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AIDA Cruises starts LNG fueling ops in Mediterranean ports

first_imgAIDAperla (Image courtesy of Aida Cruises)AIDA Cruises, a Carnival Corporation company, said it will start regular operations to supply its LNG-powered AIDAperla with liquefied natural gas during the vessel’s stay in three Mediterranean ports.Following successful tests, the cruise company will start the LNG bunkering operations in the Spanish port of Barcelona, France’s Marseille and Civitavecchia in Italy.AIDA Cruises said in a statement it was also in talks with Palma de Mallorca in Spain.On average, a cruise ship spends around 40 percent of its operating time in a port. Thanks to its dual-fuel engine, the AIDAperla can produce the required energy from LNG during the ship’s port berth, AIDA noted in the statement.The LNG supply in the port takes place via a truck-to-ship method.AIDAprima LNG bunkering in the port of HamburgAIDAperla is the sister vessel to LNG-powered AIDAprima that was delivered last year.AIDAprima, the company’s first vessel in the LNG-powered series has already been provided with LNG in all five ports of her Northern Europe cruises since May 2016. AIDAperla is the second cruise ship that is able to produce onboard power from LNG while docked.In April last year, Aida Cruises signed an LNG supply deal with Shell for its two vessels, with Shell becoming Aida Cruises’ exclusive strategic partner in all ports that provide LNG bunkering.Worth mentioning, AIDA Cruises is also awaiting the delivery of two fully LNG-powered cruise ships which will able to run on LNG in port and at sea as well.AIDAnova, currently being built at the Neptun Werft in Rostock is expected to be delivered in the fall of 2018 while its sister ship will reinforce the AIDA fleet in the spring of 2021. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

Angels’ Andrelton Simmons wraps up a ‘disappointing’ season as he approaches final year of his contract

first_imgANAHEIM — For a few years, the biggest decision hanging over the Angels’ front office was whether they would be able to sign Mike Trout to an extension. Now, it’s whether they’ll be able to lure one or two marquee pitchers this winter.But looming just in the background, there is Andrelton Simmons.As he finishes what he called a “disappointing” season, Simmons is approaching the end of the seven-year extension he signed with the Atlanta Braves before the Angels acquired him.Simmons is set to become a free agent after the 2020 season. Historically, elite defensive shortstops like Omar Vizquel, Barry Larkin and Ozzie Smith all played the position until they were 40. Cal Ripken Jr. made it until 35 before moving to third base.Simmons, a four-time Gold Glove winner, might be in that group.“I don’t see why not,” he said. “I don’t feel like I lost any steps. This year I kind of did (because of the ankle injury), but right now I feel really good about the ankle situation. I feel pretty good about moving around. I don’t see why not. I feel good at shortstop right now.”Angels general manager Billy Eppler, who worked for the Yankees throughout most of Jeter’s career, said a player’s mind can counter the effects of age.“I compare him to an elite point guard who has high court awareness and and anticipates the ball really well,” Eppler said. “Your overall baseball intelligence can help you continue to be impactful at a position as perhaps your sprint speed or overall foot speed or agility might start to regress.”This season, perhaps because of the ankle injury he first suffered lunging for first base on May 20, Simmons has sprung some holes in his game.Simmons’ Ultimate Zone Rating is the lowest of his career, pro-rated by playing time. His Defensive Runs Saved, however, are about the same as last year, on a per-game basis. Fielding percentage is considered an incomplete measure of defense, but Simmons’ right now has a career-worst .969 mark.“It’s hard for me to critique myself,” Simmons said. “I only see what I didn’t do well. I don’t know what the numbers say I’ve been doing. I know I’ve made some mistakes here and there. Everybody does, except Omar Vizquel. I feel like I could have done better overall. Not terrible, but not as good as I would want.”Manager Brad Ausmus said Simmons is “still the best defensive shortstop in the game.”At the plate, the decline has been more dramatic. All three elements of Simmons’ slash line – a .256 batting average, .301 on-base percentage and .355 slugging percentage – are worsts in his four seasons with the Angels.Statcast metrics that grade hitters on the quality of contact, not just the results, also rate Simmons in the bottom 2 percent in the league in expected slugging percentage and expected weighted on-base percentage.The injuries are likely responsible for much of that. Simmons was out for about five weeks with the first ankle injury. Then he came back – quicker than expected – and played for about a month before getting hurt again, missing three more weeks.“It’s been kind of a chopped-up season for him,” Ausmus said.Simmons and Eppler said rhythm at the plate is tough to establish with significant gaps in playing time.“I think that had a big impact,” Simmons said. “It’s not the only thing. I remember seeing Chipper Jones going through a little procedure with knee stuff and picking up right where he left off. It doesn’t happen in every case. This year has been a little tougher for me getting back into a rhythm and feeling comfortable.”Considering the way Simmons’ season has gone, it would be no surprise if the Angels waited until at least the middle of next season before deciding if they want to sign him to an extension.They can also further evaluate David Fletcher and Luís Rengifo, either of whom could become the everyday shortstop if Simmons isn’t around beyond 2020.Related Articles “It’s crossed my mind,” Simmons said, “but not seriously. I’m just trying to get back in good shape and start swinging the bat as well as I know I can.”The situation with Simmons is tricky because this year has been one of his worst, which he and the Angels attribute to a pair of ankle injuries that cost him two trips to the injured list.Also, Simmons just turned 30. His next contract will start with his age-31 season, which is approaching dangerous territory in shortstop years.Over the past 10 seasons, just 18.4 percent of the players who played at least 50 games in a season at shortstop have been 31 or older. Only 13.3 percent were 32 or older, and 9.5 percent 33 or older.The exceptions to the rule have been players such as Derek Jeter, who played shortstop until he was 40. Jimmy Rollins played shortstop until he was 36, and José Reyes until he was 34. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield center_img Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Or, the Angels could sign Simmons to an extension this winter, reworking his deal to lower his 2020 salary from $15 million, which would create more payroll space to add pitching. When the Angels signed Justin Upton to an extension in November 2017, they reduced his 2018 salary by more than $6 million to create payroll flexibility.A much more radical scenario is that the Angels could trade Simmons this winter, which would clear the entire $15 million to make upgrades elsewhere.That seems unlikely, though, considering how highly the Angels still think of him, even after an injury-marred season.“We understand what Andrelton brings,” Eppler said, “and value him playing in the middle of the diamond.”UP NEXTAngels (LHP Andrew Heaney, 4-4, 4.30 ERA) vs. Rays (TBD), Friday, 7:07 p.m., Fox Sports West, 830 AM Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter last_img read more