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Green Mountain Coffee Roasters honored by McDonald’s

first_imgGreen Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc (NASDAQ: GMCR) was chosen from among hundreds of submissions from around the world to be included in the McDonald’s 2010 Global Best of Sustainable Supply. The Best of Sustainable Supply recognizes best practices of companies that demonstrate leadership and innovation in sustainable supply. McDonald’s first introduced Newman’s Own Organics coffee roasted by Green Mountain Coffee, part of GMCR’s family of brands, to its restaurants in New England and Albany, NY in October 2005.“This recognition affirms the importance of our efforts to seek sustainable solutions to poverty and hunger in communities around the world that supply us with coffee”GMCR was selected for its efforts to fight poverty and hunger in its coffee supply chain. In 2007, GMCR commissioned the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) to conduct one-on-one surveys with small-scale coffee farmers in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua. The survey showed that more than 67 percent of the interviewees could not maintain their normal diet from 3 to 8 months of the year. These months, known as “los meses flacos,” or “the thin months,” occur after the coffee harvest, when farmers’ earnings have been depleted and the price of food staples rises.Under the leadership of Rick Peyser, Director of Social Advocacy and Coffee Community Outreach, GMCR initiated support of projects with the goal of eliminating “los meses flacos” by helping families diversify their production and income. A coalition of nonprofit organizations and Fair Trade coffee cooperatives including Save the Children, Heifer International, Catholic Relief Services, Café Femenino, Community Agroecology Network (CAN), Pueblo a Pueblo, CECOCAFEN, and CESMACH have created a web of projects across multiple regions. Since 2007, GMCR has funded 14 projects in 10 countries, which are starting to help more than 18,000 families (over 96,000 people) develop the capacity to overcome months of food insecurity in a sustainable manner.“This recognition affirms the importance of our efforts to seek sustainable solutions to poverty and hunger in communities around the world that supply us with coffee,” said Peyser. “We believe there is a direct link between the quality of coffee we purchase and the quality of life in the farming communities that grow this coffee. As such, we are focused on supporting projects that improve the quality of life. Reducing food insecurity improves health, enhances children’s ability to learn, and provides families with new opportunities to begin lifting themselves out of poverty. When farmers and their families are unable to maintain their normal diet, they are generally not able to invest in their coffee, so this work will also help improve the quality of coffee in the cup.”The 2010 Best of Sustainable Supply was recently announced during McDonald’s 2010 Worldwide Convention and is featured on its Corporate Social Responsibilityweb site.About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR)As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea, and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Green Mountain Coffee®, Newman’s Own® Organics coffee, Tully’s Coffee®, and Timothy’s World Coffee®. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of licensed roasters and brands, including Green Mountain Coffee, Tully’s Coffee and Timothy’s. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certified™ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.gmcr.com(link is external) for more information.GMCR routinely posts information that may be of importance to investors in the Investor Relations section of its web site, including news releases and its complete financial statements, as filed with the SEC. GMCR encourages investors to consult this section of its web site regularly for important information and news. Additionally, by subscribing to GMCR’s automatic email news release delivery, individuals can receive news directly from GMCR as it is released.Source: WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–4.27.2010last_img read more

LD returns 8.7% in 2014 on Danish equities, US investment growth

first_imgDenmark’s LD pension fund reported an investment return of 8.7% for 2014, and said strong returns on Danish shares and US investments in general had pushed profits higher.The return compares with 8.8% for the previous year.LD director Dorrit Vanglo said: “This is a really good result that we are very pleased with — seen both in the light of modest growth in the economy and the very low level of inflation.”While rising prices on the Danish equities market helped drive overall investment returns higher, the fall in interest rates over the year had increased profits on both general bonds and corporate bonds, LD said. “We have had positive returns in all funds, and when we look outside the country’s borders, it was particularly investments in the US that gave good results,” said Vanglo.She predicted that it would be the US that pulled the world economy forward in 2015 as well.At the same time, the stronger dollar meant goods produced in Europe would be relatively cheaper, thus making European business more competitive, she said.Assets under management rose by DKK1.2bn (€161m) in 2014 to end the year at DKK54.6bn, after payments made to members of DKK2.5bn.LD is a non-contributory pension scheme based on cost-of-living allowances granted to workers in 1980, and as such it receives no new contribution inflows.Vanglo said LD’s costs were being kept to an absolute minimum.“There are just 15 staff at LD and we have tight control over our suppliers, under which costs fall when overall assets and the number of members fall,” she said.For more on LD’s investment startegy, see investment editor Martin Steward’s interview with Dorrit Vanglolast_img read more

Dewes, Wambold expect to take over catching duties for SU after Lundstrom transfer

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 29, 2015 at 12:07 am Contact Liam: lpsull01@syr.edu Leigh Ross expected Nicole Lundstrom to be her catcher for four years.But when she transferred to Providence in the offseason, Ross, the SU head coach was faced with the task of replacing arguably her best offensive weapon.This year, she’ll do that by turning to a two-catcher rotation of sophomore Alyssa Dewes and senior Julie Wambold. They’ll take over responsibilities behind the plate and fill the void offensively.“As a coach you never know what’s going to come up,” Ross said “… and so I’m asking the two of them to play important roles for us.”Lundstrom was the Orange’s starting catcher in her freshman season, ranking first on the team in at-bats (154), second in runs batted in (32), third in runs scored (29) and fourth in batting average (.312). Ross said the team would miss her bat, but also said that Dewes and Wambold are more than capable of filling the void.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDewes and Wambold hit .307 and .309, respectively last season, however, neither played an inning at catcher. While replicating Lundstrom’s power will be hard to do, both players were regulars in the SU lineup last season. Their offensive contributions were enough for Ross to expect them both to be in the lineup no matter who is behind the plate.Ross said the starting catcher would be determined game-by-game and would see how it played out from there. Dewes and Wambold both believe the change in position is only making them work harder.“We push each other to do better,” Dewes said. “Watching her work and get after it in practice only makes me want to do the same. I don’t think we’re competing with each other.”Defensively, the transition for both players hasn’t been as tough as it would be teaching the position to someone for the first time. Dewes and Wambold both played catcher in high school so there is a level of familiarity.Dewes was a catcher throughout her childhood and high school and even was originally recruited to play catcher. Ross described Wambold as an “all-around athlete” who also caught a little bit in high school.She receives “quietly and smoothly” behind the plate, Ross said, having great hands and a quick release. Those physical tools match well with the experience and confidence she brings to the table as a senior. Dewes, though a sophomore, has the stronger arm.“Having two great catchers is going to be great this year. They each do something different really well behind the plate and in the way they handle pitchers,” pitcher Lindsay Larkin said. “Every pitcher is comfortable with both of them calling a game.”The catchers have been working on lots of drills to improve on blocking loose balls, framing pitches and picking runners off base.The most improvement Ross has seen has come from live bullpen sessions where Dewes and Wambold have been developing chemistry with the team’s pitchers. She is encouraged by what she’s seen, despite the fact that neither has caught in a game for SU before.“It’s like riding a bike,” Wambold said. “It doesn’t take much to get back in the swing of things. Just lots of reps.” Commentslast_img read more