights won’t necessarily apply or even matter. It’s more about the conversation itself. Just by unleashing the dilemma is all it takes to get back to full steam ahead.  As others see you meeting negativity and obstacles head on, they come to admire your steadfast personal brand.Tips:When negativity hits, stop to examine the origin.Decide whether changes need to be made.Should changes be in order, decide whether they are minor or major.Begin the process by eliminating the no longer needed.Create a list of what needs to be fixed.Prioritize the list in order of immediate need.Re-energize yourself and/or business by communicating. –shares Image credit: Shutterstock Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. The day that you find you are doubting yourself, take private time to consider why that is. Elinor Stutz Opportunity CEO of Smooth Sale, Author & Inspirational Speakercenter_img September 17, 2016 Next Article Add to Queue 2 min read This story originally appeared on Personal Branding Blog Transform Dark Days into Opportunity Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

first_imgThose who used a vitamin D supplement, were less likely to be vitamin D deficient as may be expected, but supplement use was low (4.4%) and, therefore, food fortification and other strategies need to be considered at policy level for older populations.” Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 13 2019Over a quarter of adults aged 50+ are deficient in vitamin D according to researchers from Trinity College Dublin who announced their findings today (Thursday, June 13th). Over half (57%) had inadequate serum vitamin D levels, of which 26% were classed as vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D has a known role in bone health, with growing evidence for beneficial effects on muscle strength and other non-skeletal outcomes. The study was recently published in the international, peer-reviewed journal Nutrients.Better understanding of factors that contribute to vitamin D deficiency is needed to identify people most at-risk. Determinants of deficiency identified in this new study were female gender, advanced age (80+ years), smoking, non-white ethnicity, obesity and poor self-reported health. Researchers therefore identified a profile of older people more likely to be at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Being of a healthy weight, retired, engaging in regular vigorous physical activity, vitamin D supplement use, sun travel in past 12 months and summer season were positive determinants, and therefore potentially protective factors against vitamin D deficiency in older people.The findings were based on 6004 midlife and older adults, living at Northern latitudes (England, 50-55oN) derived from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Since UVB radiation (sunlight) is a known determinant of vitamin D status, this was investigated. Interestingly, residents in the South of England had a reduced risk of deficiency, compared with the North, even after adjustment for socioeconomic and other predictors of vitamin D status.This new research demonstrates that vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in older adult populations living at Northern latitudes and highlights the importance of public health strategies throughout midlife and older age to achieve optimal vitamin D status.Related StoriesSunscreen benefits can be obtained without compromising vitamin D levelsVitamin D deficiency at birth increases risk of high blood pressure in childrenVitamin D could extend lifespan of cancer patientsAssociate Professor in Nutrition at Trinity College, Maria O’Sullivan commented ‘Our study identified factors associated with vitamin D deficiency, including being aged 80+ years, obesity and sedentary lifestyles; all of which are increasing traits in western populations. Furthermore, this is one of the few studies to highlight the importance of non-white ethnicity in vitamin D deficiency in a large study of aging. The findings are valuable in developing targeted strategies to eliminate vitamin D deficiency (at 30nmol/L) in older populations’.First Author Dr Niamh Aspell, who conducted the study as part of her PhD at Trinity said: Source:Trinity College DublinJournal reference:Aspell, N. et al. (2019) The Prevalence and Determinants of Vitamin D Status in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Nutrients. doi.org/10.3390/nu11061253. Co-Author and Trinity Research Fellow Dr Eamon Laird, said: The high rates of deficiency are similar to rates seen in other high latitude countries such as Ireland. However, other more northern countries such as Finland have implemented a successful vitamin D fortification policy which has all but eliminated deficiency in the population. Such a policy could easily be implemented in the UK and Ireland.”last_img read more

first_img Explore further France is ready to consider cutting its stake in Renault in the interests of consolidating the automaker’s alliance with Nissan, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Saturday. © 2019 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Renault tries to reassure partner Nissan on Fiat planscenter_img Citation: France ready to cut Renault stake to shore up Nissan partnership: minister (2019, June 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-france-ready-renault-staketo-shore.html Le Maire said Renault should concentrate on forging closer ties with Nissan before seeking other alliances He was speaking in Japan after Italian-US carmaker Fiat Chrysler pulled the plug on its proposed merger with Renault, saying negotiations had become “unreasonable” due to political resistance in Paris.In an interview with AFP on the sidelines of the G20 finance ministers meeting in Japan, Le Maire said Paris might consider reducing the state’s 15-percent stake in Renault if it led to a “more solid” alliance between the Japanese and French firms.”We can reduce the state’s stake in Renault’s capital. This is not a problem as long as, at the end of the process, we have a more solid auto sector and a more solid alliance between the two great car manufacturers Nissan and Renault,” he told AFP.Last week, FCA stunned the auto world with a proposed “merger of equals” with Renault that would—together with Renault’s Japanese partners Nissan and Mitsubishi Motors—create a car giant spanning the globe. The combined group would have been by far the world’s biggest, with total sales of some 15 million vehicles, compared to both Volkswagen and Toyota, which sell around 10.6 million apiece.But the deal collapsed suddenly on Thursday, with FCA laying the blame at the door of Paris. “It has become clear that the political conditions in France do not currently exist for such a combination to proceed successfully,” FCA said in a statement.Le Maire said Renault should concentrate on forging closer ties with its Japanese partner Nissan before seeking other alliances.Things need to be done “in the right order…. First the alliance (between Nissan and Renault) should be consolidated and then consolidation (more generally) and not one before the other.””Otherwise, everything risks collapsing like a house of cards,” he warned.The minister said it would be up to the bosses of Renault and Nissan to decide how to push the alliance forward as ties between the two firms have been strained after the shock arrest of former boss Carlos Ghosn.Renault is pushing for a full merger between the pair but there is deep scepticism of the plan at Nissan.There were varied reactions from the French unions Saturday.”The government is behaving like the agent of the big shareholders, favouring short-term profit to the detriment of the interests of the country,” said Fabien Gache, of the CGT union.Cutting the state’s share in Renault was abandoning its responsibility in the country’s auto industry, he argued.Franck Daout of the CFDT union said it backed a three-way alliance between Renault, Nissan and Japan’s Mitsubishi—but not one between Nissan and Renault until the alliance had reached a “safe and sustainable maturity”.last_img read more