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SBU Prof. Named First Andrew Carnegie Fellow from a Long Island College

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Stony Brook University professor was the first educator from a college on Long Island to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow when he won the prestigious fellowship this week.Jared Farmer, an environmental historian and award-winning adjunct professor of history, plans to use the $200,000 award to complete a creative non-fiction book on the human relationship with long-lived trees and our larger relationship with nature in a time of climate change.“I am bringing together the history of trees and the science of longevity to contemplate the ethics and politics of long-term thinking in the Anthropocene,” said Farmer. “I’m a historian by training, but this new project includes aspects of science writing as well as creative writing.”Farmer is one of 35 fellows recognized by the program, which aims to support emerging humanities scholars that are working to strengthen the US democracy, drive creativity, explore global connections and improve environments. The program launched in 2015 and each fellow publishes a book or major study.The professor, who earned his PhD in history from Stanford University, previously authored three books, including the award-winning On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape. He began teaching at Stony Brook a decade ago.“Climate change is not only the policy problem of our time; it is also a problem of time,” Farmer said. “It requires thinking and caring in the long term—beyond the moment, the individual, and the species. I think it’s important to find historical precedents for long-term stewardship of the more-than-human world. To the extent possible in 2017, I want to write a hopeful book—one that shows the shared solicitudes of science, religion, and the humanities.”last_img read more

Andy Murray wins Paris Masters to celebrate world number one status

first_imgAndy Murray topped off a week that saw him named as the world number one for the first time with victory over John Isner in the final of the Paris Masters, winning 6-3 6-7 6-4.The Briton, who will take over from Novak Djokovic at the top of the ATP rankings on Monday, survived a barrage of aces against the towering American to win his 14th career Masters tournament.The three-times grand slam champion gave little breathing space to Isner, who was hoping to clinch his first Masters title after two lost finals.Murray will be the top seed at the season-ending ATP World Tour finals at the O2 Arena in London from Nov. 13-20.”Thanks to my team and my family who were commenting back home. This has been an incredible journey for me to get to the top of the rankings, I could have not done it without all of you,” said Murray.The double Olympic champion entered the contest with a 7-0 record against Isner and his recent form, which had helped him to win six of his eight previous tournaments since losing the French Open final, suggested he would have the upper hand. Murray, who now has 43 titles to his name, broke in the sixth game on his first opportunity when Isner sent a backhand long.Andy Murray wins Paris Masters to celebrate world number one statusEurosport UK1 hour agoAndy Murray topped off a week that saw him named as the world number one for the first time with victory over John Isner in the final of the Paris Masters, winning 6-3 6-7 6-4.The Briton, who will take over from Novak Djokovic at the top of the ATP rankings on Monday, survived a barrage of aces against the towering American to win his 14th career Masters tournament. The three-times grand slam champion gave little breathing space to Isner, who was hoping to clinch his first Masters title after two lost finals.Murray will be the top seed at the season-ending ATP World Tour finals at the O2 Arena in London from Nov. 13-20.”Thanks to my team and my family who were commenting back home. This has been an incredible journey for me to get to the top of the rankings, I could have not done it without all of you,” said Murray.The double Olympic champion entered the contest with a 7-0 record against Isner and his recent form, which had helped him to win six of his eight previous tournaments since losing the French Open final, suggested he would have the upper hand.Murray, who now has 43 titles to his name, broke in the sixth game on his first opportunity when Isner sent a backhand long. The American, who served a total of 18 aces, had two chances to break back in the following game as he opened up a 40-15 lead.Murray saved the first with a routine volley after managing to lob his 2.08-metre opponent, and forced Isner to bury a backhand into the net on the second.He bagged the opening set with an unreturned serve having made only four unforced errors.Isner earned three break points thanks to a splendid drop shot followed by a forehand winner. Murray saved them all, the last one with a second-serve ace, and staved off another one to stay level.In the tiebreak, Isner went 4-2 up when Murray double faulted, and the American closed it out with a booming forehand winner to send the contest into a decider.last_img read more