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Onboarding during COVID: New hires grapple with office politics from home

first_imgOne young trader hired by a major European bank as the British lockdown began said remote working had made corporate culture even tougher to navigate.”It’s not exactly easy for your new boss to explain the specifics of office politics to you without putting their foot in it,” she said, declining to be named due to company policy.”It does feel like it’s taking longer to feel loyalty to my new employer than it might have otherwise. I feel loyal to the team but not to the wider bank.”A new joiner at a different, London-based bank said his interviewers had appeared to study his bookshelves and photos while asking questions, and that he does not expect to meet his colleagues in person until next year, although he joined in May. For Sam Thompson, who joined money saving and investment app MoneyBox, a lack of face-to-face contact did make some early interactions with colleagues feel more transactional. But he appreciated the lengths the company has gone to to make it work.”We’ve been getting Deliveroo vouchers and we’ve been sitting around our computers while talking to one another and having lunch,” he said. “It’s probably the best induction into a company that I’ve ever had,” said the Quality Assurance Engineer, who has had several jobs in six years in the industry.Founded in 2016, MoneyBox has taken on 35 new hires during the lockdown to a total headcount of 135. It initially held off from filling roles requiring interaction with multiple teams, such as developers, Jack Johnstone, head of HR and talent, said, but overcame those fears.Its approach mirrors those of major banks including Standard Chartered, Citi and Deutsche Bank, which have all rapidly redesigned their interview and orientation process.Citi hired around 3,840 new staff in its Institutional Clients Group Operations & Technology between March and August.Once a new hire is appointed, MoneyBox and the banks send out a joining manual or welcoming video along with the required technology.Virtual face-to-face meetings are held much more regularly with managers, buddy partners are formed with existing staff and an array of tech platforms are used to maintain communication.Meetings with different teams and online social events are encouraged to help staff build broader networks and replicate the ‘chance meetings’ they may have had in canteens and lifts.Drinks anyone?Andy Halford, chief financial officer of Standard Chartered, told Reuters online drinks and other social events were vital.”Some people find it easier to talk and connect when they are not ‘at work’,” he said. “We want to humanize this situation for everyone.”Professor Nicholas Bloom at Stanford University said new hires unable to meet colleagues in person would struggle with unspoken rules – from how many hours people really work to when to take a break and what to wear.For graduates, who often work long hours when joining banks or big law firms, that poses another risk. “At home it generates a strong incentive for over-communication, so endlessly sending unnecessary emails and slack messages just to highlight the fact that you’re still there,” Bloom said.Still, McKinsey Partner Alexander DiLeonardo said new hires have to work harder to network. “When you aren’t sitting next to your new colleagues or outside your supervisor’s office, you have to be intentional about reaching out,” he said. Topics :center_img Joining a new company can be tough at the best of times, with bosses to impress, skills to learn and new colleagues to befriend.But that task becomes a whole lot harder when the “onboarding” is done during a pandemic that has forced millions to work from home, leaving new hires to judge colleagues on their taste in curtains and conduct on Zoom.The companies that get it right should have an expanded, grateful workforce, but get it wrong and new hires could find it hard to develop team spirit or a sense of belonging to the firm.last_img read more

Home-based Eagles to Earn $400,000 as CHAN 2018 Runner-up Prize

first_imgOlawale Ajimotokan in AbujaThe Confederation of African Football (CAF) has officially released the cash entitlements of all teams that participated at the 5th African Nations Championship in Morocco, with second-placed Nigeria to earn the sum of $400,000 and not $750,000 as widely touted.The figure is the same amount paid out to the runner-up of the last edition of the competition in Rwanda. It was initially expected that CAF was going to upgrade the prize money of CHAN 2018 to reflect the new sponsor just the way the winner of AFCON 2017, Cameroon was paid upgraded to $4million instead of the previous $1.5million.NFF President Amaju Pinnick, who is also a member of both the CAF Executive Committee and the CAF Emergency Committee, made the clarifications wednesday barely 24 hours after the Home-based Eagles arrived the country from Morocco with the runner-up trophy.“Official figures have now shown that hosts and champions Morocco will pocket the sum of $750,000, with silver medallists Nigeria to earn $400,000 and semi finalists Sudan (eventual bronze medallists) and Libya to pocket the sum of $250,000 each.“The four teams that crashed out at the quarter final stage, viz Namibia, Zambia, Angola and Congo will each be $175,000 richer, while the third placed teams in each of the four preliminary groups will get $125,000 each.“The fourth-placed teams in each of the four groups will smile to the bank with $100,000.“CAF has spread the monies in such a way that each of the 16 participating teams at the finals would benefit. No team has received its share yet, but once the finance and audit people conclude their work in a number of weeks, the teams would be paid,” Pinnick told the NFF website.Super Eagles’ players and officials, who have been promised 30 per cent of the bonus by the NFF will be smiling to the bank in a few weeks’ time when they get the cash from CAF.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

David Ortiz’s condition upgraded to ‘good;’ prosecutors set to reveal motive, plot behind shooting

first_img“We remain grateful to everyone who has helped David through this ordeal, both in the Dominican Republic and here in Boston. David’s journey to good health has been bolstered by the many expressions of love that have come to us from across the globe. Your support has lifted his spirits tremendously during this challenging time.”The #RedSox today issued the following statement on behalf of Tiffany Ortiz: pic.twitter.com/WRTQJD9KLq— Boston Red Sox (@RedSox) June 18, 2019The retired Red Sox star had been listed in “guarded” condition in recent days. He underwent surgery in the Dominican Republic following the shooting, and doctors removed his gallbladder and part of his intestines. He was then transported to Boston. David Ortiz’s condition has been upgraded to “good,” his wife Tiffany reported Wednesday, nine days after he was shot in his native Dominican Republic.“This morning, David’s condition was upgraded to ‘good’ by his doctors and he continues to make progress with his recovery in the intensive care unit at Massachusetts General Hospital,” Tiffany Ortiz said in a statement released by the Red Sox. The 43-year-old Ortiz was at a Santo Domingo bar the night of June 9 when a suspect shot him at close range. Thus far, 11 people have been taken into custody in connection with the shooting. Boston’s WCVB TV reports that prosecutors are expected to reveal the motive and plot behind the shooting Wednesday.Ortiz, affectionately known as “Big Papi,” was a 10-time All-Star who led the Red Sox to three World Series titles.last_img read more

This minor league brawl led to felony charges, remains one of baseball’s craziest fights

first_imgThe incident marked one of YouTube’s earliest viral moments, with an array of low-definition postings receiving millions of combined views. It received national attention and appeared on ESPN’s SportsCenter later that week.MORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZNCastillo never pitched another inning in the U.S. and returned to the Dominican Republic when his work visa was revoked. He was 20 at the time and did not know how to read or write, according to the Dayton Daily News.Castillo said he intended his throw to keep the Dayton bench from charging the field, though it had the opposite effect.“I threw the ball in front of the dugout, because I was nervous and I was frightened,” Castillo told the News through an interpreter. “I didn’t throw it to hit anyone.” In all, 15 players were ejected from the ensuing fracas. Almost everyone was asked to return to the field, however, so each team could finish the game. Two notable future MLB players were among those initially dismissed: Devin Mesoraco and Brandon Guyer.Additionally, current Angels infielder Zack Cosart, then with Dayton, was hit by a pitch in the first inning and left due to injury. His beaning is what escalated tension in the first frame. A hard slide a couple of plays later — and a baseball flying toward the dugout — put emotions over the top.As for the broken leg? It came between Cosart’s hit-by-pitch and the brawl when Peoria teammates collided trying to cover second base, sending infielder Gian Guzman off on a stretcher. Guzman would never play in the field again. He spent one season as a pitcher before finishing his U.S. professional career at 20 years old. The broken leg was not what resulted in the felony assault charge. It was not the multiple cranium-seeking pitches, either.On June 24, 2008, Class-A Peoria pitcher Julio Castillo’s errant, mid-brawl hurl of a baseball toward the Dayton dugout, which struck a fan in the crowd, prompted law enforcement to make a postgame arrest. Castillo wound up being convicted of felonious assault causing serious physical injury and sentenced to 30 days in jail after the fan was diagnosed with a concussion.last_img read more