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Lawmakers grill religious affairs minister for ‘sudden’ haj cancellation

first_imgReligious Affairs Minister Fachrul Razi found himself in hot water during a hearing with the House of Representatives on Thursday, as lawmakers on Commission VIII overseeing religious affairs criticized him for not consulting with the House before deciding to cancel the 2020 haj pilgrimage over coronavirus concerns.The minister announced earlier this month that Indonesia would prevent haj departures to Saudi Arabia this year, a decision that affected hundreds of thousands of would-be pilgrims in the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation. Indonesia has the largest haj pilgrim quota of any country. John Kennedy Azis of the Golkar Party – a political party in President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s ruling coalition – questioned Fachrul’s sudden announcement of the policy on June 2, saying there had been no pressure for the central government to announce it immediately without consulting the legislative body.”There was no external pressure that we would be fined if we didn’t decide [on haj departures] quickly. Why couldn’t you wait for just two days? Why so sudden?” John said, referring to a planned House hearing with the government on the matter scheduled for June 4.The COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with Saudi Arabia’s indefinite suspension of haj and umrah (minor haj), were cited as reasons behind the government’s decision to cancel this year’s haj departure. Fachrul previously said the conditions had left the government without enough time to prepare visas and protective measures.Indonesia initially planned to send about 221,000 people on the annual pilgrimage, and nearly 180,000 people had already paid for the journey, Religious Affairs Ministry data shows. The government said the pilgrims would be placed on next year’s haj. Read also: Religious affairs minister to lobby Saudi Arabian government for bigger 2021 haj quotaFachrul said at the time of the cancellation that he had communicated with the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI) and the House regarding the cancellation, but some lawmakers quickly fired back, saying he had not done so.John said to Fachrul – a retired military general – that he had made numerous controversial moves as a minister.The politician cited his past controversial support of a ban on the niqab in government compounds – a statement that Fachrul later backtracked from – and his past announcement of a plan to repatriate 689 people who had joined the Islamic State (IS) movement in the Middle East.He warned Fachrul that the House could use its interpellation and inquiry rights against him or could write a letter to the President if he continued his controversies. “Don’t underestimate us at the House […] This should be the last [controversial move].”John also highlighted a plan floated by Aceh to get their own, separate haj quota. The provincial administration was reportedly considering issuing a qanun (regulation) on the matter based on Law No. 44/1999 on Aceh’s special autonomy.”Regions are trying to apply for haj quotas themselves. If that happens, then where’s the government?” he said.Read also: Plan to ban niqab in government offices stirs controversyMuhammad Husni of the Gerindra Party said Fachrul had violated Law No. 8/2019 on the haj and umrah, which stipulated that matters related to haj funds should not be decided unilaterally by the government but should include the House.”Logically speaking, we should decide on the cancellation together. The Minister said that he had coordinated with House Commission VIII but we never knew that,” Husni said.In response to the criticism, Fachrul apologized to the lawmakers during Thursday’s hearing, saying the cancellation decision was not made by his ministry but by himself as a minister.”I personally apologize to the leaders and all members of the House Commission VIII for this incident,” said Fachrul.The minister explained that at that time, he felt obliged to announce the cancellation as soon as possible because it had exceeded the June 1 deadline for the government to announce the year’s haj departure date.Indonesia initially expected Saudi Arabia to announce its final decision on the haj pilgrimage – which attracts millions of Muslims annually from around the world – on May 13. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has plunged the 2020 haj into doubt as Saudi authorities have yet to announce any decision about whether they will accept haj pilgrims this year.”We needed to quickly give certainty to the pilgrims who had been waiting for the announcement,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

Provost creates task force to reconsider campus symbols

first_imgMany students and organizations have called on the University to change the name of Von KleinSmid Center — a building named after USC’s fifth president, Rufus B. Von KleinSmid, an active member of the eugenics movement who advocated for forced sterilization practices. “Last spring, USG passed a resolution about changing the name of [Von KleinSmid Center] and in conjunction with that over the summer, myself and Emmett wrote a resolution that the GSG executive board put out about … the history of racism on campus,” said Quinn Anex-Ries, GSG’s director of diversity and equity advocacy. “[We] both worked together to result in the creation of the University Task Force.” “This has been part of a national movement … for a number of institutions like ourselves, including Michigan, Yale, Princeton, Harvard and Stanford,” Carry told the Daily Trojan. “They have done exactly what we are getting ready to do … through whatever [ways] it came to their attention … so University’s had to create a process to interrogate this.” Provost Michael Quick announced the creation of a Task Force on University Nomenclature Monday. The group will be responsible for defining a set of principles and processes for faculty, staff and students to submit concerns regarding campus building names, symbols and monuments, according to a memo sent to the USC community. Though the official Task Force was announced Monday, the Undergraduate and Graduate student governments previously passed resolutions in requesting the administration to acknowledge USC’s troubled history and to facilitate open discussions to reexamine building names. Ebadi said she hopes the task force will also shed light on historical injustice at the University. “Tough conversations must be had on the impact of the various monuments and symbols that we administer across campus, but the work cannot stop at mere conversations,” Ebadi wrote in an email to the Daily Trojan. “A mission statement praising equity and diversity ultimately loses its value if an administration cannot effectively implement action to change its own harmful practices.” Shaghayegh Ebadi, co-chief diversity director of USG, said the task force is a necessary step toward increasing support for marginalized communities on campus. Carry said the decision to create the task force comes on the heels of a national movement across many American universities to rethink the names of campus landmarks that may threaten certain populations. While the task force does not deal with a particular building or name, its members will help develop a way for the USC community to voice their concerns regarding campus nomenclature. The Task Force comprises nine architecture, design, public policy, philosophy, history and law professors, as well as three undergraduate and two graduate students. center_img “Let me emphasize, this task force will not end in a result,” Carry said. “There will not be any specific name changes as a result of this task force, but what will be crystal clear is a step by step sequence of how members in our community … can submit a request for that level of interrogation.” “The principles should be broad enough to be applied to a variety of circumstances rather than tailored to a particular issue or controversy, and the Task Force should not deal with any particular issue or controversy,” Quick wrote. “The Task Force should weigh all relevant considerations and develop criteria for making such decisions.” Carry said the task force is meant to outline the sequence of steps students, faculty and staff can take to help the University address change. “As we grow as a university community and as we grow as a nation, we are having important conversations about the names of certain buildings, monuments and symbols,” Quick wrote. “Many of these from our past may evoke views and practices that we no longer support and may cause pain for members of our community.” Anex-Ries said he is pleased with the diversity of voices represented on the task force. “This task force must embody a progressive mission to shed light on USC’s … cultural hegemony that continue to harm our marginalized student communities,” Ebadi wrote. “New naming policies must be developed to address these inequities alongside formative solutions and help guide the University into an age of true commitment to diversity and inclusion.” Paula Cannon, a professor of molecular microbiology and former president of the Academic Senate and Ainsley Carry, vice president of Student Affairs, will lead the task force. “The University itself needs a systemized way of changing things,” Anex-Ries said. “More specifically, [the Task Force] allows for us to create the framework to have more complex conversations across the University about why it is even important to consider why something is named.” “I definitely think [the task force] is a group that will definitely have very spirited debate,” Anex-Ries said. “Of course, I would always love to see more students on the task force, but for USC and for previous instances, I actually am impressed with the breadth of people they have been able to put on the task force.” last_img read more

Haaland was offered to Barça but preferred to sign Prince Boateng

first_imgThe Metropolitan is the big favorite to have the federation finals. After the last decision of the board of directors of the Spanish Federation from find a field in which up to four consecutive finals can be organized of their competitions, especially the Cup, the rojiblanco field of Metropolitan is the chosen one. Meets expectations, because so far – and especially at the end of the Champions– It has fulfilled perfectly in all the events it has hosted. It is not even ruled out that he will be chosen as the venue for the official matches of Spain, and in the Athletic They would be delighted with this possibility.Monchi continues to raise prices at Barça and City. The splendid work of Monchi as sports director of Seville still causing you to have many suitors and, specifically, in Barcelona they still have it as an option for the future. Equally, the City of Guardiola would be delighted to seize its services, although for now Monchi He is very identified and excited about his current work and is convinced that times will come when they will fight for titles of relevance. Winter market. Just a year ago, Barça de Valverde went on the market in search of a ‘9’ to reinforce a position in which Luis Suarez I was alone. It was a premise not to bring a ‘top’ player but one that came out at a good price and that lent a hand in the Copa del Rey and in some little demanding League match. The intermediaries moved quickly and even the Barça club bore the name of Haaland, an 18-year-old Norwegian boy who was starting to score goals and give good impressions in the Mold Norwegian. Barça considered that it was little baggage and that with his inexperience the challenge could come, so he preferred to bet on a veteran with more media vigor than football. That was Prince Boateng, who at 31 years old came from Sassuolo where he also did not leave a great business card (5 goals in 15 games). At the end, Boateng’s assignment was a disasterjust played and his presence prevented Haaland, who went to Salzburg, from traveling to Barcelona. The Borussia Dortmund It will be the team that now benefits from the goals of the forward revelation of the season.last_img read more

Indian Passport 79th Most Powerful in World, Japan Tops List

first_imgThe Indian passport has been ranked as the 79th most powerful in the world. According to the ranking by Henley and Partners Passport Index, Afghanistan and Iraq were the worst at 104 while Pakistan came close to them at 102. Pakistani passport allows one access to 33 countries.Read it at India Related Itemslast_img