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USWNT vs. England: Sports stars react to Women’s World Cup thriller

Women’s World Cup 2019: 3 takeaways from USWNT’s thrilling win over England Women’s World Cup 2019: Alex Morgan sends USA into final despite Megan Rapinoe’s absence Stars from multiple sports took to social media during and after the thrilling 2-1 U.S. win in Lyon, France, cheering on the defending champions as they look to secure a fourth World Cup title.  Here’s a sampling of some of the social media reaction from big names across the sports world: Congrats #TeamUSA Women’s World Cup!!! So strong! What a game. Can’t wait for Sunday!— Drew Brees (@drewbrees) July 2, 2019Congrats to team USA on an exciting game and spectacular win. Awesome stuff ladies and so fun to watch. Good luck in the finals as 👀 will be watching 😎 and pulling hard for you. 🇺🇸— Phil Mickelson (@PhilMickelson) July 2, 2019Let’s gooo @USWNT⚽️🇺🇸— John Wall (@JohnWall) July 2, 2019.@Cal athletes everywhere. #onetogo #gobears #itsacalthing #WomensWorldCup2019 #hbd https://t.co/DF0IjdDNnp— Aaron Rodgers (@AaronRodgers12) July 2, 2019Congrats @USWNT!! @amy_cole23 & I have had a blast following along! And Happy Birthday @alexmorgan13! https://t.co/0QDsaLC63t— Gerrit Cole (@GerritCole45) July 2, 2019Ball don’t lie!!!!!! #USA— Victor Cruz (@TeamVic) July 2, 2019Congrats and great win @USWNT! On to the Final! #Congrats #usa— Evan Longoria (@Evan3Longoria) July 2, 2019What a save!!!!! pic.twitter.com/85rw8yj8Sp— Devin&Jason McCourty (@McCourtyTwins) July 2, 2019READY TO RUN THROUGH A BRICK WALL! GO USA!! 🇺🇸 @DrinkBODYARMOR @mPinoe https://t.co/C67C4zv6cL— Sue Bird (@S10Bird) July 2, 2019Congrats USA 🇺🇸 #USAvENG https://t.co/HzZTjseiw1— Daniel Suárez (@Daniel_SuarezG) July 2, 2019  Related News It wasn’t just sports fans across the U.S. who were enthralled by Tuesday’s Women’s World Cup semifinal against England. Elite athletes were locked in, too.  read more

Exposure to bright light may have big impact on sleeprelated behavior in

first_imgJul 18 2018Settling youngsters down to sleep at night isn’t always easy. Recent research suggests that the amount of exposure children have to bright light in the hour leading up to bedtime -; whether emanating from light bulbs or electronic devices -; can have a big impact on sleep-related behavior.There’s chemistry behind it. Our circadian rhythm -; a kind of 24-hour internal brain clock that cycles regularly between sleepiness and alertness -; employs melatonin, the body’s natural sleep-inducing hormone. Melatonin is highly sensitive to light. As daylight dims toward the end of the day, our bodies are programmed to react to the reduction of light by increasing the production of melatonin. It’s nature’s way of ushering us toward sleep. Artificial light, however, can disrupt the circadian cycle by inhibiting the production of melatonin.Related StoriesDynamic Light Scattering measurements in concentrated solutionsMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsSleep makes synapses ready for new learningResearch into the effects of light on preschool-age children found that youngsters are particularly sensitive to light exposure in the hour prior to bedtime. (Children’s clear crystalline eye lens and large pupil size render them generally more sensitive to light than adults.) According to some researchers, evening light exposure, with its melatonin-suppressing effect, may increase the likelihood of sleep disturbances in preschool-age children. When little ones shuffle out of a dark or dimly lit bedroom to tell parents “I’m thirsty” or “I heard a strange noise,” the bright light they encounter has been found to reduce their melatonin production, making it all that much harder for them to fall asleep when back in bed. Even reading bedtime stories in a brightly lit room can make it harder to fall asleep at story’s end. Dimming the ambient light, in both the child’s room and whatever spaces they might walk into, maybe a wise approach whenever possible.Mobile electronic devices, with their bright white screens, pose a similar risk. As many as 90% of preschool-age youngsters use devices, often during the hour before bedtime. But it’s not only preschoolers; youngsters of all ages find themselves glued to screens as the very last activity of their day. Studies found that following light exposure, melatonin remains suppressed for nearly an hour after the lights go off -; time for tossing and turning and missing out on essential shut-eye. Parents might declare the last hour prior to bedtime a device-free period, or insist that youngsters slide the brightness setting way down on their handheld electronics.Source: https://www.family-institute.org/last_img read more