first_img<a href=”https://eventmarketing.wufoo.com/forms/s1cbryzy072cjxp/” title=”html form”>Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> For all the buzz in the media industry about the mounting vitality of maintaining a unified, organized, and practical audience database, most publishers’ systems for managing such data remain rudimentary at best. To gain a better understanding of where most publishers fall on the spectrum of data-literacy — and how they expect their needs to evolve in the coming months and years — Folio: surveyed publishers, marketing directors, and editors from across the media and publishing space. The results highlight what could be a major missed opportunity for publishers and media companies looking to stay ahead in a rapidly changing industry.center_img Also included is our Marketplace Snapshot: a survey of the handful of companies offering data-management solutions to the industry, and a table of the different products and services offered by each.last_img read more

first_imgNasscom has urged policymakers from the European Union (EU) and the UK to adopt measures to alleviate impact of Britain’s exit (Brexit) on the Indian IT services exporting sector, says a PTI report.”NASSCOM urges policy makers in Brussels and London to provide greater clarity and guidance on the next steps as soon as possible, so that our businesses have the certainty they need to continue to invest in UK and Europe,” NASSCOM President R Chandrashekhar was quoted as saying.Indian IT companies expressed concern over short-term risks to businesses as they get ready to pull through the consequences of Brexit from the EU.Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka said the company was “watching the situation closely” and that he was expecting a possible short-term impact on currency and business.The company’s chairman R Sheshasayee told the Economic Times that political events like Brexit are beyond the scope of business operations but added that the company is working on “hedging strategies” to temper macro level risks. “There is also an immediate impact due to the currency, the GBP has already fallen by 8-10%,” said Sangeeta Gupta, senior vice president of Nasscom.Wipro was quoted as saying that the immediate risks were labour mobility, currency fluctuation and a different financial system.”Wipro has been present in the UK for over two decades and today employs over 4,000 people there. We remain committed to the UK and are optimistic that the close ties between India and the UK will further strengthen in the long run and open up new opportunities for us,” the company said.There was no comment from TCS and HCL.A 2016 Grant Thornton India Tracker report provided a picture of Indian business scene in Britain. India’s investment in the UK increased 65% in 2015, making it the third largest FDI source for the country, says the report.Two IT companies figured in the report’s list of largest Indian employers. HCL Technologies was named the 7th largest employer with above 3,100 employees, while Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) took a close 8th place with more than 3,000 employees.The report also said the combined tax revenue payed by the Indian firms to the UK went up by £150 million in 2015 compared to the previous year.Echoing Nasscom’s earlier warnings, Ganesha Natarajan, former vice-chairman of Zensar Technologies, said: “Lots of UK companies have trans Europe operations, Britain’s exit will mean reorganization and impact on their business volumes as well, it would shrink their wallets and thereby spending on IT will be hit immediately.”last_img read more

first_imgMajor Rohingya refugee camp populations in Bangladesh. AFPA plan to start repatriating Rohingya Muslims back to Myanmar is premature and the refugees are “terrified” about leaving Bangladesh where they sought refuge, dozens of aid agencies working in the region said Friday.More than 720,000 Rohingya Muslims fled Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state after a heavyhanded army crackdown in August last year that survivors say involved mass rape and extrajudicial killings.UN officials say the country’s military leaders should be investigated for genocide but Myanmar has rebuffed the calls, arguing it was only defending itself against Rohingya militants who attacked police posts.Both Bangladesh and Myanmar signed a repatriation agreement in November last year to allow Rohingya to return but many fear going back without guarantees of citizenship, freedom of movement and safety.However the governments confirmed in recent weeks that they were pushing ahead with the first large-scale repatriation set for mid-November, prompting an outcry from activists who say conditions on the ground in Rakhine are not adequate to take the refugees back.Rohingya Camp”They are terrified about what will happen to them if they are returned to Myanmar now, and distressed by the lack of information they have received,” the group of 42 aid agencies and civil society groups said in a statement that referred to the push as “dangerous.””They fled to Bangladesh to seek safety and they are very grateful to the Government of Bangladesh for giving them a safe haven.”Oxfam, World Vision and Save the Children were among the groups working in Myanmar and Bangladesh that signed the statement.They said refugees fear living in enclosed settlements like the one in central Rakhine state, where more than 120,000 Rohingya have been confined to camps for six years since intercommunal violence erupted in the region in 2012.Myint Khaing, the Maungdaw township administrator in northern Rakhine, told AFP that November 15 is the estimated repatriation start date and that the plan is to receive more than 2,200 people in total at a rate of 150 per day.But he seemed unsure if it would go ahead.”We can confirm only on the 15th whether the people from our given list are coming or not,” he said.Northern Rakhine has been largely sealed off since the crackdown except for tightly organised government trips for media and senior visiting diplomats.The UN has been granted access to the area to assess conditions on the ground but the approvals have been slow and the amount of territory accessible has been limited.Authorities in Bangladesh worry that Rohingya may once again risk travelling to other parts of Southeast Asia by boat, a route previously popular with those seeking economic opportunities outside the grim camps.This week Bangladesh’s coast guard rescued 33 Rohingyas and detained six alleged human traffickers from a fishing trawler headed for Malaysia in the Bay of Bengal.last_img read more