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Highgate Hill inner-city jungle hideaway

first_imgLook out on the surrounding gully from the moment you wake up.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoMs Burkett said the house consisted of three different pavilions across two levels.“It has a lot of glass in addition to there being outdoor spaces, so when you’re inside you still have that connection to the outside,” Ms Burkett said. The house uses timber and glass to maintain a connection with the outdoors.When asked if she had undertaken any renovation of the property, Ms Burkett said they completed a project annually but always with the integrity of the original design at the front of their minds.“We’ve been very passionate about conserving and maintaining it,” she said.“Every year we’ve taken on a project but always respecting the design, because in our view, that’s the true value of the house.” This is the perfect place to get some inspiration for your latest project.Ms Burkett said the library was her favourite area in the home.“My favourite is the library area.“One of its walls slides open and you can look down the gully toward the river and at night, you can see the lights shining on the river.” The house at 1 Derby St, Highgate Hill, is for sale.NESTLED in a lush slice of inner-city land, this architectural wonder is the ultimate hideaway.The house at 1 Derby St, Highgate Hill, was commissioned by its original owners and designed by architects Andresen and O’Gorman.center_img Is there anything more relaxing than curling up by the fire with a book?Greta Burkett bought the house a decade ago and the privacy of the property was a major drawcard.“It’s very close to the city but when you walk into the property, you feel as though you could be miles away,” Ms Burkett said. The bathrooms follow the theme.She said she will fondly remember time spent with family and friends at the house, as well as becoming a part of the close-knit community, who were keen to conserve the nature around them.“All of the neighbours have been wonderful, we’ve formed really lovely friendships with all of them.“They’re all passionate about the gully as well.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:51Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:51 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenStarting your hunt for a dream home00:51last_img read more

James H. Jasper

first_imgJames Harmon Jasper, 81, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Sunday February 24, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio.He was born September 9, 1937 in Somerset, KY, son of the late Edward Jasper and Ada (Cook) Jasper. James served with the Kentucky National Guard.James worked as head of maintenance with Cooks Screen with over 42 years of service.He enjoyed yard work, gardening, camping and horse shoes. James loved to hunt and fish, but his favorite thing was playing with his grandkids.James is survived by his loving spouse of 60 years, Imogene Jasper (Adams), daughters, Brenda (Mack) Johnson of Aurora, IN, Charlotte (Ron) Gascon of Milan, IN, Diana (Tony) Womack of Moores Hill, IN, Bonnie (Mark) Pennington of Moores Hill, IN; three siblings, Ron (Brenda) Jasper of Attica, IN, Don (Peggy) Jasper of Attica, IN, Barbara Shelley of Waynesburg, KY.; 12 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; 1 great, great-grandchild; .He was preceded in death by his parents Edward and Ada; siblings, George, Roy, Paul & Jessie Jasper, and Dorothy McKinnley.Friends will be received Thursday, February 28, 2019, 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, 219 Mechanic Street, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the Funeral Home, at 2:00 pm.Interment will follow in the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the Hogan Township Fire Department. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Area Baseball Sectional Scores (5-22)

first_imgArea Baseball Sectional ScoresWednesday  (5-22)Class 1A-Sectional 60 @ Jac-Cen-Del.Oldenburg  8     Jac-Cen-Del  2Hauser  7     North Decatur  5Class 2A-Sectional 45 @ South Ripley.Austin  8     Switzerland County  2Class 3A-Sectional 29 @ South Dearborn.Greensburg  8     Lawrenceburg  5Class 4A-Sectional 14 @ East Central.Bloomington South  1     Bloomington North 0Columbus East  1     Shelbyville  0last_img

Whicker: Brandon Morrow brings the heat, humility for the Dodgers

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The No. 7 pick in the 2006 MLB draft got the first 21 outs Thursday night. The No. 5 pick came in, got the next two.The No 7 pick has three Cy Young Awards and an MVP and never has suffered a serious arm problem.The No. 5 pick is on his fourth major league franchise and is playing his third role. He also has been betrayed by multiple body parts, like most of those who defy God’s intentions and try to throw baseballs as hard as they can.Brandon Morrow, the No 5, is far more typical than Clayton Kershaw, the No. 7. He is also pitching his way toward a major speaking part in this 2017 Dodger story.He has retired 35 batters, given up four hits, walked one and hit one, and he has struck out 14. No earned runs or any other kind, going into Saturday.Morrow and Pedro Baez are the lead-ins for Kenley Jansen, the closer. He came to camp hat-in-hand, knowing that the Dodgers have the largest welcome mat in baseball.“I could have opted out at a certain date,” Morrow said. “The vibe was good, everybody was welcoming. This team has a chance to get to the playoffs. I haven’t been there yet. It’s kind of a big goal for me.”Nor has Morrow thrown 200 innings in a season, and he is three career wins short of 50, at age 32.center_img “I think I’ve always known I’d be OK after each thing I’ve gone through,” he said, “even though I’ve had every piece of my arm hurt.”When given a chance, he has done extraordinary things.In his first-ever major start, for Seattle, he took a no-hitter two outs deep into the eighth inning against the Yankees. No one had done that since Boston’s Billy Rohr in 1967, 41 years prior.In 2010 with Toronto, Morrow pitched three shutouts, held left-hand batters to a .188 average and, on Aug. 8, became the fourth pitcher since 1954 to strike out 17 in a complete game one-hitter. Tampa Bay’s Evan Longoria singled, two out in the ninth.““People were going crazy but I felt a weird emotion at the end,” Morrow said. “I was just gassed. I’d thrown 137 pitches. It was the best game of my life. Then somebody hit me with a Gatorade cooler and nearly knocked me to the ground.”Morrow struck out 12 Yankees in his next start.The next year he led the American League with 10.2 strikeouts per nine innings.“Elite stuff,” said Alex Anthopoulos, a Dodgers’ assistant general manager who was Toronto’s GM when Morrow was there. “Every time he had a setback, he managed to get back to that.”But in 2009 there was bicep tendinitis. In 2012 there was an oblique strain. In 2013 Morrow suffered an entrapped radial nerve in his forearm.In 2014 there was a torn tendon sheath in a finger. In 2015 came the big one, a right shoulder impingement that required surgery, while he was with San Diego..Although Morrow says he doesn’t always have a “cheery disposition” when the bumps arrive, he got through it with a certain detachment. And, occasionally, amusement. He said the finger rehab was the strangest.“I was stuck in really boring rehab for four months,” he said, “sitting there with a surgeon and a veterinarian. One of the things we did was manipulating a clothespin.“Then right in the middle of rehab from the shoulder, I got valley fever, this fungal pneumonia. I’d lost 10 pounds from the surgery, and now 15 more. Last year was devoted to rehabbing and building myself up. When I got to the Dodgers I was feeling pretty good.”Beyond that, Morrow was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 18 and has worn an insulin pump.At the moment he is another example of the Dodgers’ 30-team radar, their sense of when to rescue someone’s career. The Angels are doing much the same thing with 6-foot-9 Alex Meyer, once Minnesota’s top minor league pitcher. Meyer is getting his moving parts together. He gave up one hit in six innings against the Dodgers, although he struggled with control. He could become a rotation fixture, a blue-light special in a game where development is complicated.“Teams draft players and put so much into them, want them to succeed so much,” Anthopoulos said. “Sometimes the pressure builds up. The player goes somewhere else and there’s a clean slate, the expectations are lower.”Gratitude replaces ambition. Morrow seems to savor every loud fastball pop into the mitts of his catchers. “I just like pitching, man,” he said, unnecessarily.last_img read more