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FUSINA Repels Honduran Drug Gangs in Mosquito Coast Region

first_img“In order to prevent the inhabitants of Gracias a Dios from developing direct and indirect activities for the benefit of common and organized crime, state forces have currently been deployed on land, sea, and air to take full control of this region,” Col. Paz Escalante said. “We are implementing a strong social development program that seeks to improve the living conditions of indigenous communities.” By Dialogo June 16, 2015 Such collaboration was crucial in the operation that led to the capture of Zambulá Thompson. “The arrest was the result of coordinated work done by various government agencies, which are currently operating in the area of Gracias a Dios, all part of FUSINA and deployed by land, air, and sea to shield this area of operations,” FUSINA commander Infantry Colonel Gustavo Adolfo Paz Escalante told Diálogo. And in July 2014, U.S. federal authorities in Florida arrested Miguel’s and Luis’s sister, Digna Valle Valle. Honduran daily La Prensa reported in April that she had pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges and agreed to cooperate with U.S. federal prosecutors in exchange for a reduced sentence. Inter-agency and international cooperation is a key component of these efforts; for example, 400 Marines and pilots work in shifts to patrol sea and air routes throughout the day, while two ships patrol inter-oceanic waters. Meanwhile, a Military unit in the area coordinates these efforts with forces from U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). That initiative is being carried out by FUSINA, an organization comprised of 4,400 highly trained, equipped, and specialized men and women of the Armed Forces, the National Police, the Attorney General’s office, the Supreme Court of Justice (CSJ), the Immigration Agency and the Directorate for Intelligence. And their efforts have led to several successful security operations, including two major drug interdictions in the Mosquito Coast area. In mid April, FUSINA together with Navy personnel seized 691 kilos of cocaine on the Caratasca Lagoon in Puerto Lempira, the capital of Gracias a Dios department. The drug was hidden in six fishing boats traveling on the lagoon. And a week later, FUSINA agents conducted an operation that led to the capture of Jorge Zambulá Thompson, a Miskito man allegedly carrying 175 kilos of cocaine on a fishing boat in the department of Gracias a Dios. That initiative is being carried out by FUSINA, an organization comprised of 4,400 highly trained, equipped, and specialized men and women of the Armed Forces, the National Police, the Attorney General’s office, the Supreme Court of Justice (CSJ), the Immigration Agency and the Directorate for Intelligence. And their efforts have led to several successful security operations, including two major drug interdictions in the Mosquito Coast area. In mid April, FUSINA together with Navy personnel seized 691 kilos of cocaine on the Caratasca Lagoon in Puerto Lempira, the capital of Gracias a Dios department. The drug was hidden in six fishing boats traveling on the lagoon. And a week later, FUSINA agents conducted an operation that led to the capture of Jorge Zambulá Thompson, a Miskito man allegedly carrying 175 kilos of cocaine on a fishing boat in the department of Gracias a Dios. Government disrupts gangs in Gracias a Dios For example, in the Caribbean region of Honduras, some drug trafficking organizations are exploiting members of the Miskito indigenous people, using threats or promises of large amounts of money to persuade them to transport drugs. But the Honduran government is fighting back — aggressively focusing air, naval, and land forces against drug trafficking organizations as part of an overarching security plan known as Operation Morazán. Such collaboration was crucial in the operation that led to the capture of Zambulá Thompson. “The arrest was the result of coordinated work done by various government agencies, which are currently operating in the area of Gracias a Dios, all part of FUSINA and deployed by land, air, and sea to shield this area of operations,” FUSINA commander Infantry Colonel Gustavo Adolfo Paz Escalante told Diálogo. Agents with the Honduran National Inter-Agency Task Force (FUSINA) have made important inroads in the fight against transnational criminal organizations that operate in the Mosquito Coast region — particularly in remote areas that have become a haven for drug trafficking in recent years. As a consequence of FUSINA’s efforts, the Mosquito Coast region “can’t be regarded as a paradise for drug lords anymore,” said Eugenio Sosa, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH). Those forces have contributed to several major drug seizures and arrests of organized crime kingpins in recent months, including the captures of several leaders of Los Cachiros, a drug trafficking gang, and the leaders of the Los Valles drug trafficking group. The two busts in April denote a broader trend in Gracias a Dios, where transnational criminal organizations have pulled some Miskito people into drug trafficking by threatening them or offering them large amounts of money, Col. Paz Escalante said. The Miskitos are located in the Northeast region of Honduras, an area known as “The Honduran Mosquitia” — specifically from the mouth of the Rio Wanks (also known as Rio Coco or Rio Segovia) to Rio Tinto (also know as Rio Black) in Gracias a Dios. That organization, based in the department of Copán, was led by brothers Miguel Arnulfo Valle Valle and Luis Alonso Valle Valle. In October 2014, Honduran law enforcement authorities captured the two brothers; the Honduran government later extradited them to the United States, where they face federal drug trafficking charges. U.S. federal prosecutors allege the brothers led an organization which transported tons of cocaine from Colombia to Honduras and finally to the United States. Strategic security initiative Dismantling groups like Los Valles and Los Cachiros is part of the Honduran government’s broad security strategy. At least four drug cartels, including at one from Mexico and one from Colombia, operate in Honduras; and FUSINA operations have hit them hard, seizing some of their assets and capturing some of their operatives. Those efforts have reduced violence and overall crime in the departments of Olancho, Copán, Cortés, and the city of San Pedro Sula. Additionally, FUSINA, in cooperation with the United States government, has also disrupted Los Cachiros. In September 2013, the U.S. Treasury Department designated seven individuals and five businesses tied to the Honduran gang; and in January, the group’s alleged leaders — Javier Eriberto Rivera Maradiaga, alias “Javier Cachiro,” and his brother Devis Leonel Rivera Maradiaga — surrendered to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in January. Strategic security initiative Overall, since its launch on January 27, 2014, Operation Morazán has led to the seizure of more than 11,000 kilos of cocaine, most of it at sea; the execution of 3,927 arrest warrants, including extradition orders; and the dismantling of 55 criminal gangs. As a consequence of FUSINA’s efforts, the Mosquito Coast region “can’t be regarded as a paradise for drug lords anymore,” said Eugenio Sosa, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH). Those forces have contributed to several major drug seizures and arrests of organized crime kingpins in recent months, including the captures of several leaders of Los Cachiros, a drug trafficking gang, and the leaders of the Los Valles drug trafficking group. For example, in the Caribbean region of Honduras, some drug trafficking organizations are exploiting members of the Miskito indigenous people, using threats or promises of large amounts of money to persuade them to transport drugs. But the Honduran government is fighting back — aggressively focusing air, naval, and land forces against drug trafficking organizations as part of an overarching security plan known as Operation Morazán. And in July 2014, U.S. federal authorities in Florida arrested Miguel’s and Luis’s sister, Digna Valle Valle. Honduran daily La Prensa reported in April that she had pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges and agreed to cooperate with U.S. federal prosecutors in exchange for a reduced sentence. “We are tackling crime in the countryside, towns, and neighborhoods,” Col. Paz Escalante said. “We trust in God that we will be cleaning and increasingly reducing the crime rate in each of the neighborhoods of the different municipalities.” Additionally, FUSINA, in cooperation with the United States government, has also disrupted Los Cachiros. In September 2013, the U.S. Treasury Department designated seven individuals and five businesses tied to the Honduran gang; and in January, the group’s alleged leaders — Javier Eriberto Rivera Maradiaga, alias “Javier Cachiro,” and his brother Devis Leonel Rivera Maradiaga — surrendered to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in January. Overall, since its launch on January 27, 2014, Operation Morazán has led to the seizure of more than 11,000 kilos of cocaine, most of it at sea; the execution of 3,927 arrest warrants, including extradition orders; and the dismantling of 55 criminal gangs. The two busts in April denote a broader trend in Gracias a Dios, where transnational criminal organizations have pulled some Miskito people into drug trafficking by threatening them or offering them large amounts of money, Col. Paz Escalante said. The Miskitos are located in the Northeast region of Honduras, an area known as “The Honduran Mosquitia” — specifically from the mouth of the Rio Wanks (also known as Rio Coco or Rio Segovia) to Rio Tinto (also know as Rio Black) in Gracias a Dios. That organization, based in the department of Copán, was led by brothers Miguel Arnulfo Valle Valle and Luis Alonso Valle Valle. In October 2014, Honduran law enforcement authorities captured the two brothers; the Honduran government later extradited them to the United States, where they face federal drug trafficking charges. U.S. federal prosecutors allege the brothers led an organization which transported tons of cocaine from Colombia to Honduras and finally to the United States. Agents with the Honduran National Inter-Agency Task Force (FUSINA) have made important inroads in the fight against transnational criminal organizations that operate in the Mosquito Coast region — particularly in remote areas that have become a haven for drug trafficking in recent years. “In order to prevent the inhabitants of Gracias a Dios from developing direct and indirect activities for the benefit of common and organized crime, state forces have currently been deployed on land, sea, and air to take full control of this region,” Col. Paz Escalante said. “We are implementing a strong social development program that seeks to improve the living conditions of indigenous communities.” Government disrupts gangs in Gracias a Dios Inter-agency and international cooperation is a key component of these efforts; for example, 400 Marines and pilots work in shifts to patrol sea and air routes throughout the day, while two ships patrol inter-oceanic waters. Meanwhile, a Military unit in the area coordinates these efforts with forces from U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). Dismantling groups like Los Valles and Los Cachiros is part of the Honduran government’s broad security strategy. At least four drug cartels, including at one from Mexico and one from Colombia, operate in Honduras; and FUSINA operations have hit them hard, seizing some of their assets and capturing some of their operatives. Those efforts have reduced violence and overall crime in the departments of Olancho, Copán, Cortés, and the city of San Pedro Sula. “We are tackling crime in the countryside, towns, and neighborhoods,” Col. Paz Escalante said. “We trust in God that we will be cleaning and increasingly reducing the crime rate in each of the neighborhoods of the different municipalities.” In the area of La Mosquitia Excellent In my view this is an excellent magazine, positive and informative.last_img read more

Walters preparing to knock Lomachenko out

first_imgNICHOLAS, ‘The Axeman’ Walters, intends to make a spectacular return to the ring when he faces WBO World super featherweight champion Vasyl Lomachenko in Las Vegas on November 26.The 30-year-old former WBA featherweight champion, who fought to a controversial draw against Jason Sosa on December 19, 2015, intends to put that blemish on his unbeaten career behind him when he fights the Ukranian for all the marbles.“I’m going to knock him out,” said Walters, who started training for the fight in September at the Pedro ‘El Rockero’ Alcázar de Curundú Gym in Panama.“I’m training for that. Just like I did to Nonito (Donaire), that’s how I’m going to defeat him.”Walters, who can count the likes of former champions Donaire and Vic Darchinyan among his 11 knockout victims in his last 12 fights, believes he can do the same to the much-heralded Lomachenko who has lost once in his seven professional fights.”Any fighter can be knocked out, no matter who he is,” said Walters.“I like fighting the best and I like fighting against great technical fighters like Lomachenko. (He) is great, he knows what he is doing in the ring. But I always look for a knockout against whomever I fight. If I can do it quick, I will.”Lomachenko enhanced his fledgling, but already impressive reputation in June when he logged a sensational knockout over WBO World super featherweight title-holder, Roman Martinez. (Sportsmax.com)last_img read more

Lindsay Eastwood’s overtime goal gives Syracuse its first win, 5-4 over Lindenwood

first_img Published on October 19, 2018 at 10:41 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelman With 80 seconds left in overtime, Lindsay Eastwood scored her first goal of the season to give Syracuse (1-3, 1-2 College Hockey America) its first conference victory against Lindenwood (1-4, 0-1), 5-4, Friday in St. Charles, Missouri.SU recovered from a two-goal deficit with under 10 minutes left in the third period, netting three goals in a 2 minute and 7-second span. But the Orange lost their lead with less than four minutes left. Eastwood’s goal 3:20 into overtime helped SU avoid its worst CHA start since its inaugural season in 2008.Syracuse opened the game attacking with seven shots on goal in the first eight minutes, all of them saved by Lions’ goalie Jolene deBruyn. And when a Shelby Calof hooking penalty gave Lindenwood an early advantage, the Orange didn’t allow a shot on the power play. With two minutes left, SU capitalized on its first power-play of the day off of an Abby Moloughney goal, the first of her collegiate career. The Orange’s defense persisted in the first, outshooting LWU 21-8, and Moloughney’s score put SU on top. But Lindenwood responded on its first shot of the second period. A Cierra Paisley goal, her first of the season, from Taylor Kirwan tied the game at one apiece. The Lions followed their first score with a quick power play, but after three-straight shots they fell short. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textA minute after that advantage was wasted, the Lions recovered and beat SU goalie Ady Cohen again off a goal from Courtney Ganske. A power play 12 minutes into the period gave Syracuse a chance to equalize, but after recording six unanswered shots, it couldn’t score. Lindenwood converted two-thirds of its on-target shots in the second, turning its 1-0 deficit to a 2-1 lead. The Lions made the game 3-1 after a Jada Burke goal halfway through the third, but the Orange weren’t finished. SU and LWU traded shots for the next three minutes with the Orange down two. Eventually, SU’s Jessica DiGirolamo found the back of the net to cut the lead to one.Thirty-seven seconds later, Emma Polaski responded, netting her first score of the season to tie it at three. Lindenwood’s Maddison Stitt was penalized with tripping during the goal, and the Orange entered the next two minutes up a player.After a Sierra Burt shot, SU’s captain Allie Munroe controlled the puck. The defender wound back her stick and scored on deBruyn with less than 30 seconds left in the power play. The goal gave SU a 4-3 lead. But with under 4 minutes left in the period, Lindenwood responded with a Taylor Girard short-handed goal to tie it back at 4-4. Time was ticking down with less than two minutes left in overtime when Eastwood scored her first goal of the season, giving the Orange their first victory of the season. The Orange outshot LWU, 72-37, dominating on the offensive end in the third period. For 50 minutes of play, it looked like SU would spoil its shot output. But it didn’t. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more