first_imgAfter several protestsFollowing recent protest action, part-time sweeper/cleaners of public schools in Linden, Region 10 (Upper Demerara/Berbice), have welcomed a decision to have their positions regularised. Guyana Public Service Union (GPSU) Regional Representative Maurice Butters related the news to several workers, who were happy that their plight had finally been addressed by Government.Butters shared information from a circular which was sent by Permanent Secretary within the Education Ministry, Vibert Welch, dated March 8, 2018, which indicated that consequent to the review of the hours of work for sweeper/cleaners, aFlashback: Sweeper-cleaners during the protest in front of the Education Ministrydecision has been taken to regularise the employment of part-time workers employed in public schools across the 10 Regions.It stated that approval was granted for sweeper/cleaners to be paid the minimum hourly wage rate of $312 each hour they work; that they be guaranteed 12 months’ pay; that their working hours will not exceed 8 hours per day and five days per week, and that they will be allowed to work at least 20 days per month for the entire calendar year.The sweepers/cleaners will be granted at least 12 working days annually as paid annual leave, which will be utilized during school breaks. Prior to the decision, the sweeper/cleaners were paid $24,740 monthly, and worked four to six hours per day.Butters said while he is happy with the decision, the circular is vague and does not specify when or how the system of regularisation will be implemented. He stressed that there has been no word on same from the Region 10 Democratic Council (RDC), although he personally delivered the circular to the office since Saturday last. Butters said despite several attempts, he was unsuccessful in getting word from the Regional administration as to the way forward, as he stressed that new employment letters are now necessary for the workers, in moving forward. The employees also indicated that they wished for all these to be sorted out before the start of the new term, as Butters emphasized that he will continue to press for a meeting with the regional administration.Sweeper/cleaners from Linden and Georgetown have been protesting Government for better wages since last year. The workers went as far as staging a protest at the Ministry of the Presidency, Finance Ministry and the Education’ Ministry’s Department of Culture Youth and Sport, demanding that their cries be heard.last_img read more

first_imgST. LOUIS, Mo. – Senior Taryn Rolle (Nassau, The Bahamas) of the Drake University track and field team has been selected Missouri Valley Conference Scholar-Athlete of the Week presented by Enterprise Bank and Trust Company, MVC Commissioner Doug Elgin announced Wednesday, April 18. Rolle was honored for her performance from April 9-15. Rolle’s honor brings the Bulldogs total up to 24 Scholar-Athlete of the Week honors this season, the most of any Valley program. 2017-18 Drake Missouri Valley Scholar-Athletes of the WeekSept. 6 – Josh Yeager – Men’s Cross CountrySept. 13 – Kyle Brandt – Men’s Cross CountryOct. 4 – Kyla Inderski – VolleyballNov. 28 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballNov. 28 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 6 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballDec. 6 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 13 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Nick McGlynn, Men’s BasketballJan. 10 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 10 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballJan. 17 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballJan. 17 – Nick McGlynn, Men’s BasketballJan. 31 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballFeb. 7 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballFeb. 7 – Maddy Dean, Women’s BasketballFeb. 14 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballMarch 1 – Reed Timmer, Women’s BasketballMarch 7 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballMarch 14 – Maddy Dean, Women’s BasketballMarch 21 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballApril 4 – Taryn Pena, SoftballApril 18 – Taryn Rolle, Track and Field Print Friendly Versioncenter_img Rolle shattered a Drake school record last weekend with a jump of 41-8.5 (12.71m) in the triple jump at the Jim Duncan Invitational. The effort bested the field by more than six feet to win the event and the mark is the best this season in The Valley by more than seven inches. Rolle’s performance also ranks in the top 40 nationally. Additionally, Rolle ran a leg on the winning 4×100 meter relay that finished with a time of 47.23. Rolle is a senior majoring in marketing and public relations and holds a 3.79 GPA.last_img read more

first_imgA young woman who stole two North Face jackets from McElhinney’s Stores in Ballybofey has been given the Probation Act. Sinead Browne appeared at Letterkenny District Court today charged with theft from the store in Ballybofey on May 5th, 2016. The court heard the 27-year-old woman entered the store, took the blue and black North Face jackets, valued at €280 in total, and left without paying.Security personnel at the store contacted the Gardai and having viewed CCTV footage, Ms Browne was tracked own and admitted to the offences.Neither of the jackets were ever recovered.The court was told that Ms Browne, of Milltown Court, Kilmacrennan, was a full-time carer for her partner.Judge Paul Kelly said he was told at a previous court sitting that Ms Browne may be able to compensate the store.However, the woman’s solicitor said she was surviving on her carer’s allowance and was not in a position to come up with any compensation.Judge Paul Kelly said that in the circumstances he would give Ms Browne the benefit of the Probation Act.Woman pleads guilty to stealing North Face jackets from McElhinneys was last modified: September 10th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtdonegaljacketMCELHINNEYSNorth Facetheftlast_img read more

first_imgIf the brain evolved, wouldn’t anything the mind does be determined by forces beyond one’s control?Choose to disbelieve in determinism: “Humans are wired for prejudice but that doesn’t have to be the end of the story,” Caitlin Millett writes in The Conversation.  A neuroscientist doctoral candidate at Penn State, Millett begins by telling her readers that their brains evolved:Humans are highly social creatures. Our brains have evolved to allow us to survive and thrive in complex social environments. Accordingly, the behaviors and emotions that help us navigate our social sphere are entrenched in networks of neurons within our brains.Yet at the end of her article, she preaches that we need to overcome our evolution by the power of free will:In today’s world people are more connected than ever – from social media to Skype, to the never-ending news cycle – people are exposed to increasing diversity. Due to these advances, we as a global community are also faced with the knowledge that prejudice-based discrimination and violence still exist. It’s become a human imperative to transcend divisive impulses which no longer serve our survival. Neuroscience has started to educate us about innate human drives. It’s now up to all of us how to use this information.This implies that we have an imperative (a command) to fight our evolution, and choose how to use the information that evolutionary neuroscience has revealed. Does it make sense to fight one’s own evolution? How does a being under the power of natural selection transcend one’s impulses?Fight your bias: Conservatives might be glad to finally find one admission that bias applies to both sides of the political aisle, but Science Daily assumes everyone is capable of recognizing their bias and overcoming it. “Demonizing whole groups of people, saying that they are inherently incapable of understanding science, is not only false, it is not an effective communication strategy,” R. Kelly Garrett, a communications professor at Ohio State, said. “Everyone can be biased. Calling people names is not a solution.” This indicates how differently professors in the humanities and the sciences can view the mind, responsibility, and free will.Convince, don’t fight: Along the same lines, Bliuc and McGarty in The Conversation advise global-warming believers (like themselves) not to bash global-warming skeptics.  Their headline, “Overcoming the social barriers to climate consensus,” reveals that they support the human-caused global warming position. Yet the authors preach peace. “It can be tempting to think that people who disagree with you are mad, bad or simply stupid,” they say. “However, not only are such judgements usually wrong, but telling people that they are stupid is unlikely to convince them of the merit of your own view.” Their emphasis on social solutions to the political divide presupposes free will.The downside of political coercion: The bitter fruit of treating a populace like robots to be manipulated can be seen in China’s backtracking on their decades-long “one-child policy.” Seeing that they have created a gender imbalance that threatens social unrest and other unintended consequences, they are now attempting to fix it by mandating a “two-child policy.” But it’s generating more unrest, Medical Xpress reports. A whole generation has grown up looking down on parents with more than one child, and seeing them severely punished; can they switch gears so easily? Outsiders are warning the leaders that a two-child policy cannot be forced on Chinese parents. In an op-ed for a leading Communist Party newspaper, Liu Zhun advised, “It is better to carry forward the new policy through encouragement and incentives, which will be more easily accepted by the people.”That last story is tragic, but it illustrates the stark contrast between an evolution-based communist society and a creation-based free society. Communists built their system on Darwinian biology. Accordingly, they treated their people as animals to be manipulated. The document that launched America’s free society rests its propositions on the self-evident truth that we are endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights. Rights imply responsibilities, and responsibilities imply free will. A government that mandates a “one-child policy” runs roughshod over the rights of their people; is anyone surprised when “unintended consequences” follow?John Stossel’s weekly TV program this week focuses on the differences between communism and capitalism. Stossel, a libertarian who believes in evolution, nevertheless argues for freedom on pragmatic grounds; freedom is good because it works. Government coercion brings waste, low quality and suffering. This shows that he really doesn’t believe in evolution; else why create a show trying to convince people to think and use reason?All of these articles presuppose free will. If they didn’t why would a neuroscientist choose to write about the brain and tell readers how they should overcome prejudice? Why would  supporters of a political persuasion choose to write about how to convince (not coerce or manipulate) others of the correctness of their views? Why should a communist write an op-ed to encourage leaders to switch from mandates to incentives?These articles show that determinism is self-refuting. We all know our own consciousness. We all know the influences that tempt us, but understand that we have the freedom to choose against temptation and do the right thing.(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgLocal athletes can now differentiate between banned and unbanned substances, thanks to a new mobile phone app. (Image: Sports and Recreation) Athletes without iPhones can access information through a mobisite. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Khalid Galant CEO Institute for Drug Free Sport +27 21 761 8034  RELATED ARTICLES • Drive to stamp out doping in SA sport • Lean times for drug traffickers • Mobile technology for Africa • Top medical team for 2010Bongani NkosiA new mobile phone application is making it easier for South African athletes to differentiate between banned and unbanned substances in sport.The South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) has announced the new mobisite and an innovative iPhone app, which brings sportsmen and -women the most up-to-date drug information.It’s aimed at ensuring the country’s athletes avoid using banned substances unwittingly.“The app will benefit our athletes. They can download the app for free and get quick access to the list of banned and permitted substances in sport,” said SAIDS CEO Khalid Galant.“Now they can check the status of medication anytime, anywhere and can see, at the touch of a button, which drugs are approved and which ones are banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency,” Galant added.More than 5 000 professional athletes will benefit from the educational initiative, as well as scores of up-and-coming amateurs.Doctors are advised to use the app to access the latest information on banned drugs, as negligent subscription may risk athletes’ careers.“Medical doctors who treat athletes will be able to use the app to ascertain whether the drugs they wish to prescribe to their patients are banned or permitted,” said Gallant.The initiative is about making anti-doping education material “accessible to an even wider audience”, SAIDS said.The institute launched a major campaign to raise awareness about illegal performance-enhancing substances in June 2011. The “I Play Fair, Say No to Doping” drive aims to curb doping among local athletes.The Cape Town-based public organisation conceded that a number of athletes in the country were inadvertently taking banned drugs. The doping problem was compounded by lack of broad knowledge on banned supplements in local athletics, SAIDS said. The mobisite will come in handy for athletes who do not have iPhones. “Those who don’t have iPhones can access the info via the new Drug-Free Sport mobisite,” said Galant.“We will monitor how these audiences utilise the tool and will look at extending the app to include Blackberry and Android in the future.”Liability for banned substances Athletes have been urged to be more cautious when taking any form of supplement, as the individual bears the brunt for doping. Testing positive for anabolic steroids could lead to at least two years banned from sport.“For athletes concerned with testing positive as the result of taking prescribed medications, it is important for them to understand that strict liability applies, and that if they choose to take banned substances, they do so at their own risk.”SAIDS wants the government to introduce regulation policies for the supplements manufacturing and distribution sector, which it believes it was infiltrated by unscrupulous dealers. It blames the lack of regulation for the prevalence of banned drugs like anabolic and prohormones stimulants in athletics.The organisation is determined to root out general accessibility to banned steroids. It recently launched an intelligence unit that investigates syndicates selling illegal performance-enhancing drugs.Innovative international trendThe SAIDS app follows latest international trends, and the organisation prides itself in being one of the earliest agencies to adopt it.Swiss and German anti-doping agencies also launched their versions of the mobile phone application in August 2011. “We are the third anti-doping agency worldwide to do one,” according to Gallant.last_img read more

first_imgThe annual event, proudly sponsored by Club partner Totally Wicked, will be held on Tuesday 17 September (6:45pm Arrival for Dinner at 7:30pm.)You are invited to join us for this special occasion to celebrate our 2019 League and Cup campaign. The evening will be hosted by MC Pete Emmett will take place at the Totally Wicked Stadium and you can be part of it.Tickets for the event are strictly limited and priced at £40 for 2019 Members and £48 for non-members.Book your place now at saintssuperstore.com – Hospitality & Events, or you can email us to book or enquire at: helen.emanuel@saintsrlfc.com or call us on 01744 455053.Please note the dress code for this event it smart casual with no replica shirts.last_img read more