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World Athletics to rule on Russia ahead of Olympics

first_imgYevgeny Yurchenko is the new head of the Russian athletics federation Loading… World Athletics is to decide Thursday whether to start the procedure of reinstating the new-look Russian athletics federation, as well as initiating the process to allow Russian athletes who test clean to compete under a neutral banner at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. High jumper Mariya Lasitskene has attacked Russia’s handling of the doping crisis Russia has been suspended by World Athletics (then known as the IAAF) since 2015 over repeated doping scandals – a ban upheld 12 times – and has been fighting for readmission. The last report by World Athletics’ Task Force, in November, led to its decision-making Council suspending the process of reinstating RUSAF over charges against its officials that they obstructed an anti-doping investigation. The Council also put a freeze on the system of allowing Russian athletes to compete as “Authorised Neutral Athletes”. Those decisions prompted wholesale change at RUSAF, which has a newly-appointed head in Yevgeny Yurchenko.Advertisement Coe, Yurchenko said, “will initiate the process of issuing to Russian athletes neutral status permits for their participation in international tournaments”, with RUSAF’s membership reinstatement with World Athletics “set to be launched”.That promises to be good news for three-time high-jump world champion Mariya Lasitskene, who has been vocal in her criticism of the former RUSAF regime for its handling of the scandal.Lasitskene, pole vault world champion Angelica Sidorova and men’s 110m metres hurdles star Sergey Shubenkov held a meeting with Coe last week, reportedly on relaunching the so-called “ANA scheme”, which allows eligible Russian athletes to compete as neutrals at events.Moscow’s case has been made more complicated after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in December imposed a four-year ban from all international sporting competitions on Russia over what it considers a state-sponsored programme of doping, a suspension the country took to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).CAS, the world’s highest sporting court, will now have to decide whether to confirm the WADA ban, or listen to Russia’s case against the sanction. A ruling is not expected before May, with the Tokyo Olympics scheduled to start on July 24, in just 134 days.The International Olympic Committee said CAS had to make a clear-cut decision, with no room for “any kind of interpretation”, over whether Russia was to be banned not just from Tokyo, but also the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing and the 2022 football World Cup in Qatar. Read Also: English clubs could be forced to play behind closed doors todayIn Monaco, the World Athletics council will also discuss the effects of the spread of the coronavirus, with several members, including those from outbreak hotspots China and Italy, taking part remotely by teleconference because of travel restrictions in their countries.The COVID-19 outbreak has already caused the world indoor championships in Nanjing, China, due to be held this month, to be delayed by a year, and the world half-marathon champs in Gdynia, Poland, to be re-scheduled from March 29 to October 17.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldWorld’s Most Beautiful Ceilings That Will Take Your Breath AwayWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?12 Marvel Superheroes When They Were Kids7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World15 Celebs Whose Careers Were Thwarted After One Simple MistakeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World? In one of his first conciliatory moves in the stand-off, Yurchenko sent two letters to World Athletics, the first “concerning our cooperation and in regard to scandalous situations, which had left an impact on our relations for many years”. Yurchenko said he had agreed with accusations made by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) against RUSAF on the wrongdoings in the case of high jumper Danil Lysenko, in which “forged documents and false explanations” were provided as an alibi to his whereabouts, as required by anti-doping rules. In January, the AIU, the independent anti-doping watchdog for track and field, recommended World Athletics maintain the exclusion of RUSAF and the freeze on Russian athletes competing under a neutral flag unless it failed to provide evidence in the Lysenko case, which had proved to be a tipping point. – Negative consequences – Yurchenko, who also apologised for the negative consequences from the Lysenko case, said his second letter was sent to World Athletics chief Sebastian Coe.last_img read more

Williams Industries International Race Meet… Persaud scores Guyana’s only win

first_img-Podium finishes for King (By Stephan Sookram in Barbados, compliments of Secure Innovations and Concepts Inc, Miracle Optical, Nexus Machining and Fabrication Workshop, Trans Pacific Motor spares and Auto Sales, BM Soat Auto Sales and Spares)DANNY Persaud produced Guyana’s only win on a day when mechanical issues ran rampantat the Williams Industries International Race Meet at the Bushy Park Circuit, Barbados.Kristian Jeffery’s SR3 holding off William Myers of Jamaica.Persaud, driving the Buy Me Auto Sales’ Mazda Miata, picked up the top spot in the last group three and four combined race of the day after nursing home an ailing car.Changing several parts between Saturday and Sunday at the track, he overcame his difficulties to snag the win against a charging Tremaine Forde-Catwell.Persaud, who spoke to the media said, “I’m just glad to pick up a win and do my country proud. We had a long weekend of changing parts but in the end, one first and one third is a good weekend for us.”In race one, Persaud picked up a third place finish behind Suleman Esuf and Kerick Husbands, in that order, while he failed to make it past corner one in the second race.Vintage King shows class There was also a second place finish for Andrew King who personified the Guyanese weekend in Barbados.Qualifying second on Saturday, King fell out of the first race after just one lap with differential problems, leaving Jamaica’s Kyle Greg to take the win ahead of Barbados’ Mark Maloney.While the team worked hard ahead of the second race, they were unable to get the car out in time.In the third race, however, King came back strong in chase of Mark Maloney before the latter fell out, leaving first place for Greg.Rameez Mohamed (19) on the charge during the group two event.Bright spark for Rameez MohamedRameez Mohamed, after a seventh place qualifying in group two on inferior rubber, was able to acquire ‘grippier’ tyres before race one.The advantage gained by the new rubber was exponential, moving from seventh to fourth before half of the first lap was complete.He continued to claw his way up the field to second before car troubles eventually forced him out of the race.Despite his engine trouble, Rameez’s car was obviously one of the fastest group two cars on the track which will be a positive for him moving forwardHe said, “That’s how racing is sometimes. The car felt great before it breaks but that’s just how it happens. When we get back home we will check to see what’s the problem.Troublesome weekend for JeffreyIf Guyana’s problems were mechanical, then Kristian Jeffrey was Guyanese to the bone.No faster had he fixed his small problem yesterday than it returned on Sunday.Starting sixth, he moved up to fourth, ending there.In the second race, which featured a reverse qualifying grid, Jeffrey suffered gear problems from the start, having a poor start after the car would not go into first gear.When he finally got going, after falling back to seventh, Jeffrey carefully cut through the pack up to fifth before the issue again stepped in, ensuring that he could not challenge for any other places.In the third race, the issues would prove too much for the young Jeffrey who did not start.The team will return home today.last_img read more

Exposure to bright light may have big impact on sleeprelated behavior in

first_imgJul 18 2018Settling youngsters down to sleep at night isn’t always easy. Recent research suggests that the amount of exposure children have to bright light in the hour leading up to bedtime -; whether emanating from light bulbs or electronic devices -; can have a big impact on sleep-related behavior.There’s chemistry behind it. Our circadian rhythm -; a kind of 24-hour internal brain clock that cycles regularly between sleepiness and alertness -; employs melatonin, the body’s natural sleep-inducing hormone. Melatonin is highly sensitive to light. As daylight dims toward the end of the day, our bodies are programmed to react to the reduction of light by increasing the production of melatonin. It’s nature’s way of ushering us toward sleep. Artificial light, however, can disrupt the circadian cycle by inhibiting the production of melatonin.Related StoriesDynamic Light Scattering measurements in concentrated solutionsMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsSleep makes synapses ready for new learningResearch into the effects of light on preschool-age children found that youngsters are particularly sensitive to light exposure in the hour prior to bedtime. (Children’s clear crystalline eye lens and large pupil size render them generally more sensitive to light than adults.) According to some researchers, evening light exposure, with its melatonin-suppressing effect, may increase the likelihood of sleep disturbances in preschool-age children. When little ones shuffle out of a dark or dimly lit bedroom to tell parents “I’m thirsty” or “I heard a strange noise,” the bright light they encounter has been found to reduce their melatonin production, making it all that much harder for them to fall asleep when back in bed. Even reading bedtime stories in a brightly lit room can make it harder to fall asleep at story’s end. Dimming the ambient light, in both the child’s room and whatever spaces they might walk into, maybe a wise approach whenever possible.Mobile electronic devices, with their bright white screens, pose a similar risk. As many as 90% of preschool-age youngsters use devices, often during the hour before bedtime. But it’s not only preschoolers; youngsters of all ages find themselves glued to screens as the very last activity of their day. Studies found that following light exposure, melatonin remains suppressed for nearly an hour after the lights go off -; time for tossing and turning and missing out on essential shut-eye. Parents might declare the last hour prior to bedtime a device-free period, or insist that youngsters slide the brightness setting way down on their handheld electronics.Source: https://www.family-institute.org/last_img read more