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Indonesia to build ‘Indonesian Village’ during Tokyo Olympics to support 2032 bid

first_imgIndonesia’s National Olympic Committee (NOC) has submitted a budget plan to the government for the construction of an Indonesian Village, also called the House of Indonesia, in Tokyo in an effort to garner support for its bid to host the 2032 Olympics.The village will be built on a 1,500-square-meter plot of land close to the athlete’s village in Harumi, Chou-ku, Tokyo, during this year’s Summer Olympics, scheduled to begin on July 24 and end on Aug. 9.“We need a budget of around Rp 200 billion [US$14 million] to build the infrastructure,” NOC chairperson Raja Sapta Oktohari said on Tuesday. Topics : He added that the figure was a rough estimate because the NOC still had to meet with relevant stakeholders to discuss the plan. The committee, however, had completed the Indonesian Village’s design, he went on to say.“The location for the village is strategic as it will be located next to Nike’s [booth in the athlete’s village]. We are waiting for the government to disburse its funding to start the construction,” said Okto.Read also: Indonesia to build world-class training facility for 2032 Olympics, NOC saysThe committee is planning to hold a meeting in the coming week with relevant stakeholders regarding the Indonesian Village, including President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, so the installation will finish in time for the 2020 Olympics.center_img Although the Olympics is five months away, Okto said he was not worried and remained optimistic that the House of Indonesia construction would be complete by May.“The construction will be quick, taking only two months. The only difficulty is regarding the permit. However, we will finish by May. We will make it as concise and effective as possible,” said Okto.The House of Indonesia will serve as one of the promotional steps taken by the government in its bid to host the 2032 Olympics.Indonesian Ambassador to Switzerland Muliaman Hadad submitted a formal bid letter from Jokowi to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lausanne in February last year. The government said hosting the 2032 summer games could be an opportunity for Indonesia to show its capability as a major country. (rdi)last_img read more

Migrants, police in fresh clashes at Turkey-Greece border

first_imgTopics :  ‘Coordinated attacks’Earlier Friday, Greek officials accused Turkey of providing cutters to migrants to break through fencing. “There are coordinated attacks this morning,” a Greek official told AFP. “Apart from intimidation, these attacks are taking place from the Turkish police to help migrants cross the fence border line.”Meanwhile, two Greek men were convicted of threatening aid workers on the island of Lesbos, where there has been a violent backlash against those helping the swelling number of arrivals.”I will continue to defend my country. Most of the (aid groups) operate like spies. These gangsters should leave the island,” said 73-year-old Konstantinos Alvanopoulos after being given a three-month suspended sentence.Erdogan’s office said the Syrian ceasefire would not alter its policy on refugees leaving for Europe. “The Russia-Turkey agreement does not… change the fact of the European Union’s non-compliance with its promises as part of the 2016 refugee deal,” presidential sources told state news agency Anadolu. Russia, which backs Syrian government forces with air power, agreed to impose a ceasefire in Idlib from midnight and the skies were free of warplanes for the first day in months on Friday, although previous peace agreements have proved temporary. The EU welcomed the ceasefire. “For sure I am pleased for the ceasefire, the ceasefire is good news. At least it’s goodwill — let’s see how it works,” Borrell said in Zagreb.”But there’s still an extraordinary humanitarian challenge that I think we all face in terms of the sheer numbers of refugees,” added Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney. “Right now, let’s be honest, the agreement is dead,” Mitsotakis told CNN, referring to the EU-Turkey accord.”And it’s dead because Turkey has decided to completely violate the agreement, because of what happened in Syria,” he added.Turkey agreed in 2016 to stop letting migrants leave in exchange for six billion euros — but Ankara says other parts of the EU deal including improved visa and trade rules were never fulfilled. Mitsotakis said Turkey was doing “the exact opposite” of its obligation to hold back asylum-seekers. Greek police fired tear gas in clashes with migrants at the Turkish border on Friday, as Athens said a 2016 EU-Ankara deal limiting migration to Europe was “dead”.Thousands of people have gathered at the border since Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said last week that his country would no longer stop refugees from trying to leave.Greece’s Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis accused Ankara of “assisting” an ongoing surge of desperate people gathering at the border. ‘Open the gates’ Friday’s brief clashes occurred as migrants tried to break through the fence, according to AFP journalists at the scene, but they quickly ended the volley of rocks and instead sat peacefully chanting “freedom” and “open the gates”.Greek forces say they have prevented nearly 39,000 people from crossing the border. Turkey claims the real number is more than three times higher.Many migrants say they are being pushed to attempt illegal entry to Greece. “They [the Turkish military] told us that if you don’t go to the border… you will be forced to come back to Turkey and people don’t want to come back because they don’t have any good opportunities, there isn’t anything,” Ali, an Iranian, told AFP.The EU’s diplomatic chief made a direct appeal to the migrants not to go to the Greek border.”The border is not open,” EU High Representative Josep Borrell said after a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Zagreb. Turkey and Russia agreed a ceasefire in Syria on Thursday, but Ankara is still threatened by a potential new influx of refugees from the last rebel stronghold of Idlib and has sought to pressure Europe into providing greater assistance.  Turkey already hosts some four million refugees, and recent advances by the Syrian army, backed by Russian army, have pushed close to a million more towards its border. Later Friday, the Greek government released footage which it said showed Turkish riot police firing a tear gas barrage at Greek border guards.It came after the release of separate footage from Turkish state TV TRT which it said showed asylum-seekers stripped and beaten by Greek forces.A Greek police source disputed the claim, telling AFP: “We are not letting them through the border, so how can we be doing that to them?”Ankara has officially accused Athens of using undue violence against asylum-seekers, killing several and injuring many. Greek officials have repeatedly dismissed this as untrue.last_img read more

Investors must ‘move beyond talking’ on climate risk disclosure – AODP

first_imgHe added that the writing was on the wall regarding transparency, and that leaders in the field were already fully disclosing all risks associated with climate change.“It’s time to accept the inevitable and embrace this change,” Poulter said.The warning came as the UK’s Prudential Regulation Authority warned that pension funds should not underestimate their fiduciary duty to consider the financial risks of climate change.In a report aimed at the insurance industry and launched by Bank of England governor Mark Carney, it outlined lawsuits brought in the US against pension trustees for failing to consider the financial risks associated with the “structural decline” of the coal industry.In a speech at Lloyd’s of London on Tuesday, Carney referenced the US lawsuits.“Cases like Arch Coal and Peabody Energy – where it is alleged the directors of corporate pension schemes failed in their fiduciary duties by not considering financial risks driven at least in part by climate change – illustrate the potential for long-tail risks to be significant, uncertain and non-linear.“These risks will only increase as the science and evidence of climate change hardens.”The AODP and ClientEarth previously warned that pension funds falling behind on climate-risk mitigation risked breaching their fiduciary duty. Institutional investors have been urged to back the “inevitable” shift towards even greater climate-risk transparency to protect investments against climate change risks.The Asset Owners Disclosure Project (AODP) said it was time for investors to “move beyond the talking” when it came to tackling the risk associated with climate change.Its chief executive Julian Poulter added that those leading the organisation’s index on climate-risk disclosure had proven investments could be protected “against a carbon crash and still make money”.“It’s time to focus attention on those laggards who are digging their heels in – some for ideological reasons and some out of negligence,” he said. last_img read more

Palmdale district to recruit bilingual teachers in Mexico

first_imgPalmdale previously recruited teachers from Canada in the mid-1990s and Spain in 2000. The recruiting trip to Spain caused some controversy as the board split 3-2 on a vote to authorize it, with some trustees complaining that the district could find qualified bilingual teachers closer to home. At Tuesday’s board meeting, the vote was 5-0. Trustee Sheldon Epstein, who was in the minority in the 2000 vote, said he didn’t have a problem recruiting teachers in Mexico. District officials said they are looking in the United States for teachers, but can’t find the number and type of teachers they need. There is a shortage of teachers in general, especially among those with the expertise to teach math and science, officials said. “We do find qualified instructors in the U.S. We are currently recruiting in New York, the Northwest and Midwest, but they don’t typically have bilingual people in certain areas,” Gallizzi said. PALMDALE – The Palmdale School District will recruit bilingual teachers from Mexico under a program aimed at fostering mutual understanding between the U.S. and other countries. The goal is to find nine teachers who would work at Los Amigos School, where students are taught in both Spanish and English, and at the district’s junior highs in the 2007-08 school year. “We are short teachers. We are short bilingual teachers. This is one place to find them,” interim Superintendent Roger Gallizzi said. The Exchange Teacher Visitor Program is the result of a 1961 federal law that aims to increase mutual understanding between Americans and people of other countries through educational and cultural exchanges, which assist the U.S. State Department in furthering its foreign policy objectives, a district staff report said. Epstein said Palmdale is competing with other areas that have growing Latino student populations. “It’s a case of supply and demand, and the supply is low. We have to look at other options,” Epstein said. The Mexican teachers must possess the proper teaching credentials in their own country and obtain a California credential once they arrive here. They also must take a language-proficiency exam to show fluency in English and pass a basic skills test for new teachers. A worker visa also is required, Gallizzi said. The Palmdale district will help those chosen find a place to live and familiarize them with the community, said Pauline Winbush, director of certificated personnel. karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com (661) 267-5744160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more