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Biopharmaceutical Research

first_imgThe University of Georgia is partnering in a biopharmaceutical innovation institute that aims to boost market production of cell-based therapies and develop a skilled workforce to work in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry.The new public-private partnership, called the National Institute for Innovation of Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL) will focus its efforts on driving down the cost and risks associated with manufacturing advanced cell and gene therapies for biopharmaceutical production.Steven Stice, director of the UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and D.W. Brooks Distinguished Professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is the UGA lead in the partnership, which is coordinated by the University of Delaware.NIIMBL represents a total investment of $250 million, including $129 million in private cost-share commitments from the NIIMBL consortium of 150 companies, nonprofits, educational institutions and state partners across the country, combined with at least $70 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce.NIIMBL is the 11th institute under the Manufacturing USA National Network for Manufacturing Innovation initiative created to advance manufacturing leadership and restore jobs to the U.S.This recent success follows an announcement in 2016 by the U.S. Department of Defense that an MIT-led team involving UGA was selected for funding as the eighth NNMI institute.“We are pleased to have UGA participate in these high-profile public-private partnerships that are aimed at advancing U.S. leadership in key manufacturing sectors,” said UGA Vice President for Research David Lee. “We are eager to assist industry partners in meeting their goals through the development of new and existing intellectual property, and the training of an appropriate workforce.”Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly showing promising results in treating some of the most prevalent and debilitating diseases affecting human health. But manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals is not without large-scale operational and technological challenges, Stice said.These biologically sourced drugs are different from traditional small molecule, synthesized drugs. For example, he said, the synthesized drug ibuprofen can be precisely copied and characterized, and result in varied generic versions. In contrast, biopharmaceuticals like vaccines are much more complex and rely on the use of a biological transformation. As living cells, they are highly sensitive to their conditions and surroundings.Technical projects, which will be designed by the industry partners of the institution, will be selected through a competitive process and funded via subaward agreements with NIIMBL members.Stice, a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, will facilitate team assembly for response to the project calls, leveraging years of collective experience in regenerative medicine and technology development. He is also co-director of the Regenerative Engineering and Medicine research center, or REM, a collaboration by Emory University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and UGA. “There is a crippling regulatory gap, which is commonly referred to as ‘the valley of death’ in moving biotech products from discovery to commercialization,” Stice said. “What NIIMBL presents is an opportunity to help improve government regulation, minimize failure, create job growth and improve health care quality, all while reducing costs in the U.S.”For more information about the role UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center plays in developing biotechnology that will shape the future visit www.rbc.uga.edu.last_img read more

Brunch at the Harbor

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisHARRISVILLE, Mich.— The taste of all things local was the main idea of the Harrisville event. Farm to Fork in Alcona and Taste the Local Difference served up brunch using all local ingredients. Michiganders enjoyed a hot meal while giving back to the community.Forty-nine percent of the food sourced from the event came from Northern Michigan farms. Both organizations not only promote local sourced foods, but zero waste and more recycling.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Cruise In car showNext Farm Day at the Ranchlast_img read more

Africa Cup of Nations 2017: Riot stops play in qualifier

first_imgA riot stopped play in an Africa Cup of Nations qualifier on Sunday as fans threw missiles and police fired tear gas into the stands.The unrest broke out when a goal was awarded to Guinea Bissau after 81 minutes, with Kenya’s players arguing the ball had not crossed the line.Play was halted for 30 minutes as Kenya fans threw missiles at the Guinea Bissau bench and the fourth official.Kenya, who were beaten 1-0 in Nairobi, could face sanctions.The result takes Guinea Bissau to the top of their qualifying group and leaves Kenya with little chance of qualifying for next year’s tournament.Elsewhere in Group E, Congo and Zambia drew 1-1 in an identical scoreline to their result in Ndola on Wednesday. Jordan Massengo put Congo ahead in Brazzaville just after half-time, with Winston Kalengo equalising in the 72nd minute.Guinea Bissau lead the group on seven points, one point ahead of both Congo and Zambia, with Kenya bottom, six points off the top.In Sunday’s first Nations Cup qualifier, Ghana lost their 100% record in Group H with a 0-0 draw in Mozambique.The result in Maputo leaves the Black Stars on 10 points, four ahead of Mauritius, the surprise package in Group H. Mauritius could close that gap with a win over Rwanda in Kigali on Tuesday.West Bromwich Albion’s Stephane Sessegnon scored twice for Benin in Cotonou as the hosts beat South Sudan 4-1 to go top of Group C. Mickael Pote and Jodel Dossou were also on target for Benin, with Atak Lual grabbing a consolation for the away side.Mali could regain the lead in that group if they beat Equatorial Guinea in Malabo on Monday.Comoros, who got their first win in a major qualifying competition when they beat Botswana at home on Thursday, were brought back down to earth with a 2-1 defeat in the return fixture.Comoros looked like they might complete a double over their opponents when Mchangama Youssouf scored just before the break.But second-half goals from Galabgwe Moyana and then Joel Mogorosi gave Botswana the win which puts them level on points with the top two, Uganda and Burkina Faso, who play each other in Kampala on Tuesday. All group winners are guaranteed places at the 2017 tournament in Gabon, with the best two runners-up joining them. –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoySportsGH. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more