first_img Five of the teams that participated in this year’s renewal of the Development Bank of Jamaica’s (DBJ) National Business Model Competition (NBMC) for tertiary institutions will represent the country in the 2018 International Business Model Competition (IBMC) in Utah, USA, from May 10 to 11. The UWI’s Skolastik Oasis and NCU’s Beasc Technology were also invited to participate. Heading the record list of entrants is University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona Campus-based market research entity, Queritel, which topped the six teams participating in the recent NBMC finals at The Knutsford Court Hotel, New Kingston, to emerge as Jamaica’s official representative at the IBMC. Five of the teams that participated in this year’s renewal of the Development Bank of Jamaica’s (DBJ) National Business Model Competition (NBMC) for tertiary institutions will represent the country in the 2018 International Business Model Competition (IBMC) in Utah, USA, from May 10 to 11.Heading the record list of entrants is University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona Campus-based market research entity, Queritel, which topped the six teams participating in the recent NBMC finals at The Knutsford Court Hotel, New Kingston, to emerge as Jamaica’s official representative at the IBMC.Queritel will be joined by first and second runners-up, Eco-Structures and Pneulyfe, representing the UWI and Northern Caribbean University (NCU), respectively.The UWI’s Skolastik Oasis and NCU’s Beasc Technology were also invited to participate.This year’s record number of NBMC entrants results from Jamaica securing four of the 12 coveted spaces offered in the IBMC’s highly competitive ‘At Large Round’, a feat never before accomplished.The DBJ’s Jamaica Venture Capital Programme Project Coordinator, Audrey Richards, who coordinates the NBMC, describes this as a “tremendous achievement”.“It endorses the work our universities are doing in building future business leaders. It is an endorsement of the quality of the judges at our competition, and it sends a signal that the work we, the Development Bank of Jamaica though the Jamaica Venture Capital Programme, are doing with our universities and, indeed (towards) the development of a robust entrepreneurial ecosystem, is on the right path,” she says.There is great anticipation of Jamaica doing well again in the upcoming IBMC, to replicate and even surpass impressive performances recorded by teams entering since 2014, when the country sent its first representative.Jamaican teams have consistently finished in the top 10, despite competing against thousands of participants from over 40 colleges and universities across the world.The 2014 NBMC winner, Herboo Enterprise, placed eighth; 2015 champion, JarGro Enterprise, reached the semi-finals; 2016 winner, Guardana Inc, which received honorary mention – sixth; and 2017 champion, Natsima Nutraceuticals – fourth.The replication or surpassing of these placements would cap a record-breaking year for the NBMC, which saw the UWI, through Queritel, winning the competition for the first time and, in the process, breaking NCU’s dominance of the initiative since its inception.The competition, which is designed to encourage and promote the creative and innovative thinking of students, facilitates local entrepreneurial skills and enhances collaboration and communication between stakeholders in the private sector and academia.According to Querital’s Vice President for Marketing and Operations, Kedonne Martin, “originally the idea for Queritel was (to name the entity) Research Aid Plus, which came up after realising that students on campus needed research work done and they needed help with this… so they came to us”.“After working with this idea for a year and pitching it, we realised that it made more sense to (market it) to entrepreneurs, who would be more willing to pay for this service. So, we pivoted to Queritel and, since then, we have had over 120 customers and made over US$6,000 in revenue, and it has been amazing. Winning this competition is another form of validation for us, and we are so happy for it,” he says.The members of Querital copped the winning prize of $2 million, plus an all-expense paid trip to the IBMC, slated for the prestigious Utah Valley Convention Centre and the Provo Marriott Hotel and Conference Centre.Prizes totalling $4 million were up for grabs in this year’s NBMC, which was sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank, through the Multilateral Investment Fund; PanJam Investment; Restaurant Associates, through its flagship brand, Burger King; Musson Foundation; NCB Foundation; Sagicor Group; Scotiabank; GK Capital Management; and the PetroCaribe Development Fund.The IBMC is sponsored by the Kevin and Debra Rollins Centre for Entrepreneurship and Technology in the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University, headquartered in Provo, Utah.The entrepreneurship programme at the Marriott School, which has campuses/students across the United States and in 105 other countries, is consistently ranked among the top such offered, annually. 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first_imgSYDNEY, N.S. – A young aboriginal man who sexually assaulted a 16-year-old friend “exhibits great potential” despite a difficult upbringing and should not face a lengthy jail term, a Nova Scotia judge says.Judge James Chipman sentenced Davis Joseph Prosper to four months in jail in a decision the judge said took Prosper’s aboriginal status into account.“The case before me does not involve a position of trust or a child victim,” Chipman said in a Nova Scotia Supreme Court sentencing decision handed down June 16 in Sydney and released in written form Monday.“On the facts in context, I accept that Mr. Prosper’s actions were impulsive. He acted for his own sexual gratification at great expense to the victim. Having said this, he made no threats and there was no striking, choking or sexual intercourse.”Prosper, who is in his early 20s, assaulted the girl while she was texting her boyfriend in her bedroom on the Eskasoni First Nation in August 2015, according to the ruling.He tried to take off her shorts and sexually assaulted her underneath her clothing.The ruling said her boyfriend told Prosper, either by text or by phone, to leave the house.“What took place can hardly be regarded as a victimless crime. True damage was done and we can only all hope that the continuing passage of time will provide some relief and closure,” said Chipman.Crown attorney John MacDonald had sought a two-year jail term for what he called “a major or serious sex assault,” while defence lawyer Blair Kasouf suggested 90 days intermittently.“It appears to have been an impulsive, immature act. There were no threats, striking, choking or sexual intercourse,” Kasouf told the judge.Chipman said he was satisfied Prosper, who is currently unemployed and living with his uncle, took responsibility for his actions and expressed remorse.He quoted from Prosper’s pre-sentence report that said “he has experienced the adverse effects of the toxic social environment and poor socio-economic conditions that continue to impact the lives of aboriginal people since the time of colonization.”Prosper pleaded guilty.Along with the jail sentence, Chipman also sentenced Prosper to 18 months probation and, among other measures, banned him from owning firearms for 10 years, except “to hunt for sustenance.”“Given the circumstances of the crime, along with Mr. Prosper’s status … I am of the view that despite a difficult upbringing and poor socio-economic status, Mr. Prosper exhibits great potential. In these difficult circumstances, I have decided that a fit and proper sentence should not involve a lengthy period of incarceration as sought by the Crown,” Chipman said.last_img read more

first_img Source:https://canal.ugr.es/noticia/obesity-and-food-restrictions-proven-to-be-associated-with-less-food-enjoyment/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 13 2018Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) belonging to the Mind, Brain and Behavior Research Center (CIMCYC, from its name in Spanish) and the Faculty of Business and Economics have proven that adolescents who suffer from obesity feel less food enjoyment than those who have a normal weight. In addition, their work reveals that even trivial restrictions on food intake (that is, temporary diets) are associated with a reduction in pleasure.For this work, published in the journal Food Quality and Preference, a large sample of 552 adolescents between 11 and 17 years old from several high schools in Granada has had their emotional reactions analyzed during the visualization of images of sweet foods.Related StoriesResearchers propose new avenue in the search for anti-obesity drugsSupervised fun, exercise both improve psychosocial health of children with obesityNew technique reduces postoperative deficit of oxygen in the blood in patients with morbid obesityThus, the researchers observed that those adolescents who reported different types of dietary restrictions (different types of diet, dieting very often, skipping breakfast, eating less frequently, etc.), along with those who were obese and those who had unhealthy behaviors unrelated to food (such as smoking or having insufficient sleep), felt less pleasure, attraction and desire to eat the highly palatable foods they were looking at (images of sweets, donuts, ice‑creams, chocolate crêpes, etc.).As explained by Laura Miccoli, main author of this study, “adolescence, typically associated with greater body dissatisfaction, is a key stage for the development of risky eating behaviors, related both to uncontrolled restrictions on food intake -which may lead to to the development of eating disorders- and with the stabilization of overweight and obesity.” Hence the importance of studies that approach both food‑related disorders from an integrative perspective.A pioneering studyNot in vain, the research led by the UGR is the first study that has examined the adolescents’ emotions toward sweet food cues based on a constellation of risk behaviors, related to both obesity and eating disorders.In the light of the results obtained, the UGR scientists point out that those adolescents who feel more pleasure or enjoyment when eating “have a healthy relationship with food, and this pleasure may be a possible protective factor against eating and weight‑related disorders.”Therefore, “consistent with recent prevention strategies, it is important to change the perspective on the enjoyment of food with respect to the prevention of obesity, banishing the idea that we should avoid the pleasure of eating. On the contrary: we should take advantage of it, and make food enjoyment -the ‘slow food movement’- a tool for healthy eating,” Miccoli points out.last_img read more

first_img Source:https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/775169 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 17 2019Oxidants found within living organisms are byproducts of metabolism and are essential to wound-healing and immunity. However, when their concentrations become too high, inflammation and tissue damage can occur. University of Illinois engineers have developed and tested a new drug-delivery system that senses high oxidant levels and responds by administering just the right amount of antioxidant to restore this delicate balance.The findings are published in the journal Small.Many pharmaceuticals include specialized polymers and particles that control the timing or concentration of the drug released once administered, the researchers said. However, these additives can hamper crystallization during the manufacturing phase of some drugs – like antioxidants – causing them to dissolve in the body in an uncontrolled manner.”We saw an opportunity here to develop a different kind of drug-delivery system that could sense the level of oxidant in a system and respond by administering antioxidant as needed,” said chemical and biomolecular engineering professor and study co-author Hyunjoon Kong.Kong and his team found a way to assemble crystals of catechin – the bright green antioxidant found in green tea – using a polymer that can sense when oxidant concentrations become too high. The researchers tested the responsiveness of the resulting catechin crystal-containing polymer in the common freshwater planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna, the water flea.”Heart rate is an indication of the extent to which potentially toxic chemicals influence physiology in water fleas,” Kong said. “Daphnids are often used to monitor environmental impacts on ecological systems, and because their hearts are similar to those of vertebrates, they are also used to evaluate the efficacy of cardioprotective drugs.”Related StoriesChronic inflammation removes motivation by reducing dopamine in the brainCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart diseaseStudy measures antioxidant levels in edible insectsThe researchers exposed the daphnids to water contaminated with sublethal concentrations of the natural oxidant hydrogen peroxide while monitoring their heart rate. They found that the daphnids’ mean heart rates dropped from 348 to 290 and 277 beats per minute, depending on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide used.When the team added the new catechin crystal assembled with polymer to the experiment, the water fleas eventually recovered a close-to-normal heart rate.Beyond the potential pharmaceutical uses for the new polymer, Kong’s group is looking into its use for curtailing the impact of highly oxidizing chemicals in natural waterways.”Hydrogen peroxide is often used to clean water fouled by excessive algae, and this raises concern about how the oxidant may be affecting living organisms in water,” he said. “We think this new antioxidant-delivery system could be used to address the problem of over-oxidized natural waters.”The researchers plan to push ahead with developing the polymer for pharmaceutical and environmental uses. “This study proved a concept, but we have more work to do,” Kong said. “There is concern over the safety of the specific polymer we used – polyethylenimine diselenide – but we are getting close to finding a viable replacement.”last_img read more

first_imgOver 32,000 employees of the Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport Undertaking are on strike since last Tuesday   –  Prashant Waydande COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL Protest enters seventh day; over 3,200 buses off the roads RELATED January 14, 2019 Maharashtra SHARE strike Mumbai bus strike enters 6th day Published on COMMENTS Opposition parties on Monday hit out at the BJP and Shiv Sena for the BEST bus strike which entered its seventh day in the metropolis even as an official of the civic-run transport undertaking expressed hope that a High Court hearing later in the day will provide a solution.Over 32,000 employees of the Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport Undertaking (BEST) are on strike since Tuesday last week and 3200-odd buses in its fleet are off the roads.Striking workers are demanding the merger of BEST’s budget with the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, the former’s parent body, as well as higher wages.Talks over the last week between a State government committee led by the Maharashtra Chief Secretary and striking BEST unions have failed to break the impasse.The Nationalist Congress Party and the Aam Aadmi Party on Monday questioned the motives of the ruling BJP-Shiv Sena alliance and asked why the strike had been allowed to linger on for a week.NCP spokesperson Nawab Malik on Monday said, “BEST strike enters 7th day to promote wet leasing of buses to benefit Shiv Sena leaders. Similar ploy was played in Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation (MSRTC) buses. The Shiv Sena should clarify how many buses belong to their leaders.”He added: “The BJP will also hand over electric supply to their friend Adani. The Shiv Sena and the BJP are holding Mumbaikars to ransom to benefit their leadership.”Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) leader Preeti Sharma Menon, while expressing her party’s support to workers, alleged the State government was “anti-labour”.“We support the demands of the strikers and are shocked that the government is unaffected by the longest BEST strike ever. This government is anti-labour. It had also turned a deaf ear to the MSRTC’s strike last year,” she said.last_img read more