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University opens first new school in nearly a century

first_imgKnown as the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs, Notre Dame’s first new school in nearly a century opened this fall.Intended for both undergraduate and graduate students, the Keough School’s website said the school is focused on advancing integral human development through research, policy and practice. After the University announced its creation in 2014, history professor R. Scott Appleby was named the Marilyn Keough dean of the school.“The Keough School is a key player in fulfilling the University’s goal of internationalization,” Appleby said in an email. “All of Notre Dame’s college and schools, as well as Notre Dame International, are active and important participants in this effort.”According to the Keough School’s website, the school, which is based in the newly-constructed Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, addresses topics such as poverty, war, disease, political oppression, environmental degradation and other threats to dignity and human flourishing.Appleby said this year the school will focus on faculty, students and global policy studies in addition to working on new programs: one for undergraduates and one in policy studies with both a presence in Washington, D.C. and a network of international experts. The Keough School’s Master program in global affairs is already teaching its first class of students who came from areas across the world.Over the next three to five years, Appleby said the Keough School plans to continue this building phase.“We will continue to build a world class international faculty, welcome hundreds of gifted graduate and undergraduate students into the School and extend our networks of engagement and influence into the worlds of applied research, policy and practice of human rights, good governance, international development, peace-building and related areas,” Appleby said.Ted Beatty, associate dean for academic affairs at the Keough School, said alongside participating in pre-existing programs managed by various institutes that will be expanded in the School, undergraduate students will eventually have the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program of global affairs.“This program of global affairs will be a program that organizes what [students] do in their majors, supplemental majors or minors, language study, study abroad … in a way that integrates together and forms a coherent program of study,” Beatty said.The pre-existing seven institutes under the Keough School are The Center for Civil and Human Rights, the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.“One thing the Keough School does is re-organize those [institutes] together under one roof,” Beatty said. “We inherit some programs from the institutes. We’ll then build up from those and create some exciting new opportunities for Notre Dame undergraduates.”Appleby said he expects the full-fledged undergraduate program — which will aim to complement and globalize the disciplinary major — will begin with a relatively small number of students next year before growing in the coming years.“Short of enrolling in the full program, or in a supplementary major or minor in the Keough School, undergrads can also take individual courses offered by the School,” Appleby said. “In addition, there are and will be an array of extracurricular options for students, ranging from guest lectures and mini-seminars led by prominent world leaders, to applied research opportunities designed to complement regular coursework and stimulate global thinking.”After three years of “frenetic planning and recruiting” with the seven institutes and colleagues from Notre Dame’s other colleges and schools, Appleby said the Keough School received a new burst of energy upon its opening.“I am heartened but not surprised by the excitement and enthusiasm generated by the opening of the Keough School — expressions of which arrive daily from the Notre Dame family of alums and other fervent supporters, as well as from peers at other universities in the United States and around the world,” Appleby said.As for long-term goals, Appleby said he looks forward to seeing his successor leverage the resources that Notre Dame and its supporters have provided.“I’d wager that before too long, the Keough School and its faculty and graduates will be recognized as a world leader in placing human dignity at the center of every effort to build peace, heal the afflicted, stimulate economic growth and ensure education and security for the most vulnerable populations on the planet,” Appleby said.Tags: kellogg institute for international studies, Keough School of Global Affairs, Kroc Institutelast_img read more

Duke Energy supports youth literacy

first_imgThe Duke Energy Foundation provides philanthropic support to address needs vital to the health of our communities. Annually, the foundation funds approximately $2 million in charitable grants in Indiana. The Foundation’s investment priorities include K-to-career education, environment and community impact.Schools receiving Duke Energy 2018 summer reading program grants include: Plainfield, In. — Again this year, the Duke Energy Foundation is investing approximately $400,000 in Indiana youth statewide to improve literacy, including helping maintain and improve reading levels over the summer.“A child’s ability to read at grade level is one of the strongest indicators of whether that child will succeed in school and in life,” said Melody Birmingham-Byrd, Duke Energy state president for Indiana. “We are committed to supporting these summer reading programs that can give students the confidence they need to learn and grow.”In addition to school-year programs and reading summits, 18 Indiana schools are receiving grants ranging from approximately $6,000 to more than $25,000 for wide-ranging summer reading initiatives. (List of schools below.) The programs largely target students prior to third grade. Some examples include:Monroe County Community Schools – An immersive summer remedial reading program for struggling readers completing first and second grades. The program will also provide an intensive summer reading camp for identified at-risk children to keep them moving forward in their skills.Kokomo School Corporation – Will establish a four-week literacy camp for first- and second-grade students who are reading below grade level. The targeted students will receive a summer reading bag that includes 10 books and a “think sheet” for each book.Facts on reading and educationAccording to The Literacy Project:20 percent of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage50 percent of American adults cannot read a book written at the eighth-grade levelSix out of 10 American households do not buy a single book in an entire year85 percent of juvenile offenders have problems reading Clarksville Community School Corporation                              $16,000Crawford County Community School Corporation                   $19,500Decatur Community Schools                                                    $14,150Eastwood Elementary School                                                  $6,200Foundation of Monroe County Community Schools                 $23,655Greater Clark County Schools                                                 $19,150Hamilton Heights School Corporation                                      $25,257Kokomo School Corporation                                                    $24,722Lafayette School Corporation                                                   $23,824MSD Martinsville Schools                                                        $22,896Milan Community Schools Corporation                                    $19,187MSD of North Posey County                                                    $25,000New Castle Community School Corporation                            $8,205North Knox School Corporation                                               $25,000North Lawrence Community Schools                                       $14,776Salem Community Schools Corporation                                  $18,560South Vermillion Community Schools                                      $25,000Vigo County School Corporation                                              $24,394last_img read more

From the Editors: This section isn’t your escape

first_imgWe’re in the middle of a monthslong pandemic that is now hitting Southern California hard. If not done strategically and with health at the absolute forefront of decision making, playing any sport this fall will put not just the health of student-athletes, coaches and team personnel at risk but also that of the surrounding South Central community. Universities across the country are not incubated from the neighborhoods that surround them, meaning every NCAA-affiliated event carried out carelessly could endanger residents whether they are fans or not.   At the same time, it is evident that this brand is part of a flawed system reflecting the plague of systemic racism so deeply ingrained in our society. The student-athletes that make college sports function are using their platforms to say as much — and we should listen. The NCAA has long been known as an organization that exploits its student-athletes by reeling in hundreds of millions of dollars for predominantly white administrators, commissioners, athletic directors and coaches without directing a dime of that money toward the student-athletes generating its revenue. This dynamic is especially prevalent in college football and basketball — sports that make the most money and comprise the highest percentage of Black student-athletes. The Black Lives Matter movement has firmly ingrained itself in athletics, and that cannot and should not be undone. The work begun by Colin Kaepernick and carried on by Eric Reid, LeBron James and countless others has made a profound impact on sports, and athletes on both the professional and collegiate stage are continuing that today.   Note: This article was written prior to the postponement of Pac-12 sports through 2020. It’s our responsibility to tell these stories. It’s our responsibility to highlight and celebrate the achievements of Black student-athletes, both on and off the field, that are too often taken for granted. It’s our responsibility as journalists at USC to shed light on how college sports are not a vacuum outside of society but rather part of an inherently unequal hierarchical system. We know that USC Athletics is a major aspect of campus life for students, identity for alumni and pride for fans. USC Athletics is a brand, one that plays a central role to so many members of the University community. The term “Trojan Family” is perhaps best on display amid the backdrop of USC sports, and that’s a reality we don’t take lightly. The Daily Trojan is a completely independent, student-run platform, and it is our job to provide a voice to our local community and student body. This means increasing profiles that highlight the achievements and contributions on and off the field of the Black student-athletes in our community, dedicating ourselves to covering social justice issues within USC Athletics and the wider world of sports and holding the Athletic Department accountable to follow through with its initiatives to fight for racial justice both within Trojan athletics and beyond. We want to look at the big picture when reporting on our student-athletes. All of us love sports, but that doesn’t mean the system providing us with such rich and entertaining moments is or has ever been anything close to perfect. The student-athletes who make you proud to call yourself a Trojan are reckoning with a sporting landscape that doesn’t prioritize their equity.  Tradition is everything to USC, but change is demanded for a reason. These are just some of the many ways we can and must listen to the voices — especially those of color — in our community and help do our part in effecting lasting, tangible change.  College athletes have said as much. A group of Pac-12 football players wrote a letter in the Players’ Tribune Aug. 2 stating they will opt out of the 2020 season if the NCAA does not remedy these shortcomings. Student-athletes at USC formed the United Black Student-Athletes Association in June to demand that the Athletic Department better support its Black student-athletes and actively fight racial injustice. center_img Statues of USC’s 1969 defensive line, known as “The Wild Bunch,” cast a shadow outside of Heritage Hall. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) There is a multitude of questions regarding whether fall sports will be played this year. Administrators are forced to consider not just the economic necessity and logistical feasibility of safely carrying out a 2020 season but also the ethics of taking such a risk in the first place.  Tailgating? Wouldn’t bet on it. Fans in the stadiums? Unlikely. Games taking place at all? Far too early to tell, but there’s no guarantee — no matter what the schedule says.  This is a moment when we must collectively understand that acknowledging systemic injustice without actively working to dismantle it is simply not enough. So, until we’re all told there won’t be college sports this semester, the Daily Trojan sports team will continue to bring you as close to your typical fan experience as we can with the resources available to us, even if much of that work will be done remotely. Now, to add on, student-athletes are having to fight for uniform coronavirus prevention protocols and medical coverage from the NCAA during a pandemic that disproportionately affects the Black community. This is our promise to reflect these complex truths in our reporting. This is our promise to improve upon our regrettable lack of diversity among our staff and our columnists to uplift the voices that we have historically undercovered. In just about every way, this won’t be a normal semester for anyone in the USC community. Athletics are no exception, and that’s not just because the football schedule will exclude Notre Dame for the first time since World War II. Most people across the sporting landscape have concerns about the feasibility of safely carrying out a fall sports season. Almost all are hoping there’s a way to make it happen. Both statements apply to us. last_img read more