first_img7:38 OnePlus was “inspired by classic geometric progression” for its TV logo. OnePlus OnePlus sought ideas for the name of its smart TV from fans shortly after revealing its plans to enter that market last September. It announced its decision Wednesday in its forum: OnePlus TV. Along with this “simple yet to-the-point” name, the Chinese company opted for a straightforward logo, by adding “TV” to its standard symbol.”We believe there’s no other name that can best represent our value, vision and pride than naming it with our own brand,” a spokesperson wrote.The post didn’t hint at the OnePlus TV’s release date, but The Next Web reports it’ll launch in September. OnePlus didn’t immediately respond to a request for further comment.Earlier this month, MySmartPrice highlighted a Bluetooth SIG listing that refers to OnePlus’ offering as a “unique Android TV” that uses an LED display, rather than OLED, along with hints that it’ll range in size from 43 to 75 inches. We dunk the OnePlus 7 Pro underwater Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice TVs Tech Industry Post a comment 24 Photos Originally published at 3:02 a.m. PT.Update, 3:20 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. 0 OnePlus OnePlus 7 Pro is big, blue and budget friendly Tagslast_img read more

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) — In a tale worthy of Sherlock Holmes, scientists in the School of Chemistry at the University of Bristol, UK have solved a biochemical mystery that had previously proven elusive for 70 years: How the fungus Talaromyces stipitatus produces stipitatic acid (6), which is a tropolone, one of an atypical group of fungal natural products – that is, small molecules produced by genetically encoded pathways – with a seven-carbon ring. (Most natural products, such as cholesterol or phenylalanine, have five or six carbons in rings.) The researchers used a two-part biosynthetic approach – gene deletion and alternate genetic expression – to investigate the molecular pathway in question. Professor Russell J. Cox, Postgraduate student Jack Davison and other researchers engaged in the study faced several long-standing obstacles to showing that 3-methylorcinaldehyde is the direct product of a fungal nonreducing polyketide synthase (NR-PKS) which most likely appends the methyl group from S-adenosyl methionine during biosynthesis of the tetraketide, and which uses a reductive release mechanism to produce the observed aldehyde. “Gene knockouts have been one of the most useful tools in the toolkit of the biosynthetic chemist,” Cox tells Phys.org, “but knockouts can’t answer complex questions like these. We now make extensive use of heterologous expression – that is, moving the gene to a ‘clean’ host and switching it on.”The scientists then monitor the host organism for the production of new compounds which we isolate and identify. The chemical structure of the new compound tells them a great deal about the chemistry which must have been used to make it. “In this case,” Cox continues, “we showed that the TropA gene encodes a polyketide synthase which makes 3-methylorcinaldehyde. Expression also allows us to do more complex experiments – for example, by truncating or mutating the gene – and in this way we discovered the reductive release mechanism and the fact that the programmed methylation occurs during chain extension rather than after chain-building and ring formation.”Tropolone biosynthesis was one of the longest-standing problems in the field of biosynthesis and some of the most distinguished organic chemists of the last century were fascinated by it, but progress had been very limited. “We realized that combining chemical knowledge with genome sequence data could give us the start we needed,” Cox explains. “We already knew a lot about polyketide biosynthesis in fungi, and this allowed us to narrow down the potential genes involved to just four. We then used chemical knowledge to narrow this further to a single gene cluster.” Proof then came from the knockout and expression studies. Explore further Copyright 2012 Phys.Org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. More information: Genetic, molecular, and biochemical basis of fungal tropolone biosynthesis, PNAS May 15, 2012 vol. 109 no. 20 7642-7647, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1201469109 Involvement of tspks1 (tropA) in the biosynthesis of methylorcinaldehyde and tropolones in T. stipitatus. PKS domains: SAT, starter unit acyl transferase; KAS, ketosynthase; AT, acyl transferase; PT, product template; ACP, acyl carrier protein; CMeT, C-methyl transferase; R, acyl CoA thiolester reductase. HPLC analysis of tspks1 KO: (A) UV chromatogram at 260 nm for WT T. stipitatus; (B) UV chromatogram at 260 nm for T. stipitatus tspks1 KO. HPLC analysis of tspks1 expression in A. oryzae: (C) UV chromatogram at 293 nm for untransformed A. oryzae; (D) UV chromatogram at 293 nm for A. oryzae expressing aspks1; (E) UV chromatogram at 293 nm for A. oryzae expressing tspks1. Copyright © PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1201469109 Looking ahead, the team is currently working on systematic methods to express many genes in fungi. “At present this is easy in bacteria, because in bacteria a single promoter can switch on lots of genes in parallel,” notes Cox. “In fungi, however, each gene needs its own promoter, so this has limited progress. In collaboration with our colleagues in the School of Biological Sciences at Bristol we’re developing systems which can express a dozen or so fungal genes in parallel. This will allow the researchers to investigate much more complex systems in the future.In addition, Cox adds, “I do believe that computational biology and chemistry will eventually provide answers to complex questions like this – but at the moment, while computational methods allow us to formulate good questions, lab work is still needed to find the answers. We’re working in an area with very many unknowns, so it’s difficult for computational methods which rely on current knowledge to act predictively with any accuracy. In fact,” notes Cox, “this is a powerful reason why fundamental discoveries are still so important: they’ll form the basis for future predictions.”Cox points out that he and his team will also continue to study the TropB-D enzymes in vitro. “Chemical methods of classical enzymology will allow us to determine their precise mechanisms.”Cox also articulates how comparing the T. stipitatus tropolone biosynthetic cluster with other known gene clusters allows clarification of important steps during the biosynthesis of other fungal compounds, including the xenovulenes, citrinin, sepedonin, sclerotiorin, and asperfuranone. “Fungal genomes generally are much bigger than their bacterial counterparts by roughly 10 times, and they contain many more genes and gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of complex compounds” he explains. “Barely any of the known fungal gene clusters have been linked to the molecules they must encode. Our work now allows the understanding of a set of genes which encodes the biosynthesis of polyketides followed by oxidative modifications and these occur frequently in fungi. Until now these clusters were mysterious, but now we can – at least partially – begin to understand what they may do. Secondly, knowledge of the gene clusters will allow us to go hunting for new clusters more effectively.” For example, puberulic acid is a potent antimalarial compound, but its gene cluster is unknown – and the team predicts that the cluster should be very similar to the T. stipitatus tropolone gene cluster.In terms of other research and applications that might benefit from their findings, Cox says that understanding biosynthetic pathways is a key strand of the new science of Synthetic Biology. “One can think of the gene clusters and biosynthetic enzymes they encode as building blocks of new biological entities. In the future,” he concludes, “it will be possible to combine the genetic and chemical knowledge of biosynthetic pathways to produce bioactive compounds – such as drugs and agrochemicals – using biology rather than chemistry. This offers huge advantages in terms of sustainability.” Citation: Friendly Fungi: Elucidating the fungal biosynthesis of stipitatic acid (2012, May 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-friendly-fungi-elucidating-fungal-biosynthesis.html How tropolones synthesized in fungi: 70-year-old chemical mystery solved This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img‘Pre-booking has started for Passport at Amazon and BlackBerry exclusive stores from Monday itself. Customers pre-booking at Amazon.in would receive a gift card worth Rs 5,000. It will be be available across stores from 10 October for Rs 49,990,’ BlackBerry India Managing Director Sunil Lalvani said at the launch event.BlackBerry Passport has 4.5 LCD touch screen and comes with a three row qwerty keypad which also has capacitative touch features embedded in it. Also Read – I-T issues 17-point checklist to trace unaccounted DeMO cash‘The keypad can be used for typing as well as navigation by swiping fingers on it for functions like delete, moving predictive words function up and down etc,’ Lalvani said. BlackBerry Passport comes with 3450 mAh non-removable battery which company said will support up to 14 hours of talktime in 2G network and video playback of up to 11 hours. The square-shaped handset has 13 megapixel main camera and 2 megapixel front camera. The internal storage capacity of the phone is 32 GB and supports 128 GB of external storage. Also Read – Lanka launches ambitious tourism programme to woo Indian touristsBlackBerry has targeted professionals who have heavy typing requirement through Passport. The phones total length is about 5-inch and width is about 3.5 inch. Though BlackBerry Passport is completely different in terms of design, it may see tough competition from premium smartphones like iPhone 5S, Sony Xperia Z3, HTC M8 etc.Another tough competition for the phone could be Samsung Note 4, which is yet to be launched in India.Before Passport, the company’s most expensive smartphone was Blackberry Q10 launched for about Rs 45,000 in June last year. The handset is now available in the market at around Rs 19,000 — less than half its launch price. The company had to reduce price of its handsets as there was a huge inventory pile up due to less of demand of BlackBerry phones sold at premium price. Lalvani said the price of BlackBerry Passport is going to stay because of its high quality components and specifications.‘We launched Z3 in June and there is no price change till date. We are getting good response. We had two price revisions of Z10 over period of 18 months. Its not a secret. We had to write down some inventory and we are now coming out of it. Passport is competitively and aggressively priced because of its specification,’ Lalvani said.last_img read more

first_imgDarjeeling: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Thursday announced the formation of an expert committee to look into different issues and problems pertaining to the tea industry. The committee will be handing over its recommendations and a report within three months. She also stated that the Land department will be soon preparing a law for distributing land rights to tea garden workers.The Chief Minister, while on a tour of North Bengal districts, held a meeting with different operating tea unions of the gardens at Uttar Kanya, the mini secretariat in the Jalpaiguri district on Thursday. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedLater, addressing a Press conference, she stated: “There are problems ailing the tea industry but we will have to find a permanent solution to the problems. We have constituted an expert committee with the Chief Secretary at the helm. The committee will submit a report within three months. The Land Reforms department will formulate a law for distributing pattas (land right documents) to tea garden workers.”She stated that there is exploitation in the tea gardens. “Some gardens declare lockouts as per their convenience. We will cancel lease of such tea gardens and will initiate criminal cases against the management not paying PF and gratuity of the workers,” retorted the Chief Minister. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPReacting to an ongoing agitation by the Joint Forum of Tea, a conglomeration of 26 tea unions demanding minimum wages for tea workers, Banerjee stated: “They only know how to call bandhs. Our government has been sincerely working for the workers. We have spent more than Rs 1,000 crore for the tea workers since 2011.”Adding to this, Malay Ghatak, minister in charge of the Labour department, stated: “During the Left Front regime, daily wages were hiked by Rs 1 and Rs 2. We incremented daily wages by Rs 37.50. At present, the daily wage cash component is Rs 159.” The Chief Minister stated that the government is negotiating with the management for a minimum daily wage of Rs 176. Another round of talks of the minimum wage committee will be held on Friday at Uttar Kanya to decide on the minimum wage issue, stated the Chief Minister.There are 2,72,000 workers in the tea gardens of West Bengal and another 8 lakh non-workers who live in the tea gardens.”We are extending different social security programmes in the tea gardens. For the nonworkers we have decided to impart skill development training. Tea tourism will be promoted as an alternative” said the Chief Minister.She added that relief is being provided to the workers in closed tea gardens, including free electricity and free drinking water, along with 35 kg of rice at Rs 2 per kg.last_img read more

first_imgToday, the Tor Project launched its annual end-of-year crowdfunding campaign ‘Strength in Numbers’ and it’s receiving support from Firefox maker Mozilla. The Tor network disguises a users identity by moving their traffic across different Tor servers, and encrypting that traffic so it isn’t traced back to them, thus “ensuring privacy and online freedom”. Started back in 2016, Tor’s Crowdfunding campaigns allow the community to realize the opportunity that Tor promises. Their vision to deliver significant advancements in the hidden services field aims to draw contributions from donors, further facilitating their participation in shaping the evolution of hidden services. Tor announced that Mozilla will match donations up to a total of $500,000. This means a significant portion of the donations Tor receives during this campaign will be automatically be doubled. This is not the first time that Mozilla, Tor’s long term ally, has supported its network. Its partnership with Tor helped the organization raise over $400,000 from a similar campaign. Mozilla’s support has been beneficial to Tor, who began soliciting ‘crowdfunded’ donations in 2015 to offset its reliance on government grants. 2018 has been a busy year for the Tor network who have always aimed to take a stand against restrictive online practices and foster privacy and online freedom to its users. In wake of the same, they build the Tor Browser 8 based on Firefox’s 2017 Quantum structure and the Tor Browser for Android  to reach out to users in nations that have tightened restrictions on free expression and accessing the open web and not much freedom is provided to its citizens. Looks like Mozilla has given them a good head start to continue their work in 2019. Tor plans to do the following in 2019 with community support: Improve the capacity, modularization, and scalability of the Tor network Make improvements and integrations into other privacy and circumvention tools easier and reliable Better test  and design solutions around internet censorship Strengthen the development of Tor Browser for Android And much more! You can head over to Tor’s official Blog to know more about this news. Read Next Tor Project gets its first official mobile browser for Android, the privacy friendly Tor Browser Tor Browser 8.0 powered by Firefox 60 ESR releasedlast_img read more