first_img Categories: Glenn News State Reps. Gary Glenn, left, and Lee Chatfield provided testimony to the House Tax Policy Committee April 15 on their legislation to prohibit Michigan Economic Growth Authority tax credits beyond the state’s current $9.38 billion liability. The bills were unanimously approved today by the committee and now go to the House for consideration.Michigan House Tax Policy Committee members today voted unanimously in favor of legislation to protect taxpayers from additional financial liability through Michigan Economic Growth Authority (MEGA) tax credit extensions.The committee includes state Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, who introduced House Bill 4334 to prohibit extensions currently allowed under the Michigan Business Tax Act. The committee also approved HB 4333, which addresses similar language in the Michigan Economic Growth Authority Act.“The MEGA credits and program expansion did what was intended at a time when Michigan was struggling through the recession by retaining the key industries and jobs that are now helping our state lead the nation’s economic rebound,” Rep. Glenn said. “While those past financial commitments can be honored with gratitude we must now look to ensure a fiscally responsible and realistic future that is stable and sustainable for Michigan taxpayers.”The MEGA tax credits were greatly expanded in 2008, and even though the program was ended by the Republican-led Legislature and Gov. Rick Snyder in 2011, there is a taxpayer liability of $9.38 billion projected over the next 17 years, including a $325 million state obligation this budget year.Current state law allows the existing credits to be increased and extended further, but the legislation approved today by the committee will freeze the existing program and its credit liabilities.HB 4333-4334 now go to the full House for consideration. 29Apr House committee approves Rep. Glenn bill to prohibit MEGA tax credit extensionslast_img read more

first_img“We are on the cusp of curing aging.” Those are the words of molecular biologist Dr. William Andrews, founder and CEO of Sierra Sciences, a company with the stated goal to “cure aging or die trying.” In the quote above, which comes from a September 2010 Sierra Sciences press release, Andrews is referring to a nutraceutical (i.e., a natural food-derived product meant to provide health or medical benefits, like vitamin C or folic acid) that his company discovered, known as TA-65. It supposedly slows down the aging process in humans by activating an enzyme called telomerase. Telomerase acts on telomeres—simple repeating sequences of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA) found at the tips of chromosomes that are important to cell division and replication. Cells must replicate their genes accurately and completely whenever they divide, or the so-called daughter cell will malfunction and die. However, most DNA polymerases (the enzymes that replicate DNA) cannot copy chromosomes all the way to the end. Thus, during each cell division, a small region at the tip of the chromosome (part of the telomere) remains uncopied. So, the telomeres have a crucial function: they act as a buffer zone during cell division, protecting the genes in the chromosome and ensuring that they fully replicate. But there’s a cost: successive divisions cause the telomeres to erode over time. When telomeres erode away, parts of critical genes remain uncopied, eventually spelling death for the cell. Some scientists think that this telomere erosion is what imposes a limit on our lifespans and causes our health to decline as we age; they also think that an answer to this dilemma might be telomerase activation. Telomerase combats telomere erosion by adding telomeric subunits (repeating sequences of nucleotides) to the ends of the chromosome, thereby allowing it to continue to divide intact. The origin of telomerase still remains a mystery. It appears to be critical during human embryonic development, but then fades away. Little is found in the body after birth, for reasons we don’t yet understand. Some scientists, like Dr. Andrews, think telomerase activation could be the cure for aging that his company is looking for, and he views TA-65 as a potential big first step in that direction. According to Andrews: TA-65 is going to go down in history as the first supplement you can take that doesn’t merely extend your life a few years by improving your health, but actually affects the underlying mechanisms of aging. Better telomerase inducers will be developed in the coming years, but TA-65 is the first of a whole new family of telomerase-activating therapies that could eventually keep us young and healthy forever. Well, if proven true, that’s a game-changer, to say the least. Just keep on living until you meet with a fatal accident. Woo hoo! But… hold on. Turns out we shouldn’t get irrationally exuberant just yet. It might not be such a good idea to activate telomerase, after all—because of the role it seems to play in cancer. Cancers can arise when genetic mutations inside a cell cause it to escape from normal controls on replication and migration. The cell and its offspring multiply uncontrollably while invading and damaging nearby tissue. With the presence of telomerase, cancerous cells—which apparently synthesize the enzyme—avoid telomere erosion. They essentially become immortal, dividing for as long as the host survives. A 2012 study by the MD Anderson Cancer Center found that activating telomerase following telomere degradation actually made tumors stronger and more deadly. So alas, TA-65 and telomerase activation might not be the miracle aging “cure” Dr. Andrews was hoping for. But what about other areas of anti-aging/longevity research? There’s a lot of talk these days about humans becoming essentially immortal in the near future, but is the hype supported by any actual research? Let’s see. The Quest for Immortality Continues People have been obsessed with the idea of immortality and living forever for centuries. According to Adam Gollner in The Book of Immortality: The Science, Belief, and Magic Behind Living Forever: The twenty-five-year old Emperor Ai of Jin died in 365 CE, after overdosing on longevity drugs. He wasn’t the last leader to die trying to live forever. The fascination with chemical immortality reached an ironic apogee centuries later, during the T’ang dynasty (618-907 CE), when elixirs poisoned those hoping for precisely the opposite effect. In the late 1300s, legend has it that alchemist Nicolas Flamel created a “sorcerer’s stone” that was then used to produce a potion, the elixir of life, which is said to make the drinker immortal. The idea was so alluring that despite a complete lack of evidence to support the existence of the stone and the elixir, other scientists, including the great Sir Isaac Newton, later tried to replicate Flamel’s results. To no avail. And of course there’s the fabled Fountain of Youth that became associated with Spanish explorer Ponce de León in the early 1500s. We know what happened to him. People today are no different. Not wanting to die is as natural as life itself. Below we’ll present a few interesting discoveries that may (or may not) mark some progress in our quest to live forever. But first we must answer a question. What Is Anti-Aging Medicine? The telomere erosion we talked about earlier certainly plays a part in aging, but most scientists don’t believe that it’s the only factor. They typically view aging as a sort of ongoing cellular wear and tear, where stresses from the environment and inside our cells (such as errors in DNA replication) accumulate throughout life and eventually wear out our cells and tissues. Scientists who search for a modern anti-aging elixir seek to slow down or reverse this process in order to extend both the maximum and average lifespan of people. And even if that doesn’t pan out, advocates of anti-aging medicine contend that at the least, targeting and altering the underlying mechanisms of aging will bring us more efficient ways to deal with age-related conditions like heart disease and many cancers. Now critics dispute the portrayal of aging itself as a disease, of course, but that’s not for us to debate here. Let’s just agree with the commonly stated goal of anti-aging medicine, to “add more years to your life, and life to your years.” Caloric Restriction Mimetics In 1934, scientists at Cornell University found that mice on an abnormally low-calorie diet lived about twice as long as mice who ate as much as they wanted. Scientists have since found that this caloric restriction also lengthens the lives of fruit flies, rats, and even primates, suggesting that this is an avenue worth pursuing in anti-aging medicine. The going (very basic) hypothesis of why these animals live longer is that their bodies treat food scarcity as an extreme type of stress. So they mount a physiological response to cope with the lack of nutrition. And that toughens them up, promoting health and longevity during the time of deprivation, even if that time is significantly extended. Starving yourself in order to get stronger? That sure seems counterintuitive. But the results from numerous experiments make a compelling case. The problem with caloric restriction is that it’s not a very pleasant way to live if you’re fortunate enough to be able to consume a “normal” amount of food on a regular basis (which is between 2,400 and 3,000 calories a day for active males). So scientists are trying to develop drugs (called caloric restriction mimetic drugs) that re-create the anti-aging benefits of caloric restriction without having to change one’s diet. Resveratrol, which is found in the skin of red grapes, was an early favorite in this category. It was first thought to activate a class of enzymes called sirtuins that have been associated with the anti-aging benefits of caloric restriction; but more recent studies have raised serious doubts about whether this compound (and more potent versions of it) actually activates these enzymes and has life-extending benefits. A drug called rapamycin has shown more promise as a caloric restriction mimetic by inhibiting a molecular signaling pathway called TOR. The TOR pathway acts as sort of as a food sensor and helps regulate the body’s response to nutrient availability. Blocking it has been shown on multiple occasions to extend the lifespan of lab knockout mice while keeping them lean and healthy in their later years. Unfortunately, however, the drug’s anti-aging potential in humans is offset by its potent immunosuppressant effects. Overall, research in this field has a long way to go. NAD As we noted above, aging is a sort of cellular wear and tear. According to Dr. David Sinclair of Harvard Medical School, there’s a specific biological signal that accompanies aging and tells cells it’s time to check out. It’s triggered when the cell perceives a lack of oxygen. That makes the mitochondria less efficient at converting fuel (such as glucose) into the ATP needed for cells to function properly. But Sinclair and his colleagues recently found a way to counteract that signal. Using a natural chemical compound called NAD, they were able to revive older cells in mice and make them appear energetic and young again. After receiving NAD for just one week, two-year-old mice tissue came to resemble that of six-month-old mice. “When we give the molecule, the cells think oxygen levels are normal and everything revs back up again,” Sinclair explained. “If a body is slowly falling apart and losing the ability to regulate itself effectively, we can get it back on track to what it was in its 20s and 30s.” Let’s hope. FOXO Molecular biologist Cynthia Kenyon thinks she may have found another of the keys to a long life through her study of tiny worms called C. elegans. By tweaking just one gene in these worms (to simply make it more active), she was able to take two-week-old C. elegans (which is a creaky old age for these things) and make them appear about half that age. And her modified worms lived twice as long as the normal worms. “So they’re like 90-year-old people who look 45,” said Kenyon. The gene Kenyon changed: FOXO. FOXO is a sort of master gene that helps C. elegans protect and repair its tissues (and live longer) by controlling a number of other genes. According to Kenyon: You can think of it as a superintendent of a building. So if you have a building, a nice big building, obviously it has to be maintained. What FOXO does, or the building superintendent does, is to keep the building in good working order. It makes sure that the walls are painted, by hiring painters; it makes sure that the floors are swept. The building superintendent would hire workers to do these different things. What FOXO does, in the cell, is it switches on other genes … I’d say, altogether, there are probably about a hundred worker genes that have very important roles. And, together, what you get is a cell or tissue or an animal that stays in really good working condition for a lot longer. What’s particularly exciting about Kenyon’s work is that the FOXO gene is also found in humans, and that a more protective version of FOXO (as in Kenyon’s modified worms) is associated with longer, healthier lives. Molecular biologist Timothy Donlon found in his studies that if you have this more protective version of FOXO, you have a twofold greater chance of living to 100. And if you have two copies of it, you have a threefold greater chance of living to 100, while remaining healthy. So the gene is indeed associated with adding life to your years and years to your life. If scientists could create a drug to tweak FOXO in humans like Kenyon did in her worms, it seems like we’d have an effective anti-aging medicine on our hands. We could go on with other examples of promising research in anti-aging medicine, but that’s a reasonable sample. It’s the ultimate area of scientific research, really. Moreover, it seems likely to bring benefits to humankind (and also be lucrative for savvy investors) whether aging is a disease that can be “cured” or not. And before leaving you today, I do want to remind you once more about the opportunity to get in on Casey OnePass. It’s just open until Monday, and it’s your only chance to get all eight of our newsletters for a huge discount. Click here to learn more and get started.last_img read more

first_img – NEW WARNING FROM DOUG CASEY – READ IMMEDIATELY Over the years, Doug Casey’s forecasts have caused a lot of controversy… Like during the peak of the dot-com bubble when he warned a major crash in tech stocks was near… Or near 2008 when he warned America’s financial structure would be threatened with collapse. Critics called him “offensive,” “brash,” “irreverent.” But Doug was spot-on, every time. Not only that… Folks who heeded his warnings had the opportunity to make rare and extraordinary gains of 770%, 1,333%, and more. Yet, those could be a drop in the bucket if his latest controversial forecast about President Trump is right. Click here for the full story. Recommended Links — WARNING: Don’t File Social Security Benefits Until You See This We just uncovered something shocking that could mean the difference between collecting a meager $1,000 from Social Security… Or getting up to $6,235 a month you can use for your retirement. That’s real cash deposited in your account… coming from the private sector. But according to a law that governs this special situation, you must act before April 21. Click here to get started today. Editor’s note: The “Greater Depression” has started… Yesterday, Casey Research founder Doug Casey compared what happened in the 1930s to what’s going on today. Below, he breaks down more of these likely differences… By Doug Casey, founder, Casey Research PRICES 1930s Prices dropped radically because billions of dollars of inflationary currency were wiped out through the stock market crash, bond defaults, and bank failures. The government, however, somehow equated the high prices of the inflationary ’20s with prosperity and attempted to prevent a fall in prices by such things as slaughtering livestock, dumping milk in the gutter, and enacting price supports. Since the collapse wiped out money faster than it could be created, the government felt the destruction of real wealth was a more effective way to raise prices. In other words, if you can’t increase the supply of money, decrease the supply of goods. Nonetheless, the 1930s depression was a deflationary collapse, a time when currency became worth more and prices dropped. This is probably the most confusing thing to most Americans since they assume—as a result of that experience—that “depression” means “deflation.” It’s also perhaps the biggest single difference between this depression and the last one. Today Prices could drop, as they did the last time, but the amount of power the government now has over the economy is far greater than what was the case 80 years ago. Instead of letting the economy cleanse itself by allowing the financial markets to collapse, governments will probably bail out insolvent banks, create mortgages wholesale to prop up real estate, and central banks will buy bonds to keep their prices from plummeting. All of these actions mean that the total money supply will grow enormously. Trillions will be created to avoid deflation. If you find men selling apples on street corners, it won’t be for 5 cents apiece, but $5 apiece. But there won’t be a lot of apple sellers because of welfare, nor will there be a lot of apples because of price controls. Consumer prices will probably skyrocket as a result, and the country will have an inflationary depression. Unlike the 1930s, when people who held dollars were king, by the end of the Greater Depression, people with dollars will be wiped out. THE SOCIETY 1930s The world was largely rural or small-town. Communications were slow, but people tended to trust the media. The government exercised considerable moral suasion, and people tended to support it. The business of the country was business, as Calvin Coolidge said, and men who created wealth were esteemed. All told, if you were going to have a depression, it was a rather stable environment for it; despite that, however, there were still plenty of riots, marches, and general disorder. Today The country is now urban and suburban, and although communications are rapid, there’s little interpersonal contact. The media are suspect. The government is seen more as an adversary or an imperial ruler than an arbitrator accepted by a consensus of concerned citizens. Businessmen are viewed as unscrupulous predators who take advantage of anyone weak enough to be exploited. A major financial smashup in today’s atmosphere could do a lot more than wipe out a few naives in the stock market and unemploy some workers, as occurred in the ’30s; some sectors of society are now time bombs. It’s hard to say, for instance, what third- and fourth-generation welfare recipients are going to do when the going gets really tough. THE WAY PEOPLE WORK 1930s Relatively slow transportation and communication localized economic conditions. The U.S. itself was somewhat insulated from the rest of the world, and parts of the U.S. were fairly self-contained. Workers were mostly involved in basic agriculture and industry, creating widgets and other tangible items. There wasn’t a great deal of specialization, and that made it easier for someone to move laterally from one occupation into the next, without extensive retraining, since people were more able to produce the basics of life on their own. Most women never joined the workforce, and the wife in a marriage acted as a “backup” system should the husband lose his job. Today The whole world is interdependent, and a war in the Middle East or a revolution in Africa can have a direct and immediate effect on a barber in Chicago or Krakow. Since the whole economy is centrally controlled from Washington, a mistake there can be a national disaster. People generally aren’t in a position to roll with the punches as more than half the people in the country belong to what is known as the “service economy.” That means, in most cases, they’re better equipped to shuffle papers than make widgets. Even “necessary” services are often terminated when times get hard. Specialization is part of what an advanced industrial economy is all about, but if the economic order changes radically, it can prove a liability. THE FINANCIAL MARKETS 1930s The last depression is identified with the collapse of the stock market, which lost over 90% of its value from 1929 to 1933. A secure bond was the best possible investment as interest rates dropped radically. Commodities plummeted, reducing millions of farmers to near subsistence levels. Since most real estate was owned outright and taxes were low, a drop in price didn’t make a lot of difference unless you had to sell. Land prices plummeted, but since people bought it to use, not unload to a greater fool, they didn’t usually have to sell. Today This time, stocks—and especially commodities—are likely to explode on the upside as people panic into them to get out of depreciating dollars in general and bonds in particular. Real estate will be—next to bonds—the most devastated single area of the economy because no one will lend money long term. And real estate is built on the mortgage market, which will vanish. Everybody who invests in this depression thinking that it will turn out like the last one will be very unhappy with the results. Being aware of the differences between the last depression and this one makes it a lot easier to position yourself to minimize losses and maximize profits. So much for the differences. The crucial, obvious, and most important similarity, however, is that most people’s standard of living will fall dramatically. The Greater Depression has started. Most people don’t know it because they can neither confront the thought nor understand the differences between this one and the last. As a climax approaches, many of the things that you’ve built your life around in the past are going to change and change radically. The ability to adjust to new conditions is the sign of a psychologically healthy person. Look for the opportunity side of the crisis. The Chinese symbol for “crisis” is a combination of two other symbols—one for danger and one for opportunity. The dangers that society will face in the years ahead are regrettable, but there’s no point in allowing anxiety, frustration, or apathy to overcome you. Face the future with courage, curiosity, and optimism rather than fear. You can be a winner, and if you plan carefully, you will be. The great period of change will give you a chance to regain control of your destiny. And that in itself is the single most important thing in life. This depression can give you that opportunity; it’s one of the many ways the Greater Depression can be a very good thing for both you as an individual and society as a whole. Editor’s note: America is about to enter a crisis far more severe than what we saw in 2008–2009. It could all start after Trump’s inauguration and could change everything… in sudden, unexpected ways. This is exactly why Doug and his team put together a time-sensitive video explaining how it could all go down. Click here to watch it now.last_img read more

first_img Explore further Britain called for a first-of-its-kind watchdog for social media that could fine executives and even ban companies. And a European Union parliamentary committee approved a bill giving internet companies an hour to remove terror-related material or face fines that could reach into the billions.”We are forcing these firms to clean up their act once and for all,” said British Home Secretary Sajid Javid, whose department collaborated on Britain’s proposal.Opponents warned the British and EU measures could stifle innovation and strengthen the dominance of technology giants because smaller companies won’t have the money to comply. That, in turn, could turn Google and Facebook into the web’s censors, they said.The push to make the big companies responsible for the torrent of material they carry has largely been driven by Europeans. But it picked up momentum after the March 15 mosque shootings in New Zealand that killed 50 people and were livestreamed for 17 minutes. Facebook said it removed 1.5 million videos of the attacks in the 24 hours afterward.The U.S., where government action is constrained by the First Amendment right to free speech and freedom of the press, has taken a more hands-off approach, though on Tuesday, a House committee will press Google and Facebook executives on whether they are doing enough to curb the spread of hate crimes and white nationalism.Australia last week made it a crime for social media platforms not to quickly remove “abhorrent violent material.” The offense would be punishable by three years in prison and a fine of 10.5 million Australian dollars ($7.5 million), or 10% of the platform’s annual revenue, whichever is larger. New Zealand’s Privacy Commissioner wants his country to so the same.The British plan would require social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter to protect people who use their sites from “harmful content.” The plan, which includes the creation of an independent regulator funded by a tax on internet companies, will be subject to public comment for three months before the government publishes draft legislation. Citation: Facebook, Google face widening crackdown over online content (2019, April 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-facebook-google-widening-crackdown-online.html Tech giants like Facebook and Google came under increasing pressure in Europe on Monday when countries proposed stricter rules to force them to block extreme material such as terrorist propaganda and child porn. In this April 18, 2017 file photo, conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook’s annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. The U.K. for the first time on Monday April 8, 2019, proposed direct regulation of social media companies, with senior executives potentially facing fines if they fail to block damaging content such as terrorist propaganda or images of child abuse. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File) “No one in the world has done this before, and it’s important that we get it right,” Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright told the BBC.Facebook’s head of public policy in Britain, Rebecca Stimson, said the goal of the new rules should be to protect society while also supporting innovation and freedom of speech.”These are complex issues to get right, and we look forward to working with the government and Parliament to ensure new regulations are effective,” she said.Britain will consider imposing financial penalties similar to those under the EU’s online data privacy law, which permits fines of up to 4% of a company’s annual worldwide revenue, Wright said. In extreme cases, the government may also seek to fine individual company directors and prevent companies from operating in Britain.Under the EU legislation that cleared an initial hurdle in Brussels, any internet companies that fail to remove terrorist content within an hour of being notified by authorities would face similar 4% penalties. EU authorities came up with the idea last year after attacks highlighted the growing trend of online radicalization.The bill would apply to companies providing services to EU citizens, whether or not those businesses are based in the EU’s 28 member countries. It still needs further approval, including from the full European Parliament.It faces heavy opposition from digital rights organizations, tech industry groups and some lawmakers, who said the 60-minute deadline is impractical and would lead companies to go too far and remove even lawful material.”Instead, we call for a more pragmatic approach with removals happening ‘as soon as possible,’ to protect citizens’ rights and competitiveness,” said EDIMA, a European trade group for new media and internet companies.Opponents said the measure also places a bigger burden on smaller internet companies than on giants like Facebook and Google, which already have automated content filters. To help smaller web companies, the bill was modified to give them an extra 12 hours for their first offense, a measure opponents said didn’t go far enough.Mark Skilton, a professor at England’s Warwick Business School, urged regulators to pursue new methods such as artificial intelligence that could do a better job of tackling the problem.”Issuing large fines and hitting companies with bigger legal threats is taking a 20th-century bullwhip approach to a problem that requires a nuanced solution,” he said. “It needs machine learning tools to manage the 21st-century problems of the internet.”Wright said Britain’s proposed social-media regulator would be expected to take freedom of speech into account while trying to prevent harm.”What we’re talking about here is user-generated content, what people put online, and companies that facilitate access to that kind of material,” he said. “So this is not about journalism. This is about an unregulated space that we need to control better to keep people safer.” UK takes aim at social networks that fail to quash ‘hateful’ content This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_img Image Gallery: How Technology Reveals Hidden Art Treasures 7 Amazing Places to Visit with Google Street View Satellite images of the buried ancient Egyptian city Tanis revealed city walls that were invisible to archaeologists on the ground. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak An eye inlay from a tomb dating to 4,000 years ago, in Lisht, Egypt. The expedition, co-led by Dr. Parcak, was conducted in partnership with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak Satellites analyze landscapes and use different parts of the light spectrum to uncover buried remnants of ancient civilizations. But studying archaeological sites from above had very humble (and low-tech) beginnings, Parcak told Live Science. Researchers first experimented with peering down from a great height at a historic location more than a century ago, when a member of the Corps of Royal Engineers photographed the 5,000-year-old monument Stonehenge from a hot-air balloon. “You could even see — from this very early and somewhat blurry photograph — staining in the landscape around the site, showing that there were buried features there,” Parcak said. Through the 1960s and into the 1970s, aerial photography continued to play an important role in archaeology. But when NASA launched its first satellites it opened up “a completely new world,” for archaeologists in the 1980s and 1990s, Parcak said. In fact, declassified images from the U.S. government’s Corona spy satellite program, which operated from 1959 to 1972, helped archaeologists in the 1990s to reconstruct the positions of important sites in the Middle East that had since disappeared, eradicated by urban expansion. In Photos: Ancient Egyptian Tombs Decorated with Creaturescenter_img If these stories of space archaeology in Parcak’s book leave readers wanting more, they’re in luck. An online platform called GlobalXplorer, launched and run by Parcak, offers users access to a library of satellite images for browsing and annotation. Aspiring “citizen-scientists” can join “campaigns” to assist in the ongoing search for lost cities and ancient structures, and to help experts identify signs of looting in vulnerable sites, according to the platform website. Since 2017, approximately 80,000 users have evaluated 14 million satellite images, mapping 700 major archaeological sites that were previously unknown, Parcak said. “Archaeology From Space” is available to buy on Amazon. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo What does it take to be a space archaeologist? No, you don’t need a rocket or a spacesuit. However, lasers are sometimes involved. And infrared cameras. And spy satellites. Welcome to Sarah Parcak’s world. Parcak, an archaeologist and a professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has mapped sites around the world from space; she does so using images captured by satellites — from NASA and from private companies — orbiting high above the ground. From these lofty heights, sensitive instruments can reveal details that are invisible to scientists on the ground, marking the positions of walls or even entire cities that have been buried for millennia. Parcak unpacks how views from space are transforming the field of archaeology, in her new book “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019). [Read an excerpt from “Archaeology From Space”] AdvertisementArchaeology Gets a Sci-Fi Makeover, In ‘Archaeology From Space’Live Science sits down with archaeologist and author Sarah Parcak to talk about her new book, “”Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019).Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65924-space-archaeology-highlights.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0020:0420:04Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  Today, aerial or satellite images captured by optical lenses, thermal cameras, infrared and lidar — light detection and ranging, a type of laser system — are well-established as part of an archaeologist’s tool kit. And archaeologists need as many tools as they can get; there are thought to be millions of sites around the world that are yet to be discovered, Parcak added. But remote sensing isn’t one-size-fits-all; different terrains require different space archaeology techniques. For example, in Egypt, layers of sand blanket lost pyramids and cities. In that type of landscape, high-resolution optical satellites reveal subtle differences on the surface that may hint at structures underground. And in regions with dense vegetation, such as in Southeast Asia or Central America, lidar emits millions of pulses of light to penetrate beneath the trees and detect hidden buildings, Parcak explained. In her own work, Parcak’s analysis of satellite views led to the creation of a new map for the legendary city of Tanis in Egypt, famously featured in the movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” Satellite images of Tanis revealed a vast network of the city’s buildings, which had previously gone undetected even as the site was under excavation, she wrote.last_img read more

first_imgOver 32,000 employees of the Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport Undertaking are on strike since last Tuesday   –  Prashant Waydande COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL Protest enters seventh day; over 3,200 buses off the roads RELATED January 14, 2019 Maharashtra SHARE strike Mumbai bus strike enters 6th day Published on COMMENTS Opposition parties on Monday hit out at the BJP and Shiv Sena for the BEST bus strike which entered its seventh day in the metropolis even as an official of the civic-run transport undertaking expressed hope that a High Court hearing later in the day will provide a solution.Over 32,000 employees of the Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport Undertaking (BEST) are on strike since Tuesday last week and 3200-odd buses in its fleet are off the roads.Striking workers are demanding the merger of BEST’s budget with the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, the former’s parent body, as well as higher wages.Talks over the last week between a State government committee led by the Maharashtra Chief Secretary and striking BEST unions have failed to break the impasse.The Nationalist Congress Party and the Aam Aadmi Party on Monday questioned the motives of the ruling BJP-Shiv Sena alliance and asked why the strike had been allowed to linger on for a week.NCP spokesperson Nawab Malik on Monday said, “BEST strike enters 7th day to promote wet leasing of buses to benefit Shiv Sena leaders. Similar ploy was played in Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation (MSRTC) buses. The Shiv Sena should clarify how many buses belong to their leaders.”He added: “The BJP will also hand over electric supply to their friend Adani. The Shiv Sena and the BJP are holding Mumbaikars to ransom to benefit their leadership.”Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) leader Preeti Sharma Menon, while expressing her party’s support to workers, alleged the State government was “anti-labour”.“We support the demands of the strikers and are shocked that the government is unaffected by the longest BEST strike ever. This government is anti-labour. It had also turned a deaf ear to the MSRTC’s strike last year,” she said.last_img read more