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Leahy Center for Rural Students established at Lyndon State College

first_imgSource: Lyndon State. 5.18.2010 When Lyndon State College was accepted as one of five New England schools to participate in the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s Project Compass initiative three years ago, the focus was on increasing the college retention and graduation rates of first-in-family, modest-income students (FFMI). In the midst of these efforts, project leaders discovered that there is very little information about the specific needs of and best practices in serving rural students—a surprising discovery, given that one fifth of the nation’s public school students are enrolled in rural school districts. The college also realized that there are many more students capable of pursuing a post-secondary education than those who do and that the College could best serve these students by coordinating with local PK-12 education providers to create a regional PK-16 network.Towards these ends, thanks to the efforts of Senator Patrick Leahy, Lyndon State College is pleased to announce the creation of the Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students. President Carol A. Moore announced the creation of the Leahy Center for Rural Students at the College’s 2010 commencement ceremony May 16.The central question to be answered by The Leahy Center for Rural Students is what are the expectations of FFMI students relating to their education and careers and when do those expectations solidify. Many potential FFMI students never see themselves as college graduates or perhaps assume they cannot afford a college education, even when they have the potential to thrive in the college setting. It is well known that a college degree increases the lifetime earning capabilities of an individual many fold, so it is important for these students to understand the options available to them and to support the students and their families as they navigate the unfamiliar territory of pursuing a college education. President Carol A Moore presents a certificate to Marcelle and Senator Patrick Leahy naming the Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students at Lyndon State College commencement Sunday, May 16, at the College.The Center for Rural Students began an in-depth longitudinal panel study this past fall under the direction of former Lyndon Prof. Rod Zwick, which will be carried on now by Center Director Heather Bouchey. The study will expand beyond the College to include students attending seven area schools that have been identified as the pilot schools in the creation of a regional PK-16 network. Ultimately, the findings of this study will inform how teachers, parents, schools administrators, business leaders and community members can work together in supporting students towards their full learning and career potential.The initial study will follow students individually and as a group from fifth grade through four years post-high school, to learn what influences a student’s decisions regarding higher education. “It is critical to understand where the college/no college decision is made,” said Zwick. “We need to help students make that decision in an informed way and encourage them to make their own individual education aspirations fit with their own future plans.”While not all careers require a four-year degree, most now need some sort of continuing education or training. While much is known about how urban students make these choices, little is known about rural, FFMI students. The Center for Rural Students will play an important role in changing that reality.On Friday June 18, The Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students will be hosting a Vermont Education Summit at Lyndon State College for educators and community leaders from across the state to discuss how we can work together at the local and state level to help every Vermont student achieve their full potential along the PK-16 spectrum. This conference is being sponsored by AT&T. For more information, contact Heather Bouchey at 802-626-6444 or heather.bouchey@lyndonstate.edu(link sends e-mail).last_img read more

Rio Indoor Streetball Championship

first_imgThe stars will be out in tonight’s quarter-finalsTHE battle lines have been drawn as the fate of several teams will be decided this evening, when the quarter-final round in the inaugural Rio Indoor Streetball Championship is played at the National Gymnasium, Mandela Avenue.The four matches programmed for the evening are expected to thrill the large gathering that is expected to descend on the venue to witness the thrilling action.Tournament hosts and dark-horse Rio All-Stars will open the night’s proceedings against Future Stars from 20:00hrs. Rio All-Stars possess quality players in the form of Andrew Murray, Jermin Junior, Job Caesar and Kelsey Benjamin and will fancy their chances of progressing to the semi-final round.However, standing in their way will be the quartet of Kevin Cummings, Keron Solomon, Jamal Cozier and Rondell Bowman. A major rivalry will be revisited in the second match from 21:00hrs, when Gold is Money take aim at Leopold Street.Gold is Money will depend on the likes of Randolph Wagner, Jamal Pedro, Keifer Brandt and Phillip Rowley to shift the balance in their favour while Darren Benjamin, Carl Tudor, Mark Jhalu and Okeene Fraser will be tasked with ensuring a Leopold win.In the third match, National heavyweight Sparta Boss will oppose the pride of the East Coast of Demerara BV from 22:00hrs. The East La Penitence unit are considered one of the favourites in the event and will be expected to overturn the challenge of their impending opponents, led by their star- studded cast of Gregory Richardson, Sheldon Shepherd, Eusi Phillips and Ryan Hackett.Meanwhile, the final match of the evening can be described as a virtual final when Bent Street lock horns with Back Circle from 23:00hrs.For many pundits, Bent Street are viewed as the safe choice for a final-appearance duel, with their plethora of national team players, Daniel Wilson, Clive Nobrega, Pernell Schultz, Akel Clarke and William Europe.However, Back Circle are giants in their own regard and with the fate of the entire East Ruimveldt community on their shoulders, a clinical showing will be expected from the quintet of Selwyn Williams, Stephon McLean, Jermin Beckles, Delon Kelly and surprise package Trayon Bobb.According to an official release from tournament coordinator Three Peat Promotions, “The excitement and anticipation in the air and within the respective communities cannot be described. The teams are well oiled and geared to produce thrilling action which will certainly entertain and provide drama for the large spectatorship.”last_img read more

Jurors proclaim suspected spy guilty

first_imgProsecutors alleged the systems were sensitive and labeled NOFORN, or barred from the view of foreign nationals. Defense attorneys argued that Mak had given presentations on the information on the disks at symposiums that were open to foreigners. Defense attorney Marilyn Bednarski, who called the government’s case against Mak “an alarmist overreaction,” argued that the government did not place restrictions on the information on the disks until several months after Mak’s arrest, so he could not have known about it. Staples said a person must first apply to the State Department for a license to send out the information, and Mak never did, despite his intensive training in how to handle classified and sensitive information. Staples told jurors that in 1989, the State Department barred the export of any military technology to China, and that “barely nothing on these disks could be sent to China.” After the verdicts, Staples said that Mak never sought permission for the presentations. SANTA ANA – A naturalized U.S. citizen from China was convicted Thursday of sending sensitive information on submarine technology that he worked on at a defense contractor job in Orange County. Chi Mak, 66, of Downey was found guilty of five counts of conspiracy to violate export control laws and other charges. He also was convicted of two counts of attempting to send sensitive material to China, acting as a foreign agent without notifying the U.S. government and making false statements to federal agents. Mak faces up to 35 years in prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Greg Staples. Under sentencing guidelines, that amount would probably be less, but it will still be “a substantial” prison term, he said. The eight-woman, four-man panel deliberated less than three days. Mak, an electrical engineer at Power Paragon in Anaheim, was accused of conspiring with his relatives to send an encrypted computer disk to China in October 2005 that contained information on the Quiet Electric Drive power system designed to make submarines quieter, as well as a solid state power switch for ships. Mak and his wife, Rebecca Chiu, were arrested in their Downey home shortly after his brother, Tai Mak, and his wife, Fuk Li, were arrested on Oct. 28, 2005, at Los Angeles International Airport, as they prepared to board a plane. Prosecutors allege that Tai Mak had an encrypted disk so that the information within would not be found. Mak told agents who later questioned him that he had given documents relating to research for the U.S. Navy to his brother so that Tai Mak could select engineering books for Chi Mak while his brother was in Hong Kong, according to the indictment. Tai Mak’s son, Billy Yui Mak, who is accused of encrypting the material, was arrested later. The other family members are scheduled to go to trial on June 5. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more