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Biopharmaceutical Research

first_imgThe University of Georgia is partnering in a biopharmaceutical innovation institute that aims to boost market production of cell-based therapies and develop a skilled workforce to work in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry.The new public-private partnership, called the National Institute for Innovation of Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL) will focus its efforts on driving down the cost and risks associated with manufacturing advanced cell and gene therapies for biopharmaceutical production.Steven Stice, director of the UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and D.W. Brooks Distinguished Professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is the UGA lead in the partnership, which is coordinated by the University of Delaware.NIIMBL represents a total investment of $250 million, including $129 million in private cost-share commitments from the NIIMBL consortium of 150 companies, nonprofits, educational institutions and state partners across the country, combined with at least $70 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce.NIIMBL is the 11th institute under the Manufacturing USA National Network for Manufacturing Innovation initiative created to advance manufacturing leadership and restore jobs to the U.S.This recent success follows an announcement in 2016 by the U.S. Department of Defense that an MIT-led team involving UGA was selected for funding as the eighth NNMI institute.“We are pleased to have UGA participate in these high-profile public-private partnerships that are aimed at advancing U.S. leadership in key manufacturing sectors,” said UGA Vice President for Research David Lee. “We are eager to assist industry partners in meeting their goals through the development of new and existing intellectual property, and the training of an appropriate workforce.”Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly showing promising results in treating some of the most prevalent and debilitating diseases affecting human health. But manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals is not without large-scale operational and technological challenges, Stice said.These biologically sourced drugs are different from traditional small molecule, synthesized drugs. For example, he said, the synthesized drug ibuprofen can be precisely copied and characterized, and result in varied generic versions. In contrast, biopharmaceuticals like vaccines are much more complex and rely on the use of a biological transformation. As living cells, they are highly sensitive to their conditions and surroundings.Technical projects, which will be designed by the industry partners of the institution, will be selected through a competitive process and funded via subaward agreements with NIIMBL members.Stice, a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, will facilitate team assembly for response to the project calls, leveraging years of collective experience in regenerative medicine and technology development. He is also co-director of the Regenerative Engineering and Medicine research center, or REM, a collaboration by Emory University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and UGA. “There is a crippling regulatory gap, which is commonly referred to as ‘the valley of death’ in moving biotech products from discovery to commercialization,” Stice said. “What NIIMBL presents is an opportunity to help improve government regulation, minimize failure, create job growth and improve health care quality, all while reducing costs in the U.S.”For more information about the role UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center plays in developing biotechnology that will shape the future visit www.rbc.uga.edu.last_img read more

Christmas arrives at the White House

first_imgChristmas has officially arrived at the White House and this year’s theme is “The Spirit of America!”First Lady Melania Trump tweeted about this year’s theme late Sunday night and accompanied it with a minute long video.More detailed photos of the decorations where then posted early Monday!What do you think?last_img

Ex-Miccosukee cop is sentenced after forcing teens to strip naked

first_imgA former Miccosukee Police officer has been found guilty of forcing two teens to strip naked during a traffic stop back in 2016.Michael Martinez pulled over 18-year-old Kyle Shoulta, and Remy Riley near mile marker 48 of Alligator Alley, for running a stop sign. He then offered them a deal to run naked and avoid jail time.Martinez appeared in court and was found guilty on two counts of extortion and two counts of unlawful compensation. He has been sentenced to 10 years.last_img

NASA Researchers, Doctors Treat First Known Blood Clot in Space

first_imgWhen astronauts suddenly experience a medical situation on the International Space Station 250 miles above Earth, the terms “emergency room” or “urgent care” take on a unique meaning.Late last year, NASA researchers suspected that one of their astronauts was suffering from a blood clot during a long duration stay on the space station.The clot was detected during a vascular study of 11 astronauts that was intended to assess the effect of space on the internal jugular vein. In zero gravity, astronauts’ blood and tissue fluid shifts toward the head.The study involved nine men and two women who were an average age of 46. Their identities were not included in the study.A new assessment of the blood clot was published last Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.Six of the participating astronauts experienced stagnant or reverse blood flow, another one had a blood clot, and yet another was considered to have a potential partial blood clot.Scientists weighed the risk of the blood clot, as well as its potential to block a vessel in the absence of gravity.Dr. Stephen Moll, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, was the only non-NASA physician who was consulted to help the affected astronaut.He says, “My first reaction when NASA reached out to me was to ask if I could visit the International Space Station to examine the patient myself. NASA told me they couldn’t get me up to space quickly enough, so I proceeded with the evaluation and treatment process from here in Chapel Hill.”Moll is a member of UNC’s Blood Research Center and is a blood clot expert.“Normally the protocol for treating a patient with deep vein thrombosis would be to start them on blood thinners for at least three months to prevent the clot from getting bigger and to lessen the harm it could cause if it moved to a different part of the body such as the lungs,” Moll adds. “There is some risk when taking blood thinners that if an injury occurs, it could cause internal bleeding that is difficult to stop. In either case, emergency medical attention could be needed. Knowing there are no emergency rooms in space, we had to weigh our options very carefully.”He spoke with the astronaut during a “phone call from space,” consulting with them as if the person were one of his other patients.The pharmacy aboard the space station contained 20 vials with 300 milligrams each of an injectable blood thinner. Moll directed the astronaut to use them on a daily basis until an anticoagulant drug could be sent to the station during a resupply mission.The astronaut took a higher dose of the injectable, called enoxaparin, for 33 days in order to control the risk of the blood clot. The dose was lowered after that time, as the astronaut awaited the arrival of the drug apixaban.The researchers watched the clot shrink over time. Blood flow was then induced after 47 days through the vein, although spontaneous blood flow was not achieved, even after undergoing treatment for 90 days.The blood clot disappeared 24 hours after landing. Six months later, the astronaut was still free of symptoms.According to Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, study author, NASA astronaut and clinical associate professor of medicine at Louisiana State University’s Health New Orleans School of Medicine, “We still haven’t learned everything about Aerospace Medicine or Space Physiology.”She adds, “The biggest question that remains is how would we deal with this on an exploration class mission to Mars? How would we prepare ourselves medically? More research must be performed to further elucidate clot formation in this environment and possible countermeasures.”last_img read more

Florida man dead after being shot with his own gun during home invasion

first_imgThe Manatee County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that a suspect has died after he broke into a home and was shot with his own gun.The incident was reported Friday in Bradenton, Florida.The resident told authorities that the now identified suspect, 26-year-old Demetrius Downer, broke into his home and placed a pistol next to his head while he was sleeping.Downer then reportedly began beating the victim with the gun and during the struggle, the victim gained control over the weapon.The victim then shot Downer and ran next door to alert a neighbor to what was happening.When authorities arrived at the scene, they found the gun inside the home and the backdoor of the home opened, however, Downer was nowhere in sight.After canvassing the areas, authorities located Downer’s body on the ground against a condo building near the home.Officials reported that it appears that Downer died due to the single gunshot wound.last_img read more

CDC says to avoid all ‘nonessential’ trips to China amid coronavirus outbreak

first_imgThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised travelers to avoid all non-essential trips to China amid a coronavirus outbreak that has sickened thousands, and killed hundreds.The CDC has issued a Level 3 travel advisory to all of China.Authorities say the coronavirus was first discovered last month in Wuhan, China. It has since spread at a rapid rate to nearly three dozen other countries, including the United States, where health officials have confirmed five cases of the viral infection.last_img read more

Thurston County REALTORS End the Year with More Giving

first_imgFacebook158Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston County REALTORSThurston County REALTORS Association (TCRA) installed their 2019 officers and board and raised money for several charities at their Installation Luncheon and Holiday Charity Auction on December 6, 2018. The annual event drew nearly 200 attendees and was held at Indian Summer Golf & Country Club in Olympia, Wash.Wreaths, arrangements and gift baskets contributed by local businesses and individuals lined the large ballroom at the country club for the Holiday Charity Auction that raised more than $7700, a record amount for what has become a yearly event. The money raised by each item went to the charity chosen by the item’s winning bidder.At the event, REALTORS also presented a $6000 check—part of the proceeds from the Association’s annual fundraising golf tournament last September—to the Thurston County Food Bank. The Association had also donated a portion of the money raised at the tournament to the REALTOR Relief Fund that provides help for those who experience devastating loss from disasters like the recent California wildfires.Newly installed TCRA President Kevin Gordham says that in 2019, REALTORS will continue their many charitable activities that contribute so much to local Thurston County communities.“We are out in the community daily helping clients find or sell a home here and the quality of life we all enjoy is one of the biggest attractions to the area,” says Gordham. “Our Association members are dedicated to community giving and support.”Thurston County REALTORS have installed their 2019 officers. Photo courtesy: Thurston County REALTORSThe 2019 officers installed at the event are:President: Kevin Gordham, Keller Williams Realty South SoundPresident-elect: Christina Janis, Epic RealtyTreasurer: Kim Torres, Academy MortgageTreasurer-elect: Necia Leach, Thurston County TitleSecretary:  Michelle Mewhinney-Angel, Windermere Real Estate/OlympiaPast-president: Tonia DeBeaux, John L Scott, Puyallup Main Along with its officers, 10 of the local organization’s board members were also sworn in.A day following the Luncheon, about 100 TCRA members, many of whom donned Santa hats and other festive wear, rang bells and sang carols in front of several area stores to help fill the traditional Salvation Army’s Red Kettles during Thurston County REALTORS® Ring Day.Many REALTOR Associations across Washington state and the U.S. participate in Ring Days in December. TCRA has participated in their event organized by REALTOR® Gregory Moe of Windermere Real Estate/Olympia for the last several years. This year, they helped raise more than $18,700 for the Salvation Army–Olympia Corps.“The enthusiasm for the day was incredible,” added Gordham. “Our members devote their time to help the less fortunate. We are motivated by our care for the community, the wonderful place where we help people find a home. Ring Day is just one of the local REALTORS’ charitable activities in a year that is filled with giving.”The Thurston County REALTORS Association is a professional trade association of more than 700 REALTOR and Affiliate members and is dedicated to protecting homeownership, ethics and professionalism within the real estate industry.last_img read more

Hawks shoot down Bombers 1-0 in Field Hockey Final

first_imgTo represent Nelson at the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Field Hockey Championships next month in North Vancouver, the L.V. Rogers Bombers need to play a few more games.J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks of Trail scored in the first minute en route to a 1-0 victory over the Bombers in the final of the West Kootenay Field Hockey Championships Wednesday at Pass Creek Park in Castlegar. The win was the first of the season for Crowe over LVR.The Bombers now take the back door route to provincials, competing in a Wild Card Game against #2 Okanagan and the #3 Fraser Valley Teams Tuesday (October 29), in Kelowna on the Mission Creek Turf  Fields.If the Bombers win the final, it’s off to the  AA Provincials in North Vancouver on November 6-8.Check out the Bombers athletics page at www.lvr.sd8.bc.calast_img read more