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Brazilian Officer Returns To Brazil With Unprecedented UN Award

first_imgBy Taciana Moury / Diálogo August 21, 2019 In early July 2019, the officer was assigned to the Almirante Sylvio de Camargo Training Center, in Rio de Janeiro, and will be working at the Naval Peacekeeping Operations School, which trains MB service members for UN peacekeeping operations or MB international commitments.UN Secretary-General António Guterres presented Lt. Cmdr. Márcia with the award on March 29, 2019, for serving as military gender advisor in the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA, in French). The officer visited the Central African Republic (CAR) from April 2018 to April 2019.In an interview with Diálogo, Lt. Cmdr. Márcia attributed the award to her dedication to the work carried out in MINUSCA. “It was a personal battle. I had never dedicated myself to anything as much as I did to protecting the civilians,” she said. “There was no better way to close the cycle of my mission in CAR. It’s very good to be recognized, and to have it done on an international level is beyond my wildest dreams.” The activities were carried out closer to the local community and projects were developed to mitigate threats. “I believe that whenever service members are on the ground, we can avoid abuses. The patrol, preferably comprised of men and women, the engagement, and listening to the community are fundamental for the protection of civilians.”The small number of women working on MINUSCA was among the main challenges Lt. Cmdr. Márcia faced. “I had 3.7 percent women. The average for missions was 4 percent, including military observers, team, and troop workers. [It’s a] very small amount, when considering the importance of mixed patrols to get closer to women, especially those who have been victims of sexual violence,” she said. “Language was another obstacle to approaching the community. There were battalions that did not speak French, which is predominant in the region.”Despite the challenges, Lt. Cmdr. Márcia said the experience in a UN mission is unforgettable. “At each obstacle, I increased my strength to continue working toward helping people. I was the happiest I had ever been. I miss Africa. It’s part of me now, part of my history,” she concluded. United Nations Peacekeeping Ministerial: Uniformed Capabilities, Performance and Protection A main part of the work Lt. Cmdr. Márcia developed was to assess and understand the region’s more sensitive areas and the  locations of groups. The goal was to document characteristics of the terrain to be able to advise military commanders on the best troop positioning.“The gender advisor must be on the ground, with the locals and the contingent, not working from an office,” she said. “If I know about armed groups recruiting children in an area, I need to pay more attention to the kids’ routine, to understand how abuses occur and alert the troops to the need for intervention.” Lt. Cmdr. Márcia encouraged interaction with children during the mission. (Photo: United Nations)The officer also received the Victory Medal from the Brazilian Ministry of Defense, on April 5, 2019, which President Jair Bolsonaro presented. “This shows that, like the UN, Brazil recognizes the importance of gender equality and the protection of civilians,” she said.The goal of her mission was to apply gender perspectives within the military component, to avoid human rights violations. Until then, no such work had been performed in MINUSCA. “I created an action plan from scratch, from staffing to the engagement of locals.”According to Lt. Cmdr. Márcia, five steps were defined in the line of action: development of the workforce; service member training, which included visiting sectors and battalions to explain the importance of using the gender perspective on a day-to-day basis; information exchanges; inclusion of gender perspective in documents and guidelines produced in the mission; and engagement and deployment within communities. “It was a full cycle. It was gratifying to see the mixed teams of men and women working to protect the local population,” she said.last_img read more

Men’s Hockey: Sitting down with star freshman Alex Turcotte

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s ice hockey team (7-10-1, 2-7-1-1 Big Ten) is having a rough go at the dish lately, losing in several underwhelming performances. Despite having a record under .500, they remain one of the nation’s top and most exciting programs. Part of this success? Wisconsin’s highly-recruited freshman center, Alex Turcotte.Turcotte was drafted with the fifth overall pick in the 2019 National Hockey League Entry Draft by the Los Angeles Kings and stands as the third-highest selected Badger in the NHL Draft in school history.Men’s Hockey: Badgers NHL draftees set to take off in freshman seasonFollowing an NHL Draft that featured four Badgers, the University of Wisconsin squad is loaded with young talent. Alex Turcotte, Read…The 5-foot-11, left-handed, 180-pound centerman from Island Lake, Illinois, has had a terrific freshman season through 14 games, scoring over a point-per-game on average. He is a top contributer for the Badgers in points (15), goals (6), assists (9) and powerplay goals (4).He was one of four Badgers to be drafted in the 2019 NHL Draft, others being freshmen Cole Caufield, Owen Lindmark and Ryder Donovan. These four have all played together on different U.S. National teams prior to this season. Turcotte described how going to school, practicing and playing with these three has created a tight bond between them.“That’s where we became best friends,” Turcotte said. “Having that encouragement has been great and it’s like another support piece. You get to lean on guys like that because you’re going through the same thing as them, so it’s been great.”While his friends and teammates have been extremely supportive of him, nothing has served as more of a support piece to Turcotte than his dad, Alfie Turcotte, who was drafted 17th overall in the 1983 NHL Entry Draft by the Montreal Canadiens.Alex discussed his feeling on being drafted twelve spots higher than Alfie.“He’d always kind of chirp me about it,” Alex said. “It was all fun and games, so I kind of jab him back a little bit now.”Even with some playful jabs, the relationship between the two is purely loving.Turcotte was enthusiastic about the amount of support his father has given him, as it has helped him become the player and man he is today.“I’m here and I am who I am today because of him,” Turcotte said of his father. “He’s definitely been the biggest influence in my life on and off the ice, so he’s been a great supporting piece.”Alex has had a tremendous impact on the Badgers’ offensive success this season, but it is not just him carrying the load. Wisconsin’s freshmen as a whole have been the glue of the team and have had an enormous impact on the season thus far.Turcotte pointed out how, despite the team’s youth, most of the players are used to playing against older competition.“A lot of us [freshmen] played juniors, so we played against older guys when we were younger than them, so we kind of have some of that experience,” Turcotte said. “It’s still a big adjustment. Even from the USA team to here … we can always improve and definitely have a lot of things to work on.”Another adjustment for Turcotte has been playing in front of a larger crowd at the Kohl Center as opposed to playing in front of the crowd at the U.S. National team games. Yet, this has been a relatively smooth transition for him despite the daunting nature of the task.Men’s hockey: Wisconsin’s overloaded 2019-20 freshmen class is its best in yearsThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team recently landed a surplus of talent in their 2019 freshman class. The incoming Read…Though Turcotte has had a great experience playing for the Badgers this season, his decision to play came as a result of choosing not to play for the Kings. This was a huge decision for someone who has been surrounded by hockey his entire life.His reasoning, however, was not related to avoiding his inevitable leap to play professional hockey, but rather because of his relationships with current Badger teammates. “Just the guys that are here, a lot are really great teammates, and going with Cole and Owen — it was an easy decision,” Turcotte said. Even with this decision, Turcotte is aware that his NHL jump is looming, and he acknowledged that getting stronger and more prepared for the NHL is a major factor on his mind. Moving forward, improvements can come in numerous ways for Turcotte. This means improving his goal scoring, shooting and 200-foot game in order to bring these attributes to Los Angeles, where there already lies an elite 200-foot centerman and one of Turcotte’s favorite players, Anže Kopitar.“As far as goal scoring goes, just scoring from different areas on the ice, but using my shot more,” Turcotte said. “I’m more of a playmaker, so I think using my shot can be a dual threat. I know what I can do offensively, but I think you want to be out there in all situations, and in order to do that, you need to have a good 200-foot game.”To develop his 200-foot game, Turcotte strives to be more relied on defensively, and to improve his faceoff percentage.Men’s Hockey: Inconsistencies continue to plague Wisconsin against MinnesotaThe No. 19 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (6-7-1, 1-4-1-1 Big Ten) struggled immensely against the University of Minnesota Read…His ability to develop as a player has changed drastically over time, as he had to find ways to succeed against players who were much bigger, stronger and older. “When you’re a kid, it’s a lot more separated on talent and you can kind of get away with it if you are more talented, but then ever since the U.S. teams and college … there’s not that much of a difference from each player,” Turcotte said.The sudden even playing field has caused Turcotte to work much harder than he ever had before.Turcotte explained that playing in college has required an adjustment period, but he feels that the high level of competition is crucial to his career.“I think just working hard and trying to get better every day can really go a long way because there’s not much separation from guys,” Turcotte said. “Everyone’s a lot older and physically more mature, and, especially in college, there’s 25-year-olds. That’s crazy. I’m 18, so playing against guys that are way older, I can only help and see how much of a physical advantage they have, but you have to adapt, and it can only make you better.”Men’s Hockey: Crease Creatures craziest student section in hockeyThe No. 7 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (4-2-0, 0-0-0 Big Ten) has impressed in a major way through Read…Next time you’re at a Badger hockey game, watch out for No. 15 on the ice, as he may be an NHL star in the making.last_img read more

Bolt, Fraser-Pryce aiming at more success this year

first_img Pushing myself She added: “I am looking forward to an exciting 2016.” Shot-putter O’Dayne Richards, who twice hit a national record – 21.69m – on his way to winning Pan American gold and a historic World Championships bronze, was presented with the runner-up to the Sportsman of the Year Award. World Championships 100m hurdles gold-medal winner Danielle Williams who clocked a personal best 12.57 for gold in the event in Beijing last summer was runner-up to the Sportswoman of the Year. The People’s Choice Award for Performance of the Year went to Jamaica’s senior women’s 4x400m relay team. Novlene Williams-Mills, who anchored Jamaica to the gold medal in the World Championships 4x400m and who has successfully fought off breast cancer, was recognised with the Chairman’s Award. Former Netball Jamaica president Marva Bernard was honoured with the Lifetime Achievement Award. Newly crowned RJR Sports Foundation National Sportsman and Sportswoman of 2015, Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, say winning the prestigious title means a lot to them, adding they will be looking to represent Jamaica well, and seek more global success this year. The RJR Sports Foundation’s annual awards ceremony was held at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel last Friday night. Bolt won his sixth Sportsman of the Year award, after copping titles in 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013, while Fraser-Pryce, who also won in 2012 and 2013, lifted her third Sportswoman of the Year title. Last year, Bolt returned from an injury-plagued start to the season to dominate the men’s sprints at the IAAF World Championships. He won gold medals in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m in Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Stadium where he had previously set world records in the 100 and 200 metres. “Six-time athlete of the year in Jamaica is always an honour,” Bolt told reporters. Personal best He pointed out that he is looking forward to a stress-free year, but was mindful of the demands ahead. “It’s just about trying to stay focused this year and staying on top of things and making sure everything runs smoothly … pushing myself, but also being aware of everything that is going on around me,” he added. Meanwhile, Fraser-Pryce, the three-time Sportswoman of the Year, also received the Sagicor Iconic Award at the function. The MVP Track Club star won gold medals in the 100m and 4x100m at last year’s World Championships in Beijing, China, as well as copping the Diamond League 100m title. “I am feeling blessed and I am feeling honoured,” she said. “For me winning an award is a signal that you did something right in 2015, and I am really honoured and blessed and grateful to be able to collect a third Sportswoman of the Year Award here,” Fraser-Pryce said.last_img read more