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One thing that can help stop the savings crisis in America

first_imgThe savings crisis is not waving the little white flag anytime soon. Americans face a barrage of financial obstacles in today’s economy: stagnant wages, low interest rates, and a painful absence of financial literacy. The situation is so dire many Americans believe they won’t ever be able to leave the workforce. They survive paycheck to paycheck. However, all hope is not lost. One simple maneuver is helping millions of working Americans save for their futures.In a perfect world, parents and the education system would teach personal finance to every boy and girl. Our children would grow up being taught good savings habits, applying those lessons throughout life to improve their financial situations. Unfortunately, reality is quite different. Many parents are afraid to talk about money, and while some schools are now teaching personal finance, bureaucracy hinders a more national impact. As a result, we’re left with a country filled of financial illiterates — where nearly half of Americans save virtually nothing.What’s the solution? Make saving money the default decision. When faced with a choice on a seemingly complex subject such as money, many individuals often take the default or “no decision” choice. In the case of voluntary savings plans, which requires participants to take action in order to save money, the “no decision” choice is a decision not to save. 401(k) plans are the most popular example. One quarter of employees don’t even save enough to receive the employer match, missing out on $24 billion of practically free money every year. continue reading » 27SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

USC’s schedule pays off for now

first_imgNo matter how hard Pete Carroll tries to turn the focus forward to the upcoming game against Washington, Saturday’s classic against Ohio State might be the only thing USC fans talk about for some time.The tilt between top-10 teams was a rarity on a number of levels.Earlier in the fall, Carroll mused on how few last-minute thrillers he had been involved in as a college coach. Redshirt sophomore linebacker Chris Galippo noted in the locker room after the game that it may have been the first instance of a close win that USC has experienced since he joined the team.But to the rest of the college football world, the primetime matchup was a ballad of a dying breed of intersectional regular-season games between top teams.There’s a simple reason why ESPN and ABC hyped the last two matchups between the Trojans and Buckeyes so heavily — top-tier non-conference games are an endangered species.Take a look at the non-conference schedules of the other top-five teams. Charleston Southern, Florida International and Louisiana-Monroe don’t exactly constitute a murderers’ row of opponents for powerhouse teams.With strength of schedule no longer a component of the Bowl Championship Series, most teams would prefer to pay a small directional school a hefty payday in exchange for an easy win. And with the rise of giant-killers like Boise State, Utah and BYU, few teams want to even take a risk in jeopardizing their postseason hopes by scheduling a solid opponent.San Jose State hardly made for a high-powered opener, but the Trojans still deserve credit for their courage in scheduling since Carroll’s arrival. USC is one of the few schools that has never played against a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as Division-IAA) school. Moreover, the team has given its fans chances to see some of college football’s best and brightest, including then-powerhouses Kansas State, Auburn and Virginia Tech.And that annual date with Notre Dame has made for some fun games, too.“These difficult road games early in the year help make us,” Carroll said after Saturday’s win. “You build from there if you learn the lessons.”It’s easy to say that the high reward of scheduling tough out-of-conference opponents outweighs the high risk after USC came away with yet another critical road win. But if the Trojans’ final drive had stalled, most fans probably would be bemoaning the strategy and wishing that Cal Poly had come to town for a guaranteed win before conference play.And it’s not certain that the Trojans will parlay their success against Ohio State into wins in conference. The celebrations following last year’s romp against the Buckeyes were brought to a halt when Oregon State upended the Trojans the following Thursday.But Carroll’s condition of “if you can learn the lessons” is the key to the rest of the season and whether anything will grow from the team’s experience in the Midwest. The Trojans were outplayed for long stretches of the game and have plenty to take away from the game in ways to improve.How they respond to the flaws they showed Saturday will ultimately determine how far the Trojans can go during the rest of the season. The 2004 team took more than just a win away from its contest with Virginia Tech and only experienced a couple more close calls on their way to the national championship.But no matter how far USC goes from this point forward, fans should be grateful to the school and team for giving them arguably the most entertaining game of the last three and a half years.“This is the most intense college football game I’ve ever been a part of,” Galippo said.USC doesn’t look like it will be changing its scheduling philosophy anytime soon. Tennessee Athletic Director Mike Hamilton announced last week that his school had reached a verbal agreement with USC for a home-and-home in 2021 and 2022.To give you an idea of how far off that is, both Carroll and current Tennessee head coach Lane Kiffin could be long gone by the time that series comes to fruition — if it ever does. There’s no guarantee that both programs will still be competitive come kickoff. I will be 34 when the second game is played and the future USC student who will hold my current position at the Daily Trojan is probably only eight years old right now.But I’m sure we’ll both be watching the game.“Tackling Dummy” runs Tuesdays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or email Michael at middlehu@usc.edu.last_img read more

Thomas F. Bliss, 86, Winfield: Feb. 9, 1927 – June 19, 2013

first_imgPreceding him in death are his parents, sister Bertha Ostrandar of Washington and brother Delbert Bliss of Kansas. Survivors include his wife Patricia of the home, daughters Carol Dick and husband Ed Dobson of Wellington and Cathy Bliss and husband Alan of Newkirk, OK, 4 grandchildren, and 7 great grandchildren, brother Albert G. Bliss of Canton, TX. Thomas F. Bliss, 86, of Winfield, died on Friday, July 19, 2013 at the Riverview Manor in Oxford.It was Tommie’s wish that following cremation no services will be held. It was Tommie’s wish that everyone do a good deed in memory of him.Thomas Fredrick Bliss was born on February 9, 1927 the son of Elmer E. and Florence E. (Crane) Bliss in Ashton. Tommie grew up on a farm in rural Sumner County until December 1947. He attended college at Southwestern for a semester before graduating from Wichita Business College.He was united in marriage with Patricia Walker on June 17, 1948 in Oxford. The family purchased the grain elevator in Oxford and Tommy worked there, until his retirement in 1985. The family continued to live in Oxford until 1995 and moved to Winfield. Tommy was a member of the Methodist Church and enjoyed travel, water sports and dancing.last_img read more

World Juniors 2020: Calgary Flames, USA Hockey netminder Dustin Wolf making a name for himself

first_imgCALGARY — When the puck drops in the Czech Republic for the 2020 IIHF World Junior Championship tournament on Boxing Day, the Calgary Flames will have just one representative at the event. That lone player: 18-year-old Dustin Wolf. The American goaltender was one of the last selections at the 2019 NHL Entry Draft and is quietly becoming one of the Flames’ — and the NHL’s — top prospects.Originally from Tustin, Calif., an Orange County suburb on the outskirts of Los Angeles, Wolf starred in local leagues as a teen. He moved up the coast in 2017 to join the Western Hockey League’s Everett Silvertips as Carter Hart’s understudy. Wolf’s latest challenge is the upcoming World Junior tournament. One of three goaltenders headed to selection camp — along with Florida Panthers prospect Spencer Knight and Vegas Golden Knights prospect Isaiah Saville – Wolf is hoping to make an impression and help the team win when they travel to the Czech Republic over the holidays.“I want to go into camp and show how much I’ve improved since the Summer Showcase and try to make it a tough decision for who they start,” he said, agreeing that the incumbent Knight may have the lead for the American starting job. “He’s obviously a first-round pick for a reason. Awesome guy, great goaltender, but obviously you’re fighting for a job and you want to play as many games as you can. Whatever it takes to [win] a gold medal, that’s what it’s going to be.”Needless to say, Flames brass is excited to see what Wolf can do on the international stage. For the first time since Johnny Gaudreau captured gold in 2013, the C of Red may be spending the holiday season cheering for the red, white and blue. WJC 2020: Analyzing Canada’s roster | Alexis LafreniereNow in his third season in the WHL and second as Everett’s starter, Wolf has emerged as one of the WHL’s top performers. Heading into the holiday break, he is among the leaders in wins (17), shutouts (five), save percentage (.941) and goals-against average (1.91) in all of Canadian junior hockey. With the pressure of his draft year off, the backstop is allowing himself to focus on hockey.“Just being able to go and play now, not having any worries about what people think of you, [you’re] just going out there and playing your game,” Wolf told Sporting News following a recent victory over the Calgary Hitmen. “When you come out with a win there’s a plus to it. We’ve got a great team right now and hopefully, continue that moving forward.”🎥 WHL Highlight of the Night 🎥November 2, 2019 @NHLFlames prospect @dwolf2332 of @WHLsilvertips#WHLHoN pic.twitter.com/f5rpttPz4F— The WHL (@TheWHL) November 3, 2019Just six months ago, Wolf was one of the sentimental stories of the draft.Highly touted due to his numbers and Everett’s strong season, he unexpectedly slid to the seventh round — 214th overall and fourth from the very end of the entire draft — and was still in attendance at Rogers Arena in Vancouver for the pick. Tears flowed and a big grin was there too as he was selected by the Flames, an organization whose captain is the undrafted Mark Giordano and most iconic players include late draft selections like Theoren Fleury who taken in a round that no longer exists.“Obviously I didn’t expect to stay until the last four picks in the draft,” said Wolf. “But I couldn’t have asked for anything better than to come to Calgary. I’ve got nothing but good things to say about them and they’ve supported me through everything thus far.”It’s pretty much been a dream come true and still a lot of work to do, but a step in the right direction.”The 2010s: Crosby named NHL Athlete of the Decade | NHL All-Decade Teamlast_img read more