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Onboarding during COVID: New hires grapple with office politics from home

first_imgOne young trader hired by a major European bank as the British lockdown began said remote working had made corporate culture even tougher to navigate.”It’s not exactly easy for your new boss to explain the specifics of office politics to you without putting their foot in it,” she said, declining to be named due to company policy.”It does feel like it’s taking longer to feel loyalty to my new employer than it might have otherwise. I feel loyal to the team but not to the wider bank.”A new joiner at a different, London-based bank said his interviewers had appeared to study his bookshelves and photos while asking questions, and that he does not expect to meet his colleagues in person until next year, although he joined in May. For Sam Thompson, who joined money saving and investment app MoneyBox, a lack of face-to-face contact did make some early interactions with colleagues feel more transactional. But he appreciated the lengths the company has gone to to make it work.”We’ve been getting Deliveroo vouchers and we’ve been sitting around our computers while talking to one another and having lunch,” he said. “It’s probably the best induction into a company that I’ve ever had,” said the Quality Assurance Engineer, who has had several jobs in six years in the industry.Founded in 2016, MoneyBox has taken on 35 new hires during the lockdown to a total headcount of 135. It initially held off from filling roles requiring interaction with multiple teams, such as developers, Jack Johnstone, head of HR and talent, said, but overcame those fears.Its approach mirrors those of major banks including Standard Chartered, Citi and Deutsche Bank, which have all rapidly redesigned their interview and orientation process.Citi hired around 3,840 new staff in its Institutional Clients Group Operations & Technology between March and August.Once a new hire is appointed, MoneyBox and the banks send out a joining manual or welcoming video along with the required technology.Virtual face-to-face meetings are held much more regularly with managers, buddy partners are formed with existing staff and an array of tech platforms are used to maintain communication.Meetings with different teams and online social events are encouraged to help staff build broader networks and replicate the ‘chance meetings’ they may have had in canteens and lifts.Drinks anyone?Andy Halford, chief financial officer of Standard Chartered, told Reuters online drinks and other social events were vital.”Some people find it easier to talk and connect when they are not ‘at work’,” he said. “We want to humanize this situation for everyone.”Professor Nicholas Bloom at Stanford University said new hires unable to meet colleagues in person would struggle with unspoken rules – from how many hours people really work to when to take a break and what to wear.For graduates, who often work long hours when joining banks or big law firms, that poses another risk. “At home it generates a strong incentive for over-communication, so endlessly sending unnecessary emails and slack messages just to highlight the fact that you’re still there,” Bloom said.Still, McKinsey Partner Alexander DiLeonardo said new hires have to work harder to network. “When you aren’t sitting next to your new colleagues or outside your supervisor’s office, you have to be intentional about reaching out,” he said. Topics :center_img Joining a new company can be tough at the best of times, with bosses to impress, skills to learn and new colleagues to befriend.But that task becomes a whole lot harder when the “onboarding” is done during a pandemic that has forced millions to work from home, leaving new hires to judge colleagues on their taste in curtains and conduct on Zoom.The companies that get it right should have an expanded, grateful workforce, but get it wrong and new hires could find it hard to develop team spirit or a sense of belonging to the firm.last_img read more

Irish provinces on the road in Pro12

first_imgA win for Pat Lam’s side would see them take over the top-spot in the table ahead of Ulster’s game tomorrow.Kick-off is at half-past four. Leinster are in Wales to face the Cardiff Blues at the Arms Park in a 3 o’clock kick-off.The province have restored a host of Irish internationals to their starting side for the game with the likes of Eoin Reddan, Ian Madigan and Fergus McFadden all coming back into the team after international duty.Also this afternoon, Connacht will be looking to continue their impressive run of form as they travel to Italy to take-on Zebre.last_img read more

Top 10 players with most career goals: Messi, Ronaldo, Rooney and Suarez feature

first_img 10 10 10 10 10 10 6. David Villa has scored 376 career goals (in 745 games) – The Spaniard scored 286 goals in his Spanish club career, which took in Barcelona, Valencia and Atletico Madrid. He swapped Spain for the States in June 2014, and has 29 for New York City, so far. Villa briefly joined Melbourne City, getting his name on the scoresheet twice. And he netted 59 for Spain in a trophy-laden nine years, during which he won 97 caps. 7. Luis Suarez has scored 349 career goals (in 539 games) – The Uruguay international has 84 goals for current club Barcelona, plus 82 for Liverpool, 111 for Ajax, 15 for Gronigen, 12 for Nacional and 45 for his country. He has won the European Golden Shoe award with both Liverpool and Barca. Suarez has top scored in the Dutch, English and Spanish top flights. 3. Zlatan Ibrahimovic has scored 453 career goals (in 792 games) – The Sweden icon has rarely struggled to find the back of the net, scoring for Ajax, Juventus, Inter, Barcelona, AC Milan and Paris Saint-Germain, winning titles in four countries. Ibrahimovic has also scored 62 goals for his country’s senior team. 10 10 Lionel Messi has retired from international football after losing his fourth major final with his national team, but he does so as Argentina’s record goal scorer.Meanwhile, Cristiano Ronaldo is attempting to fire Portugal to Euro 2016 glory, a month after helping Real Madrid claim an 11th Champions League triumph.But the European Golden Shoe for most league goals in the 2015/16 season went to Luis Suarez, who bagged 40 Liga goals for Barcelona.So, who has the most career goals to date? Take a look at the slideshow countdown above to find out.*From a selection of current professional footballers playing in (or who have played the majority of their career in) elite level professional football.All statistics correct up to and including 26 June 2016 5. Robbie Keane has scored 377 career goals (in 846 games) – Keane has scored 310 times for Coventry City, Inter, Leeds United, Tottenham Hotspur, Liverpool, West Ham, Aston Villa, Celtic and LA Galaxy, plus a record 67 goals for Republic of Ireland. 10 9. Wayne Rooney has scored 314 career goals (in 711 games) – Rooney, who is second to Bobby Charlton on Manchester United’s all-time goalscorers list, has scored 245 goals for Man United and a record 52 for England. 2. Lionel Messi has scored 519 career goals (in 683 games) – As well as being Barcelona’s all-time record goal scorer, Messi is also Argentina’s most prolific international, having netted 55 goals for his national side. Add 11 goals for Barca’s second and third teams in the Spanish third and fourth divisions and you have over 519 career goals. Messi has won three European Golden Shoe awards. 8. Didier Drogba has scored 346 career goals (in 750 games) – The Stamford Bridge legend has scored 71 goals in French football, for Le Mans, Guingamp and Marseille, got 20 for Turkish club Galatasaray and eight for Chinese side Shanghai. Drogba has scored 18 in Montreal Impact colours, 65 for Ivory Coast, and not forgetting his 164 for Chelsea. 4. Samuel Eto’o has scored 384 career goals (in 788 games) – The well-travelled Eto’o is widely remembered for his goals for Mallorca, Barcelona and Inter, while his goal tally at Chelsea, Anzhi, Everton, Sampdoria and current club Antalyaspor have bumped up his career total. For Cameroon he scored 56 international goals. 10. Francesco Totti has scored 313 career goals (in 814 games) – to find out who are the world’s top goal scorers in competitive football, click the arrow above – The Italian is a true one-club man, having made his debut for Roma at the age of 16 in 1993. Incredibly he is still playing at the age of 39 and has no intention of calling it a day just yet. As well as 304 goals for Roma, he bagged nine for Italy, including one in the Azzuri’s glorious 2006 World Cup campaign. 10 1. Cristiano Ronaldo has scored 547 career goals (in 787 games) – Ronaldo’s record for Los Blancos is simply stunning and he is showing few signs of letting up in front of goal. Along with his record 364 for Real, he has 118 goals for Manchester United, five for his first club Sporting, and a national record 60 for Portugal. Ronaldo has claimed four European Golden Shoe awards.last_img read more