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Norway launches reviews of oil fund on management, private equity

first_imgThe ministry has a policy of regularly conducting broad reviews of the GPFG in the run up its annual report, which it presents to parliament around the end of March.As part of the review, the ministry will also commission two consultancy reports on management costs and responsible management activities in other large funds. McKinsey and Inflection Point Capital Management are to put these reports together.The ministry said it had also sent letters in June to Norges Bank asking for advice and assessments on these topics.The management review group includes Magnus Dahlquist, professor at the Stockholm School of Economics, and Bernt Arne Ødegaard, professor at the University of Stavanger.Dahlquist is also research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London and at Network for Studies on Pensions, Ageing and Retirement in the Netherlands. Both he and Ødegaard have previously served on expert groups advising Norges Bank.The private equity group includes Trond Døskeland, associate professor at the Norwegian School of Economics, and Per Strömberg, professor at the Stockholm School of Economics. Norway’s ministry of finance has appointed two expert groups to review aspects of how its NOK7.7trn (€823bn) sovereign wealth fund invests.One group will look at the management of the Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), analysing the performance of its active management. It will make a recommendation regarding whether the size of the fund’s relative risk budget – or expected tracking error limit – should be adjusted.The second group is to assess whether the fund should be allowed to invest in unlisted equities. Although Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM) – part of the central bank Norges Bank and the fund’s manager – is already allowed to invest in unlisted real estate and in unlisted companies where that company intends to seek a listing, it cannot generally invest in private equity. The management review group is to submit its report by January 2018, the finance ministry said, while the private equity group has a December 2017 deadline for its report.last_img read more

DECISION ON DONEGAL RADIO LICENSE EXPECTED ON MONDAY

first_imgThe nerves are tingling between the two consortiums bidding for the North Donegal radio license.The license is, of course, held by Highland Radio which has the biggest local listenership across Ireland.But they are now under pressure by DLFM, a consortium fronted by former Highland boss Charlie Collins. It is now expected that an announcement on the license will be made on Monday.Both sides presented their pitch at the Radisson Hotel earlier this year.But there is no indication from the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland as to how the license will go.  DECISION ON DONEGAL RADIO LICENSE EXPECTED ON MONDAY was last modified: June 21st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie CollinsDLFMdonegalHighland Radioradio licenselast_img read more

Kavan Honored as MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week

first_img MVC Release/Video DES MOINES, Iowa – Senior midfielder Vanessa Kavan was featured in the MVC Scholar-Athlete Spotlight this week in recognition of her success on the field, in the classroom, and in the community. The Drake women welcomed a new member, Breslyn, to the team earlier this year. The six-year-old Breslyn was diagnosed with leukemia at age three, but she rang the bell in 2018 signaling her final chemo treatment. “I think being involved in the community is so important because it’s the best and easiest way to better your environment,” Kavan said. “It’s a great way to do the right thing. If you’re reaching toward this common goal with your community, you can make yourself better, you can make others better, and make all of your surroundings better. It’s incredibly important to live a positive and happy life.” A marketing major with a minor in graphic design, Kavan touts a 3.99 GPA and has been recognized before for her achievements in the classroom. In 2018, Kavan was named to the MVC’s Scholar-Athlete First Team, and earlier this year she received the President’s Council Academic Excellence Award. “Those are super meaningful because they show that I’ve put in so much work and it’s being recognized,” Kavan said. “It’s just a great honor to be a scholar athlete for the MVC.” Print Friendly Version Kavan has completed multiple internships in her time at Drake, highlighted by her time working for Above and Beyond Cancer and Closing the Care Gap. She also makes sure to fill a backpack with school supplies every Christmas to donate to a family in need. Breslyn and her family started Breslyn’s Blankets of Love to ensure the kids in hospitals would feel safe and comfortable. Kavan and her teammates raised money for the foundation and spent an afternoon making blankets to donate. To qualify for the spotlight, student-athletes must carry a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.20, have completed at least one academic year at a Valley institution, and must be at least a sophomore in academic standing. Student-athletes are also evaluated on their campus involvement and community service. Drake head coach Lindsey Horner pushes an initiative called Community in Action, or CIA, that encourages her team to spend time improving the lives of those around them. Kavan and her teammates dedicated themselves to the Courage League, an organization that enables kids with disabilities to participate in sports. Story Linkslast_img read more

New sports clubs for children with physical disabilities set to launch in Donegal

first_imgThe Irish Wheelchair Association Sport in conjunction with a number of Local Sports Partnerships and other local partners have come together to establish three new junior multi-sport Clubs for children, aged 5 – 15 years, with physical disabilities – including in Donegal.The Donegal Multi-Sport Club will launch on the September 10th and takes place every Tuesday from 6:30pm – 8:00pm at Crossroads and Killygordon Enterprise, Killygordon.Further multi-sport clubs will also launch in Meath and Laois/Offaly. Nicky Hamill, Irish Wheelchair Association’s Director of Sport, said: “This is an exciting time for IWA Sport and our partners.“The launch of these three junior multi-sport clubs will provide great opportunities for participation in a range of exciting sports and games in these counties and the surrounding regions.“We are delighted to work in partnership with the respective LSPs, local agencies and the many parents and volunteers who are supporting the establishment and ongoing running of the Clubs.“We’re very grateful to Sport Ireland and the Dormant Accounts Fund for supporting this exciting initiative”. For further details on the junior multi-sport club or how you could get involved, contact Therese Laverty on sidoactivedonegal@gmail.comNew sports clubs for children with physical disabilities set to launch in Donegal was last modified: August 24th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Mimic the mentor to improve soils and cut inputs

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest When considering how to maximize the productivity of Ohio’s agricultural lands for generations to come, there are more farmers taking cues from the ultimate expert on the subject — Mother Nature.For eons, she took care of the soils and developed them into some of the richest the world has ever seen. Now, as modern stewards of the land face the perennial challenges associated with agricultural production, there are some simple and broad concepts that are just scratching the surface of a very complex science that is just beginning to be understood.“We are trying to educate people to have the right ecological context. We forgot to look at the soil as a living ecosystem. We were not taught to synergize with it,” said Ray Archuleta, a USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation agronomist to 300 listeners packed into David Brandt’s Fairfield County farm shop earlier this month. “We are taking a more holistic view through biomimicry. We are giving people a new way of looking at the soil by learning to mimic the mentor and stop fighting it.”Ray Archuleta on learning from natureArchuleta encouraged the listeners to think about how the soils they farm were originally formed.“The soil in the forest and prairie are covered 24/7 and they have animals in the system. They have diversity and they are never bare. We need to follow some of those principles and mimic nature on our farms,” he said. “Buffalo, for example, group very tightly because of predators. Now some of our graziers are grouping cattle very tightly using hotwire. That gives us better manure distribution and we are getting great responses from our pastures.”Mother Nature is also a very low input, low cost operator.“If you teach people how the soil functions, they use fewer inputs that can end up in the waterways and it is less costly for the farm,” Archuleta said. “If we can cover the soil, sequester those nutrients and use the right soil tests, we are using fewer inputs.”Cover crops, no-till, animal manure — not complicated concepts in a broad sense, but Archuleta acknowledges that the challenges and complexities are in the details. This is a management intensive system, though some farmers are making it work.“You are farming with a complex system. We want an easy pill. We have diminished our soils for hundreds of years and fixing things takes time,” Archuleta said. “We have producers now who have cut their inputs dramatically, but it is a commitment and it is a system. People who don’t want to take risks — don’t even try covers and no-till if you are not willing to change and learn. But, if you want to change, reduce inputs and pass the farm to the next generation, come and learn. If you’re not committed, don’t do this. Cover crops have to be just as important as your main crops.”David Brandt, of course, is known around the country for his work with cover crops and long-term no-till on his Fairfield County farm where he has dramatically reduced inputs. One example is with herbicide costs.“We have seen a reduction in herbicides by as much as 50%. As we use cover crops that don’t mat down we are not seeing marestail, giant ragweeds or winter annuals out there in the fields. We still have the opportunity to use post if we want to and we pull the trigger if we need to, but 90% of the time we don’t have to pull that trigger,” Brandt said. “We are trying to mimic Mother Nature. We want in our cover crops plants that are short in stature, medium in stature and taller, just like your woodlots are. We will have root growth anywhere from three inches down to five feet deep.”Brandt and others have been able to increase yields and make similar and significant cuts in inputs including nutrients, fungicides and pesticides with long-term cover crop use.In terms of cuts in commercial fertilizer, the reductions can only be successfully implemented after several years with carefully managed no-till and cover crops, Archuleta said. Then, as the soil health and quality improves, the fertilizer requirements decrease. The key to this, though, according to Archuleta, is using the right soil test — the “Haney test.”Traditional soil tests measure the amount of nitrate in the soil, but do not account for the contributions of soil microbes that mineralize organic nitrogen and phosphate. Because of this, traditional soil tests often direct farmers with healthier soils to apply more fertilizer than is really needed.“The problem is that conventional tools are not measuring the right soil characteristics. They test for inorganic nitrogen in the form of nitrate, but that’s just one form of nitrogen available to the plant,” said Richard Haney, the soil scientist with the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil, and Water Research Laboratory who developed the “Haney test.”The “Haney test” involves drying and rewetting soil and analyzing it for microbial activity to measure nitrate and ammonium, plus an organic form of nitrogen. It also measures organic carbon and other nutrients. The drying and rewetting process mimics what happens in the field before and after a rain.The soil test results include a spreadsheet that shows the amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium available to plants along with measurements of water-soluble organic carbon, water-soluble organic nitrogen, and soil microbial activity. The results also provide a calculation of soil health and the ratio of carbon to nitrogen.The Haney test is available at laboratories around the country, including Brookside Laboratories in New Bremen. It adds to the time and costs for a soil test, but it saves on fertilizer costs. Brandt started using Haney’s system three years ago.“I estimate that it’s saved us at least 25% in nutrient costs,” Brandt said. “The readings were more accurate than other soil tests we had run, and we either maintained or increased our yields.”The road has been a little different for every farm success story Archuleta highlighted, but the basic concepts have proven themselves time and again for those who are willing to make the significant investment in the future of their soils.“First, expect failure. You will have failures. Expectations are everything,” Archuleta said. “Get organized have the right equipment and understand your cover crop varieties. Don’t do this alone. Build a soil health community you can rely on for advice. Incorporate diversity into your operation. Rotate animals and enterprise diversity so that farm becomes more resilient to ecological and economic stress. Be patient and try three to five years with covers and no-till.”last_img read more

How 21st century tech will drive transit regulations

first_imgFor most of our history, regulation has been the cart pulled along behind the technological horse. It was a clear cause-and-effect relationship: New tech was developed and put into broad use, then came the rules about how and when to use (or not use) it.In other words: We have speed limits because of the automobile, not vice versa.However, in the 21st century, the speed and scope of technological advances have served to drive regulation in a more proactive manner. The 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act mandated that healthcare providers shift to electronic medical records. Patients that are used to seeing doctors scribbling on pads or clipboards became accustomed to the sight of laptops and tablets in the exam room.And at the close of 2016, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s proposed rules that would require equipping cars and light trucks with wireless communication technology that could help avoid potential collisions. Indeed, the DOT believes this can help prevent up to 80 percent of accidents.When we have turned to technology-driven regulation here in the United States, it has typically been because of the advantages offered, most notably in the areas of safety, mobility, and health. Now Germany has given us another reason to base regulation on new tech and it is, unsurprisingly, efficiency.By 2019, the German transport ministry has announced, all paper tickets for transit will be phased out in favor of electronic tickets. There are already 10 million Germans using smart transportation ticketing, but the federal agency has mandated that public transit services – whether buses, subways, or other modes – will be accessed by “a nationwide e-ticket.”Brian Zanghi, Chief Executive Officer, MasabiWhy follow Germany’s lead?There is good reason for public and private transportation agencies in the United States to take a close look at the reasons behind Germany’s action, because those conditions exist in transit systems across this country, as well.Reduced costs: By eliminating physical infrastructure related to selling and printing tickets, as well as processing cash payments, maintenance and operational expenses are reduced. Budget and staff will be freed up for higher-priority jobs.Reduce fraud and improve security: Lost or stolen e-tickets can be canceled and replaced, unlike paper tickets. Fraud is reduced, as is the need for drivers and conductors to handle cash, which is another security risk.Convenience: A single electronic ticket that works across an entire transit system makes travel easier for passengers, who no longer have to juggle different tickets during their trip.Eliminating lines: Frustrating waits can have wide-ranging impacts on travelers. With no paper tickets to buy, ticket kiosks and the long lines they create will disappear. This helps smooth the traveler’s journey.These are priorities common to any transportation agency – public or private – and any mode of transportation, be it below ground, on the surface, across water, or through the air. The fact that so many of them can be addressed through a single tech-driven regulation should encourage local government officials, public agencies, and private transportation agencies to give serious consideration to follow Germany’s lead.We are now on the flip side of the car/speed limit equation. In the era of the Internet of Things – where virtually every object that can be connected will, at some level, be connected – we can expect technology-driven regulations to quickly become the norm. State- or agency-level mandates should take the initiative, given the benefits they can reap through leveraging technology to address these priorities. Brian Zanghi IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Tags:#Internet of Things#IoT#Masabi#Smart Cities#smart city center_img Related Posts Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Cities How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi…last_img read more

How to Get That Terrence Malick Look in Your Next Film

first_imgAll of the great directors have a signature style that is at once recognizable and wholly representative of their work. Perhaps one of the most iconic cinematic styles belongs to the enigmatic director Terrence Malick as seen throughout his four-decade career.Top image via WikimediaIn a conversation about Tree of Life, Christopher Nolan calls Terrence Malick’s work “instantly recognizable.”His films are all very connected with each other and very recognizably his work. But it’s very tough to put your finger on why that is or what you’re seeing in that the technique is not immediately obvious.While the Malick-style is built on a rich tapestry of motifs and pathos, the cinematic tropes are distinctive and actually quite achievable on projects big and small. Here are some of the key ingredients to capture that “Terrence Malick look.”1. Shoot During Magic HourMost notable in the picturesque big Hollywood production Days of Heaven, Malick’s insentience to shoot as many scenes as possible in fleeting dusk light might be his most notable hallmark. The shadowless glow of twilight is perfect for capturing that Malick lighting style (as well as evenly lighting your scenes).2. Wide-Angle HandheldAfter Days of Heaven, Malick disappeared from cinema for 20 years. Once he returned, he completely abandoned many of the traditional Hollywood styles in which he was forced to work early in his career. The set two-shots and conversational cut-betweens seen in most narrative formats were eliminated in favor of a wandering wide-angle camera that constantly circles around subjects as they wander through the film.3. Close-Ups of HandsIf there is a Terrence Malick “shot” that has been most pastiched and reused, it would have to be the close-up of a hand being held out and lightly touching flowing blades of grass or wheat. You can see the same shot in pretty much every one of Malick’s films, as well as appropriated in shots from The Assassination of Jesse James and Marie Antoinette.4. Cutaway Inserts of NatureThis is a style that stems back to his first feature, Badlands. Whether it’s simply light through tree branches, snakes sliding across grass or buffalo gawking at Richard Gere, Malick seemingly has never passed up any opportunity to break from filming movie stars to shoot scenic inserts of nature in its beauty.5. Whispering Existential NothingsAll the Malick footage in the world would be for naught if it didn’t include characters from the filming whispering existential non-sequiturs to no one in particular. Bonus points if the actor or actress whispering is being subjectively circled while lightly touching a tree branch in a friscilating dusk.If you’d like to see some of Malick’s influences firsthand, here’s a great supercut put together by Jacob T. Swinney of Malick-style shots in non-Malick directed films. What are your thoughts on the Malick look? Have any other style examples to share? Let us know in the comments!last_img read more

Boyle’s magic and Mr Bean’s antics steal the show in a dazzling opening ceremony for the London Olympics

first_imgDanny Boyle’s totally British Olympics opening ceremony wowed the world as London welcomed its guests to the fortnight long sporting extravaganza.Each edition of the Olympics sees a more costly opening ceremony being put on show. For London, it was all about showcasing its rich history, though there were several surprise elements which one had not expected.The first item which one saw was a countryside scene where 70 sheep, 12 horses, ten chicken, ten ducks, nine geese, three cows, three sheepdogs and two goats as part of it.Then, a cricket match was played at a gentle pace, and it was refreshing to see all the competitors in white flannels and not the ugly pyjamas which one gets to see now in ODIs and the IPL.What followed after that was one superb piece after another, though the Queen’s dramatic entry was mind boggling. In the name of tradition and respect for Royalty, few dare to innovate with the Queen.However, Danny Boyle had managed to shoot a scene where the 86-year-old Queen made a spectacular appearance into the stadium in a simulated helicopter arrival with James Bond star Daniel Craig.Immediately after that, inside the stadium, the lights fell on the Queen seated inside the stadium and the applause was thunderous.Unlike Beijing, where they used Phao drums to churn the audience and burst the eardrums, to be followed by dazzling laser shows, London’s show was milder.For those used to seeing Rowan Atkinson as Mr Bean on television shows, his presence in the British Orchestra’s rendition of the theme Chariots of Fire was hilarious. The faces he made and kept striking the piano with one finger had the audience glued! At one point of time, Mr Bean went to pick up a tissue to clean his nose, so he used an umbrella to keep striking the chord.A section then told the story of a young couple meeting for the first time and enjoying a night out. It was entitled Frankie And June Say Thanks Tim.With passage of time, their relationship developed and culminated in the use of social media and a party at her parents’ home. Waiting indoors for them was world wide web pioneer Sir Tim Berners-Lee.Before this, as promised, David Beckham made a dramatic appearance as he carried the Olympic torch down the Thames in a speed boat. Fireworks exploded over Tower Bridge as his boat cut through the water.Once he reached near the stadium, the torch was handed over to seven-time Olympic gold medalist Steve Redgrave. Redgrave ran a full lap and then it was time for Olympians from the past – long jumper Lynn Davies, swimmer Duncan Goodhew, middle distance runner Kelly Holmes, pentathlete Dame Mary Peters, sailor Shirley Robertson and decathlete Daley Thompson to join.These athletes then passed on the torch to seven young British hopes for the future Games. They lit fires in tiny copper petals left on the ground by each competing country, triggering the illumination of almost 204 petals and sending the fire into one “flame of unity.”In previous editions of the Olympics, the Games flame would be lit by just one athlete. In terms of Olympic innovation, what London has done is unique where they have not displeased any of their former champion and also involved each participating nation. As the three hour and forty five minute show was enacted, flash bulbs kept popping and the songs belted out took you down memory lane.From Bee Gees to Beatles and more old groups, each number had the audience in raptures. Finally, when Sir Paul McCartney sang ‘Hey Jude’ to bring the show to a close, it left people with moist eyes.As Jacques Rogge, president, International Olympic committee, and Lord Seb Coe, chairman, London organising committee (LOCOG)  had said, it was unique that the same city was hosting the Olympics for a third time.Later, the riot of colours and fireworks which lit up the sky was breathtaking. For those not so familiar with British tradition and the importance of the Royalty, this was a night to sample it all.advertisementlast_img read more

Finals first-timer Terrence Romeo ‘serious’ about mulling retirement if Beermen win title

first_imgRomeo said he’s “serious” about contemplating early retirement if he wins his maiden championship as a key member of the Beermen.The 27-year-old Romeo has won a handful accolades throughout his career but not one of those is a championship.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsAt least not yet with San Miguel Beer taking on Magnolia in the All-Filipino finals for the second straight year beginning Wednesday. The Beermen needed only five games to dispose of the Hotshots in last year’s Philippine Cup finals despite not having Romeo and Fil-German big Christian Standhardinger back then.“Ayun, excited pero syempre hindi ko naman pwedeng isipin lang yun palagi eh. Syempre kailangan pa rin namin maglaro ng yun nga, game, kumbaga best-of-seven so hindi pupwedeng champion na kaagad,” Romeo told reporters during the 2019 Philippine Cup Finals press conference at Eastwood in Libis. MANILA, Philippines—Terrence Romeo’s first PBA finals could be also be his last if San Miguel Beer ends up winning the Philippine Cup title for the fifth consecutive time.ADVERTISEMENT Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid (Of course I’m excited to have a chance at winning my first championship but I can’t just think about that every time. I still need to play the game and it’s a best-of-seven series, we can’t win it right away.)“Kumbaga, one game at a time tapos kung makukuha namin yun, kahit papaano nakuha ko na yung pinakakulang para sakin. I mean, kulang na award para sa sarili ko. Tapos yun, baka magretire na ko after. Hindi na ako magbabasketbol, retire na pag nag-champion kami. Isang championship lang.”(We need to approach it one game at a time and if we get it, that would the only thing that’s missing in my career and I guess I can retire after and not play basketball if we win just one championship.)San Miguel guard Terrence Romeo. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRomeo, who is only in his first conference with the Beermen, said winning a championship is his ultimate dream, which something he has to get a taste of even in his varsity days.“Pag-iisipan ko pa, pag-iisipan ko pa kasi yun lang talaga yung pinaka-dream ko eh, mag-champion sa PBA kasi wala nga akong championship simula college days ko, high school days tapos nagchachampion ako kumbaga sa barangay lang,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT (I’m still thinking about it because winning a PBA championship is my only dream because I never won a championship ever since my high school days.)SMB head coach Leo Austria said he had already known about Romeo’s plan of possibly retiring after winning a title the moment he joined the Beermen via trade four months ago.But assuming San Miguel wins the title, Austria doesn’t think Romeo will call it quits.“Players who don’t even have a chance of cracking a lineup keep on playing. It’s tough for players to let their careers go even if they don’t have a chance what more with the likes of Terrence who has yet to reach his full potential. He still has a lot more to show,” Austria said. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES View comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess SEA Games hosting troubles anger Dutertecenter_img ‘Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance PLAY LIST 01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance00:50Trending Articles02:31Duterte had wanted Albayalde to take terminal leave — Go02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Scratch from stray cat affects Des Cheng’s play in loss to FEU DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more