first_imgThe Grand Cape Mount County Health Team (CHT) has reported 14 deaths and  75 persons quarantined for allegedly coming into direct contact with suspected Ebola patients in the area.The report says that from January 1 to 6, the CHT recorded 14 deaths, which took place in Tienii, Gbesseh,  Jorjoama and Camp #3 in Tewor District, where the virus is said to be prevalent.Mr. Samuel Zayzay, Surveillance Officer for the county, gave the troubling report at the County Ebola Taskforce coordination meeting held in Robertsport last Wednesday, according to information reaching the Daily Observer.Meanwhile, Imam Mohammed A. Paasewe, County Superintendent, also disclosed that local authorities in collaboration with the CHT, national and international partners have set up Ebola awareness and prevention measures to fight the virus.In a related development, the Assistant Health Minister Tolbert Nyenswah said the government had sent a six-man technical team to the county to beef up the strength of the local Ebola Taskforce in eradicating the virus from the county.He said government’s decision to dispatch the team to the county was because of the constant outbreak of new Ebola cases there and the need for greater efforts to curb the virus.The six-man team will work with the CHT and local and international partners in fighting the further spread of the virus.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgAs the NDIT says, the parking lot currently operates at capacity, but does not generate any revenue. In the 2011 Airport Business Plan, upgrades to the parking area were estimated at $1.7 million, and upgrades to the airport near Fort Nelson were part of the infrastructure projects for which residents recently approved the borrowing of over $50 million. Tenders are due by August 22, 2013.- Advertisement –last_img

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champ“We love talking to the patients and getting to know them,” said Gibbs, whose mother underwent treatment for breast cancer nearly three years ago at Norris Cancer Center. The hospital’s patients were happy to see the Royal Court members. Juan Perez, who has leukemia, has been undergoing chemotherapy at Norris Cancer Center since April. Perez came for his treatment Tuesday accompanied by his 18-year-old son, David, and said they hadn’t expected to see local royalty. “It feels great,” Juan Perez said, as he pointed to the miniature rose sticker placed on his shirt. The Royal Court toured the hospital, spoke to physicians and visited the Image Enhancement Center, a specialty boutique for cancer patients. Consultants there provide information and advice to patients on appearance, everything from hair alternatives to proper skin care and prosthesis fitting. Princesses Chloe Ghoogassian and Courtney Rubin said visiting with patients is a small gesture but they believe it “lightens up their day,” Ghoogassian said. Darlene Chambers, a 17-year employee at Norris Cancer Center, agreed the yearly visit from the Royal Court is a positive experience for patients and hospital staff. Chambers, 55, is a patient at the hospital now, and said she enjoys talking with the girls and receiving the rose sticker. caroline.an@sgvn.com (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4494 www.insidesocal.com/schools 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! • Photo Gallery: Rose Court visits cancer patients LOS ANGELES – The Rose Queen and her six princesses visited cancer patients at the USC/Norris Cancer Hospital on Tuesday to spread some holiday cheer. The seven-member Royal Court talked with hospital staff and patients who are undergoing chemotherapy and other treatments at the hospital. Queen Dusty Gibbs, who wants to be a physician’s assistant and work with pediatric cancer patients, said visiting area hospitals has been a rewarding experience. last_img read more