first_imgYour Excellency Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, President of the Republic of Liberia, Your Excellency Joseph Boakai, Vice President of the Republic of Liberia; Your Excellency Alex J. Tyler, Speaker of the House of Representatives; Honorable Ministers, Ambassadors and Heads of Diplomatic Agencies and International Organizations, Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen.I wish to thank you, President Johnson-Sirleaf, for inviting me to Liberia. And thank you, especially for the singular honor of this State dinner. My staff and I have received very warm reception since we arrived in Monrovia this afternoon.Madam President, I wish to celebrate you this evening. You are a jewel to Africa. You are for me, personally, a great source of inspiration. There is no better way for me to round up the celebration of the International Women’s Day than to be here in Monrovia to visit with my elder sister, Africa’s first female President. At the African Development Bank, we are particularly grateful to President Johnson-Sirleaf for chairing the High Level Panel on Fragile States. Her depth of knowledge and intellectual insights, undergirded by solid global and African experience, helped us all to wake up: to realize that we must not look at fragility as a permanent state of nations; but rather, use fragility lenses in understanding the challenges faced by countries undergoing democratic, social and political transitions. Madam President, just over one year ago, I sat in the hallowed chambers of the African Union during the African Union Summit and listened attentively to you as you exposed this new approach. I was convinced that indeed, for Africa to move forward, we need women in top leadership positions. The elegance, the poise, the humane nature, the pulse of your heart were felt all over the hall. No wonder the world listens to you – we feel your heartbeat for development. I congratulate you on your recent appointment by the United Nations Secretary General, Ban ki-Moon, as Co-Chair of the High Level Panel on the Sustainable Development Goals. Madam President, you are Liberia’s best gift to the world for our common good.Your Excellency, I commend you for steering Liberia towards political stability and economic recovery in spite of the decade long conflict. That is why we at the African Development Bank will do everything possible to support you and Liberia. Reconstruction, peacebuilding and state building take time, but I can assure you that this beautiful country of Liberia is on the right path. Liberia is a resilient nation. Over the period 2006 to 2015, Liberia had good macroeconomic performance: GDP growth rate averaged over 7%, inflation was brought down to within single digits, and total external debt reduced from US$ 4.7 billion to US$ 412 million. And just when the country was enjoying better macroeconomic stability, the Ebola crisis hit. The cost was enormous: 4,800 beautiful Liberian souls were snuffed out by the disease and communities were devastated. Businesses and the economy took a beating, as real GDP growth shrank to just over 1.8%, from a high of 8.7% in 2013. Adversities come in life, but the ability to overcome them is what marks out great leaders. President Sirleaf-Johnson, you displayed amazing leadership. Within one year, the Ebola Viral Disease was eradicated in Liberia. Liberia was the first among the three Mano River Union countries to be declared Ebola free. The African Development Bank provided $56 million in budget support to combat the crisis. Let me pay a special tribute to all the people of Liberia: across all communities, you all stood up and today you stand tall out of a major adversity. That is the Liberian spirit- the spirit of resilience!That is why the African Development Bank stands fully on the side of the Liberian people in your drive to keep moving forward. The Bank has always been here, through the thick and thin, the ups and the downs. Since 1967 when it started operations in Liberia, the Bank has financed operations to the tune of over US$ 1 billion. Overall, the Bank’s current portfolio in Liberia comprises 17 operations for a total commitment value of US$ 383 million, with the infrastructure sector (roads, energy, and water and sanitation) accounting for 53% of total commitments. Yet challenges still remain and there is more to be done. For example, only 2% of the Liberian population has access to electricity and about 50% are living in extreme poverty. It is in response to these challenges, which are common across the whole of Africa, that the African Development Bank has now sharply focused its work on five top priorities for Africa, which we call the High 5s: Light up and power Africa; Feed Africa, Industrialize Africa; Integrate Africa; and Improve the quality of life for the people of Africa. These are all well aligned with Liberia’s priorities, hope and aspirations of Liberia, as articulated in the Agenda for Transformation.As blood is to the body, so is electricity to the life of any economy. However, over 645 million Africans currently do not have access to electricity. Today, 700 million Africans do not have access to clean cooking energy, with 600,000 dying each year, mainly women and children, from indoor pollution due to reliance on fuelwood, charcoal and biomass for cooking. Africa is simply tired of being in the dark. That is why the African Development Bank has developed the New Deal on Energy for Africa to accelerate universal access to energy by 2025. Under the New Deal, the African Development Bank plans to invest US$12 billion in the energy sector over the next five years and we hope to leverage US$40-50 billion into the energy sector. We are also establishing a “Bottom of the Pyramid Energy Financing Facility” to provide clean cooking stoves and support energy access for the poorest segments of the population in African countries. And we are starting right here in Liberia, where electricity access rate is 2%. The Bank approved US$200 million financing for the Cote d’Ivoire-Liberia-Sierra Leone -Guinea regional electricity interconnection project. Upon completion, this project is expected to increase the electricity access rate in Liberia and reduce the cost of electricity from 58 US cents per kilowatt hour in 2013 to 15 US cents by 2020. The second High 5 is “Feed Africa”. Africa currently spends over US$ 35 billion in food imports every year, even though the continent has 65% of the world’s total arable land. The Bank is now embarking on a bold effort – together with other development partners- to totally transform Africa’s agricultural sector. Our goal is simple: ensure that Africa become self-sufficient in food and turns itself into a global powerhouse in food and agriculture. Our focus will be on agriculture as a business, to add value to agricultural commodities, diversify economies and turn rural areas into new zones of economic prosperity. Liberia has huge agricultural potential – from rubber, cocoa, cassava and rice. And there is no reason for Liberia to be importing rice at over $100 million annually. Madam President, let us make Liberia fully self-sufficient in rice. It can be done and it will take less than four years. I am pleased to let you know that your Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Moses Zinnah, did his PhD thesis research under my supervision in the early 1990s. We looked at the technology potentials for rice in the Sierra Leone and Guinea. Today, he is your Minister of Agriculture. I am confident that he will perform and with your support help drive Liberia to become self-sufficient in rice within four years. In this regard, I commend you, Madam President, for setting up and personally chairing the Agricultural Transformation Implementation Council to drive the implementation of the transformation agenda. The Bank will strongly support this major initiative to ensure a resurgent agriculture sector. Already the Bank is supporting the development of an electronic wallet system that will allow farmers across the country to access improved seeds and fertilizers via electronic vouchers on their mobile phones – a successful initiative that I launched in Nigeria, as the Minister of Agriculture, before my election as President of the Bank.Our third High 5 is to “Industrialize Africa”. Africa currently accounts for just over 2% of the world’s merchandise exports. Many African countries, including Liberia, are over-dependent on commodity exports and are therefore subject to global commodity price volatilities. Africa must create industrial growth engines that will propel it to become competitive in value addition and manufacturing. The Bank will continue to support the private sector and financial market development in Africa in order to foster rapid industrialization, and help Africa move to the top of global value chains. That is why the Bank is currently supporting the Program for Trade Support Institutions in Liberia (PATSIL) with a grant support of about one million dollars, to further strengthen institutional capacities of the Liberian Chamber of Commerce, the National Ports Authority and the Ministry of Commerce and Industry.Our fourth High 5 is to “Integrate Africa”. Africa currently accounts for only 2% of global trade and intra-African trade is just about 12% compared to 69% in Europe, and 53% in Asia. Regional integration is therefore critical for boosting economic growth in Africa. Our collective destiny is tied to breaking down the barriers separating us. The Bank will continue to invest heavily in high quality regional infrastructure—especially rail, transnational highways, power interconnection, information and communications connectivity, air, inland waterways and maritime transport. The integration of the Mano River Union is a priority for the Bank to improve access to basic infrastructure services, foster increased trade, competitiveness and regional security. That is why the African Development Bank approved US$ 106 million for the Mano River Union Road Development and Transport Facilitation Program to support the construction of 277 km road network to link Guinea, Liberia and Côte d’Ivoire. The fifth High 5 is “improve the quality of life for the people of Africa. We will focus on improving access to water, sanitation, public health care infrastructure, education and skills development, and programs to create jobs for Africa’s rapidly growing youth population. The Bank is currently developing a Jobs for Africa’s Youth Initiative which will target 50 million youth over ten years and support the creation of 25 million jobs for the youths across Africa. Already, the Bank approved in December 2015, US$ 1 million financing for the Youth Employment and Entrepreneurship Project in Liberia. This project – which I am delighted will be launched this month – will support the creation of 40 new sustainable businesses, 40% of which will be women-owned, and build the capacity of 2,400 students to better prepare them for the labor market. To further strengthen social resilience of Liberia, and support speedier recovery from the impacts of the Ebola crisis, the Bank is co-financing with the U.S. State Department the $2.7 million initial seed capital for Post Ebola Social Investment Fund, which was approved in October 2015 for Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. The fund will increase access to basic infrastructure and financial services for 5,000 Ebola survivors, 2000 orphans, and 6,000 micro and small enterprises. Your Excellency, Ladies and Gentlemen, Liberia has come a long way. I am confident that the future looks bright for Liberia. I will like to assure you that the African Development Bank will always be your partner of choice. As the African Development Bank starts next week the 14th replenishment of the African Development Fund – so we can provide more concessional loans and grants to low income countries such as Liberia – the resilience story of Liberia is one that must be heard. That is why I thank you very much Madam President for agreeing to be a champion for the African Development Fund replenishment and for deciding to be with us in Abidjan next week for the discussions. As Albert Einstein said “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving”. Liberia must keep its balance – and Liberia must keep moving forward. And as it does, the African Development Bank will always be there to support you.Your Excellency, Madam President, I now raise my glass to toast to your good health and continued success, and to an even stronger partnership between the Republic of Liberia and the African Development Bank. Long live the Republic of Liberia! Thank you very much and God bless you all.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img2 August 2005Two 190-million-year-old dinosaur embryos from a group of seven eggs have been identified as the oldest dinosaur embryos yet found. Discovered in South Africa, they are also the oldest known embryos for any terrestrial vertebrate – and the oldest evidence that dinosaurs were caring parents.The embryos are of an Early Jurassic prosauropod dinosaur, according to Dr Mike Raath of the Wits Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontological Research (BPI). Raath is one of five authors who describe the embryos in the 29 July 2005 isssue of leading international journal Science.“The embryos belong to the early sauropodomorph dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus,” he says. “These skeletons are quite common in South Africa and range in size from small juveniles to full adults, up to about five metres in length. This identification is a major coup, because embryos are often difficult to identify to species.”The late Professor James Kitching of the BPI discovered the cluster of eggs and their the embryos at the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the northeastern Free State in 1977.These are the oldest known dinosaur embryos. Two were exposed in the group of seven eggs. One of them is almost complete, and appears to be trapped in the act of hatching.The embryos are the oldest known for any terrestrial vertebrate, and so the oldest embryos in an amniote egg known from anywhere in the world.Since their discovery the eggs sat on a shelf in Wits University’s fossil store, awaiting someone with the necessary skill to prepare the fossil eggs for detailed study. The tiny embryonic bones are extremely delicate, and intricately curled up in the eggs.“In January 2000, Professor Robert Reisz of the University of Toronto at Mississauga in Canada was on a research visit to South Africa, and borrowed the fossil eggs to take back to Canada,” says Raath. “There Diane Scott of his lab carried out the detailed and difficult preparation under high magnification using a special microscope and achieved spectacular results.”Robert Reisz (left) with James Kitching, who discovered the fossilised dinosaur embryos in 1977 (Photo: Wits University)The growing dinosaurThe embryos provide significant insights into the growth and development of this early dinosaur. Raath explains that this discovery allowed the team to reconstruct in detail the growth trajectory of Massospondylus, from pre-hatchling to full adult – a first for any dinosaur.Reisz, the project leader, points out that adults and juveniles of other types of dinosaur are known, but they are usually either recovered from bone beds, where the skeletons are broken up, disarticulated and scattered, or the rare articulated skeletons are not sufficient to reflect a growth series.The growth trajectory of Massospondylus shows that this dinosaur started out as an awkward-looking little quadruped with had a relatively short tail, a horizontally held neck, long forelimbs and a huge head.As the animal grew, the neck grew faster than the rest of the body, but the forelimb and head grew much more slowly than the rest of the body, so the body proportions changed dramatically as the animal grew.Weird-looking animalThis means that Massospondylus changed from a tiny quadruped into a weird-looking large animal with a long neck (still held horizontally), a thick, massive tail, a very small head, short forelimbs, and long hind limbs.The result is an adult animal very different from the embryo, and probably at least partly bipedal. In other cases where embryos and adults are known, as in the hadrosaurs or duck-billed dinosaurs, such dramatic changes in body proportions are not shown.The embryos also provide clues about the origin of the quadrupedal gait of the giant sauropods (the brontosaurs) of later times, which are descendants of the prosauropods.The embryo of Massospondylus looks like a tiny sauropod with massive limbs walking on all fours. This means the quadrupedal gait of sauropods may have evolved through paedomorphosis – the retention of embryonic and juvenile features in the adult.“Some people think that humans too are products of paedomorphosis,” says Raath.Caring parentsThe absence of well-developed teeth in the two preserved embryos, which were clearly on the point of hatching, and the overall awkward body proportions suggest that the hatchlings required parental care of some kind for some time after emerging from the egg.If this interpretation is correct, it constitutes the oldest known indication of parental care in the fossil record.The embryos are about 190-million years old, from the Early Jurassic Period. Most other known dinosaur embryos are at least 100-million years younger, from the Cretaceous period of 80- to 65-million years ago.The five co-authers of the Science paper are Professor Robert Reisz, Diane Scott, David Evans, Dr Hans-Dieter Sues, and Dr Mike Raath.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESAll About Water HeatersImproving Water Heater EfficiencyHeat-Pump Water Heaters Come of AgeA New Efficiency Standard for Gas FurnacesRefrigerators Get New Efficiency Standards Water heaters larger than 55 gallons will see a much bigger jump in efficiency. The new standards for these larger water heaters can be met using electric heat pump and gas condensing technology. Heat-pump water heaters save at least 50 percent and condensing gas units about 25 percent compared to today’s conventional water heaters.Heat-pump water heaters (also known as hybrid water heaters) transfer heat from the surrounding air to the water. When hot water demand is very high or the ambient air temperature drops below a threshold level, the hybrids switch from heat pump mode to electric resistance mode.According to DOE’s analysis, a consumer purchasing these highly efficient units will save more than $600 over the life of the product compared to a water heater just meeting the current efficiency standards. While the upfront cost to purchase and install these products is higher, consumers will recoup the added cost in about six years on average through lower electricity bills. Consumer Reports tested heat-pump water heaters and found that “Those we tested provided annual savings of about 60 percent over electric-only models.”One key concern about heat-pump water heaters is low temperature operation. When the heat-pump water heater operates in electric resistance mode, it doesn’t save energy or money compared to a conventional unit. Research by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance showed that some early heat-pump water heater models were cutting over to electric resistance mode at relatively high ambient temperatures.Manufacturers have been working to lower the minimum temperature at which water heaters operate in heat pump mode. Recent models have made significant progress, ensuring heat pump operation down to ambient temperatures as low as 35 degrees. The vast majority of utility programs in the Northwest point to the Northern Climate Specification Qualified Products List to determine whether a heat-pump water heater qualifies for utility incentivesCondensing gas water heaters are not as common as heat-pump water heaters, but consumers have more choices today than they did just a few years ago. Conventional gas water heaters lose much of the energy burned up the flue. Condensing water heaters are designed to reclaim much of this escaping heat by cooling exhaust gases well below 140 degrees F, where water vapor in the exhaust condenses into water.Water heaters will get a little biggerA review of manufacturers’ web sites shows that the height and/or diameter of some conventional products will increase 1 to 2 inches (some less than an inch) due to added insulation.For many homes, particularly those with basement installations, the small increase in size will have little impact. Consumers with space constraints (e.g., water heaters in closets or crawl spaces) should consult manufacturers’ web sites or local installers for options. Consumers may find that a product from one manufacturer fits better in their tight space than a similar product from a different manufacturer.Manufacturers are offering webinars, online videos, and educational materials to guide consumers, contractors, and installers through the changes. Several web sites include cross-reference guides to help consumers compare current models to models meeting the new standards. You will find most of the educational materials on manufacturer websites under NAECA (National Appliance Energy Conservation Act), the legislation that authorized appliance efficiency standards.What about grid-enabled water heaters?Utilities represented by the National Rural Electric Cooperative (NRECA) and the American Public Power Association, along with PJM Interconnection (regional grid operator) raised concerns that demand-response programs for water heaters over 55 gallons would suffer if they were required to switch to heat-pump water heaters.In these programs, utilities control the use of grid-enabled (connected) water heaters to manage energy use at peak times, resulting in large savings. Though some stakeholders claim that heat-pump water heaters can provide the services that NRECA and others desire, not all stakeholders are convinced that they will work as well. A legislative fix to establish a class of water heaters for demand-response programs is pending in Congress. In addition, some manufacturers have petitioned for waivers for this application.Marianne DiMascio is the outreach director of the Appliance Standards Awareness Project at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. This blog was originally posted at ACEEE and is used here with permission of the author. From the rustic 1850s pump shower to the 1920s Humphrey automatic to today’s modern units, water heaters have made great strides in performance and efficiency. On April 16, water heaters will take the next great stride when manufacturers must comply with new Department of Energy (DOE) efficiency standards.The most common water heaters manufactured on and after this date will get a modest boost in efficiency, while units over 55 gallons will shift to next-generation technology, cutting utility bills by one-fourth to one-half depending on the technology.What’s coveredCompleted by DOE in 2010, the standards cover gas, oil, and electric residential tank water heaters, usually between 20 and 80 gallons. (DOE also upped the efficiency levels for instantaneous — tankless — gas water heaters, but most models already meet the new efficiency levels.)Water heating is on average the second largest household energy expense behind space heating, representing about 18 percent of total household energy consumption in the U.S. Consumers annually pay an average of about $170 (gas) and $300 (electric) to operate a water heater just meeting current efficiency standards. About 50 percent of U.S. households use natural gas water heaters, 41 percent electric, and the remainder propane or oil.DOE estimates that the new efficiency measures will save 2.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy over 30 years and net consumers up to $8.7 billion in savings. Over the same period, the standards will reduce CO2 emissions by 154 million metric tons. To put these long-term savings in perspective, the savings are enough to meet the total energy needs of 13 million typical US homes for a year, and the CO2 savings are equivalent to taking 32 million passenger cars off the road for a year.Most storage water heaters to get a modest boost in efficiencyFor storage water heaters with volumes of 55 gallons and below (representing the vast majority of sales), the new standards will increase the efficiency of typical-sized units by 4 percent on average. Manufacturers plan to meet the efficiency levels with incremental improvements such as improved heat exchangers (gas) and more insulation. Water heaters that comply with the new standards are already on the market, including models from the three large domestic manufacturers (A.O. Smith, Bradford White, and Rheem) that make most water heaters sold in the United States.last_img read more

first_imgTwo Naxals, including a woman, were killed in an encounter with the security forces in the forests of Chhattisgarh’s Sukma district on July 29, police said. The firefight occurred around 7 am in the forest near Kanhaiguda village under Konta police station limits when a team of the District Reserve Guard (DRG) was out on a counter-insurgency operation, Deputy Inspector General (Anti-Naxal Operations) Sundarraj P told PTI.“When the patrolling team was advancing through the forest — located around 500 km away from the capital Raipur — a gun battle broke out with Naxals,” the DIG said. “After the firing stopped, we found the bodies of two ultras, including one woman, clad in uniform.” Two firearms were also recovered from the spot, the officer said, adding that further details were awaited as the search operations were continuing in the area. The DIG said patrolling had been beefed up in the forests and interiors of all seven districts of the Bastar division — Dantewada, Bijapur, Bastar, Narayanpur, Kondagaon, Sukma and Kanker — as Maoists are observing “martyrs’ week” from July 28 to August 3.last_img read more

first_imgClint Doliguez led the steamrolling with 12 points, 10 coming in the first quarter to set the tone for the beatdown.Calvin Oftana chipped in 12 points and had six boards and Radge Tongco got nine to make up for the absence of Robert Bolick, who had to be subbed out after suffering a minor knee injury early in the tussle.San Beda will face Ateneo in the other duel in the crossover semifinals.Mark Alcala paced La Salle with 12 points as La Salle, bannered by Team B players, exited the tournament winless.In the other game, University of Visayas gained some sense of pride after an 85-82 victory over Naga College Foundation.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 93 PLAY LIST 02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9300:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Balkman, Brownlee lead Alab past CLS Knights for 7th straight win LA SALLE 35 — Alcala 12, Yang 8, Cu 7, Souka 5, Lapena 3, Dominguez 0, Yongco 0, Tan 0, Angeles 0, De Robles 0, Calleja 0.Quarters: 18-7, 42-18, 62-29, 79-35.Third Game:LYCEUM 69 — Perez 19, Nzeusseu 19, Jc. Marcelino 15, Ayaay 4, Jv. Marcelino 3, Santos 3, Tansingco 2, Ibanes 2, Serrano 2, Caduyac 0, Cinco 0.ATENEO 65 — Wong 10, Black 9, Ravena 7, Maagdemberg 6, White 5, Ma. Nieto 5, Navarro 5, Mi. Nieto 4, Verano 3, Mamuyac 3, Mallillin 2, Go 2, Andrade 1, Tio 0, Asistio 0.Quarters: 16-20, 34-36, 49-52, 69-65. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting View comments Mike Nzeusseu finished off an and-one play with 1:54 remaining to tilt the favor to the Pirates’ side before CJ Perez cashed in on his freebies to make it, 65-62, with 19 seconds to go.The Cameroonian Nzeusseu delivered a double-double of 19 points and 21 rebounds, while Perez got 19 markers, five boards, and four steals. Jaycee Marcelino added 15.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAdrian Wong was the lone bright spot for Ateneo with 10 points.Meanwhile, the Red Lions hardly broke a sweat as they destroyed the winless Green Archers with a 79-35 humiliation. AFP official booed out of forum NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Rey Suerte dropped 30 points, but more importantly, dished the go-ahead assist to Michael Maestre with 14.4 seconds to spare as the Green Lancers completed their comeback from 13 points down.Liberian Bassieru Sakor unloaded a double-double with his 13 markers and 13 rebounds to give the Cesafi champion its lone win in the tournament.Jaymar Allarey carried the Tigers with 16 points in the loss.The scores:First Game:UV 85 — Suerte 30, Sakor 13, Delator 8, Segumlan 8, Maestre 6, Gahi 5, Cabahug 5, Balabag 3, Soliva 1, Hassan 0, Albina 0, Butohan 0.NCF 82 — Allarey 16, Ojoula 13, Margallo 10, Lapinid 10, Hermonio 8, Magpantay 6, Lawas 6, Olayvar 3 Mangubat 3, Padua 0.Quarters: 17-26, 30-43, 59-59, 85-82.Second Game:SAN BEDA 79 — Doliguez 12, Oftana 12, Tongco 9, Tankoua 8, Noah 8, Cariño 6, Ejercito 5, Cabanag 4, Penuela 4, Bahio 4, Mocon 3, Abuda 2, Adamos 2, Bolick 0, Presbitero 0. Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLyceum outsteadied Ateneo down the stretch while San Beda romped La Salle as the two NCAA topped their respective groups in the Philippine Collegiate Champions League Elite Eight Sunday at the Ynares Sports Arena.The Pirates eked out a 69-65 win to sweep their group at 3-0 and draw San Sebastian in the crossover semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Read Nextlast_img read more