Blogs

Governor Wolf Announces Naloxone Standing Order to Combat Heroin Epidemic (+ FAQs)

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Naloxone FAQs:What is naloxone?Naloxone is a medication that can temporarily reverse an overdose that is caused by an opioid drug (prescription pain medication or heroin). When given during an overdose, naloxone blocks the effects of opioids on the brain and restores breathing within two to eight minutes. Naloxone has been used safely by medical professionals for more than 40 years and has only one function: to reverse the effects of opioids on the brain and respiratory system in order to prevent death. Naloxone has no potential for abuse- a person can’t get high or become addicted to it – and it is safe to use. (Naloxone does not work to reverse overdose from other types of substances).How do I get naloxone?Family members and friends can access this medication by obtaining a prescription from their family doctor or by using the standing order (a prescription written for the general public, rather than specifically for an individual) issued by Rachel Levine, M.D., PA Physician General. The standing order is kept on file at many pharmacies, or may be downloaded here.If you cannot access Scribd, you can also download the standing order here from the Department of Health’s website.Naloxone prescriptions can be filled at most pharmacies. Although the medication may not be available for same day pick up, it can often be ordered and available within a day or two.What types of naloxone are available?Two of the most common ways that naloxone is administered are intranasal (nasal spray) and the auto-injector. Please note, not all pharmacies stock both forms and insurance coverage may vary depending on the type of medication being purchased and each individual insurance plan. Check your insurance prescription formulary or call your benefits manager to determine if the medication is covered by your particular plan or if your purchase of the medication will be an out-of-pocket cost.Intranasal currently has two pieces that are easily assembled: a prefilled medication tube and an atomization device which is sold separately. The nasal piece may not be stocked at your local pharmacy; however, they may assist in ordering it. Additionally, the nasal atomization device can be ordered from a number of medical supply companies without a prescription.The Auto-injector comes in a manufactured dosage form (similar to an epi-pen) and has a recorded message to talk you through giving the medication.How do I administer naloxone?In addition to talking to your healthcare provider or the pharmacist about how to use naloxone, individuals giving this medication to someone should take the online training ahead of time. Training is available at one of the Department of Health approved training sites: Get Naloxone Now or PA Virtual Training Network. These easy to understand, brief trainings explain how to recognize the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose, what to do in the event of an overdose, and instruct on how to give naloxone. While it is not necessary to obtain a training certificate in order to purchase naloxone, learning these important details will help you respond properly in the event of an overdose and also meet the immunity requirements of PA Act 139.Could I get in trouble for giving someone naloxone (statutory immunity)?Good Samaritan: Through the ‘Good Samaritan’ provision of Act 139, friends, loved ones and bystanders are encouraged to call 911 for emergency medical services in the event an overdose is witnessed and to stay with the individual until help arrives. The provision offers certain criminal and civil protections to the caller so that they cannot get in trouble for being present, witnessing and reporting an overdose.Administering Naloxone: Physicians are permitted to write third party prescriptions for naloxone and you are immune from liability for giving naloxone if you believed the person was suffering from an opioid overdose (heroin or prescription pain medication) and you called for medical help/911 after giving the medication.Does insurance cover naloxone?Insurance companies vary in how they cover naloxone and other drugs used to treat an opioid overdose. Prior to having a naloxone prescription filled with a pharmacy, consumers are encouraged to check with their insurance carriers to find out whether naloxone is a covered benefit under their policy, and, if so, what form of naloxone is covered, and any cost-sharing amounts that may apply under their policy.Will Fee-for-Service and the managed care organizations (MCOs) pay for naloxone dispensed under the standing order for Medical Assistance recipients?Yes.Will Medical Assistance require a prescription in order for the pharmacist to fill the naloxone for a Medical Assistance recipient?Yes, per 55 Pa Code, Chapter 1121 – Pharmaceutical Services – §1121.52, pharmacists can treat the standing order as a verbal order for Medical Assistance recipients.Can a person other than the eligible Medical Assistance recipient (friend or family member) obtain the naloxone at the pharmacy on the recipient’s behalf? Will the Medical Assistance Program make payment?PA Medical Assistance will make payment for naloxone for the eligible Medical Assistance recipient.Is prior authorization required by Medical Assistance for any of the naloxone products or supplies?The Evzio Auto-Injector is covered by Medical Assistance, but requires prior authorization. Generic naloxone is covered without the need for prior authorization.Where can a pharmacy access Medical Assistance billing procedures for naloxone and the nasal actuator?The Fee-for-Service Program will post information related to billing for naloxone on the DHS Pharmacy Services website. Pharmacies will need to contact each MCO individually to obtain information about their billing procedures.Will copays apply for the naloxone products and nasal actuator?No, the Medical Assistance copay will not apply.Is there a limit to the number of times that a Medical Assistance recipient can get naloxone?No, there is no limit to the number of fills that can be obtained.How can someone with an addiction to prescription pain medicines, heroin or other drugs get help?Treatment for drug abuse and addiction is available! You can find out more by calling the County Drug and Alcohol Office where you live. For more information or to get the contact information for your local office visit the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs website or call 717-783-8200.While it may be uncomfortable to talk to someone about their substance abuse problem, research shows that it is more likely for an individual to seek help for their problem within 30 days following an overdose if someone talks to them right after the overdose event about going to treatment.Are there any other standing orders in Pennsylvania?Yes. There have been three well publicized standing orders that we are aware of to date that impact Pennsylvania which include: 1) CVS who has developed one for their pharmacies nationwide; 2) Montgomery County; and 3) Allegheny County.The standing order being signed today does not affect these standing orders. Instead the Physician General’s standing order expands upon them to ensure statewide access.Naloxone Standing Order by Governor Tom Wolf*If you cannot access Scribd, you can also download the standing order here from the Department of Health’s website.# # # Governor Wolf Announces Naloxone Standing Order to Combat Heroin Epidemic (+ FAQs) Government That Works,  Press Release,  Results,  Substance Use Disorder On January 10, 2018, Governor Tom Wolf declared the opioid epidemic a statewide disaster. Under this declaration, emergency service providers are now able to leave naloxone behind after a 911 visit. Centralized Coordinating Entities (CCE) can contact the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) to obtain naloxone for first responders under their jurisdiction. For more information, visit PCCD’s website. Updated with the paragraph above: February 15, 2018, 12:00 PMUpdated with FAQs: October 29, 2015, 3:59 PM Posted: October 28, 2015, 1:20 PMHarrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today continued his “Government That Works” Tour and announced a significant step forward in his administration’s fight against the heroin epidemic in Pennsylvania. Governor Wolf stood with Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine at the Pennsylvania Medical Society as Dr. Levine signed a statewide standing order for naloxone*, a medication that can reverse an overdose that is caused by an opioid drug. The governor was also joined by Secretary Ted Dallas, Secretary Gary Tennis, Secretary Karen Murphy, and Chairman Josh Shapiro.“This standing order is the next step in my administration’s fight against the addiction and overdose epidemic in our state,” said Governor Wolf. “We must do all that we can to support those Pennsylvania families suffering from the effects of addiction. I am proud to take this action with my cabinet members today.”Through the signing of this standing order, Dr. Levine has signed a prescription for naloxone to all Pennsylvanians. For more information about naloxone and how to administer it, please visit the Department of Drug and Alcohol Program’s page on overdose reversal.“Making it possible for all Pennsylvania residents to access the life-saving drug naloxone is a huge victory in our battle against drug overdose deaths in the commonwealth,” said Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine. “I am proud to sign this standing order and continue the efforts of the Wolf Administration to protect the most vulnerable Pennsylvanians. This forward-thinking initiative gives people the tools they need to keep their communities and families intact.”The rise in heroin addiction and prescription drug abuse has quickly led to a public health crisis in Pennsylvania, where 1 in 4 families suffer from the effects of substance abuse addiction. Heroin and opioid overdose are now the leading cause of accidental death in Pennsylvania, killing more individuals than those involved in fatal motor vehicle accidents. In 2014, 2,400 Pennsylvanians died from drug overdoses.“Addiction can happen to anyone from any walk of life, and heroin is now the second leading cause of years of life lost,” said Department of Human Services Secretary Ted Dallas. “I am not going to accept that. We must fight to ensure our children, our loved ones, and our neighbors have access to these critical life-saving programs.”“Too many Pennsylvania families are being affected by this crisis,” said Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs Secretary Gary Tennis. “In addition to finding solutions like these to save lives, we are also working hard to raise awareness and break down stigmas about substance abuse disorders. My department will continue to work tirelessly to provide the best possible recovery and treatment options, to ensure that we do not see high rates of overdose recurrences.”“It is our goal at the Department of Health is to ensure that life-saving resources such as naloxone are available to every Pennsylvanian,” said Department of Health Secretary Dr. Karen Murphy. “Educating Pennsylvanians on how to use naloxone in case of an emergency is essential to curbing the devastating number of opioid-related overdose deaths that we have seen in the commonwealth over the past several years.”“The opioid epidemic is a serious public health issue and is it also an issue of public safety,” said Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency Chairman Josh Shapiro. “PCCD is working to ensure that the healthcare and law enforcement communities are working collaboratively to bring all our resources to this fight.”Since his inauguration, Governor Wolf has worked with his administration to provide real solutions not only to save lives but also to help addicted individuals and their families get the treatment they need to live long, productive lives. Such actions taken by the Wolf Administration include the development of the ABC-MAP prescription drug monitoring program, the creation of the interagency Heroin Task Force, the support for the use of naloxone at schools across the Commonwealth, and stocking all Pennsylvania State Police cars with the naloxone drug. Since equipping State Police cars with naloxone, over 300 lives have been saved with this drug.Governor Wolf’s 2015-16 budget proposes $7.5 million in funds to provide more naloxone to police and to provide more and better treatment options for Pennsylvanians.“My administration, law enforcement agencies, those in the health care field, those in county services offices, and many others work hard every day to fight back against heroin epidemic,” concluded Governor Wolf. “My greatest hope is that today’s action will continue to aid these statewide efforts to overcome the addiction and overdose crisis in Pennsylvania.” October 28, 2015last_img read more

Red Sox homer their way past Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers for World Series title

first_imgRings are on the menu. #WorldSeries pic.twitter.com/X7VMCu7Lqf— MLB (@MLB) October 29, 2018 Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start For all the criticism of Dave Roberts’ pitching decisions – they weren’t good – it was a lack of offense that did sink the Dodgers ultimately.They hit a weak .180 (34 for 189) in the World Series and were outscored 28-16 by the team that led baseball in runs scored this season. When it came time to adjust against a steady diet of good pitching, the National League’s home run leaders failed to do it adequately and slugged only occasionally.With Price pitching on short rest in Game 5, the Dodgers’ goal was to drive up his pitch count and get him out of the game or capitalize on his fatigue. That never materialized. They went down on fewer than 10 pitches four times in the first seven innings against Price, keeping his pitch count low enough for him to pitch into the eighth inning and hand the ball where he handed the ball to Joe Kelly.The Dodgers didn’t even put a ball in play over the final two innings. Kelly struck out three Dodgers in a row in the eighth. Chris Sale did the same in the ninth. Freese’s gifted triple was the Dodgers’ last hit until next spring.“I expect us to be back here next year – but celebrating on the field,” Roberts said. How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Mookie’s first #postseason home run came at a GREAT time. pic.twitter.com/UYlNbZEgfF— MLB (@MLB) October 29, 2018 Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Steve. Pearce.He’s done it again. #WorldSeries pic.twitter.com/OYq9aMbzLn— MLB (@MLB) October 29, 2018 For the second year in a row, baseball’s champion was crowned at Dodger Stadium and it wasn’t the home team, an indignity no team had experienced since the 1936-37 New York Giants.“We did too many bad things in the playoffs and that’s why the Red Sox are the World Series champs for 2018 and we’re losing again, back-to-back Series,” Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig said. “Everybody in this clubhouse feels bad. Everybody feels sad. But we didn’t do the things to win a championship.”It took the longest game in the history of the World Series for the Dodgers to even get one victory in this Series. Their wait for a title will go into a 31st year and another blue October will be remembered for the slumped shoulders of Clayton Kershaw.Whatever demons have denied Los Angeles for three decades now have saved their most pointed torment for Kershaw.“Disappointed. Yeah, just disappointed, I think,” Kershaw said when asked his emotions after coming up short in October again. “There’s only one team that can win and we know that. But it just hurts worse when you make it all the way and get second place. So having done that two years in a row now – it doesn’t make it any easier.” Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco PreviousThe Boston Red Sox celebrate after defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsBoston Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez, jumps on pitcher Chris Sale after he struck out Los Angeles Dodgers Manny Machado, #8, to win the World Series. Boston won the game 5-1 and the series 4-1. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox celebrate with The Commissioner’s Trophy after defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ Steve Pearce celebrates after being name the World Series MVP after defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ David Price celebrates with The Commissioner’s Trophy after defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox celebrate their World Series win after Boston Red Sox pitcher Chris Sale struck out Los Angeles Dodgers Manny Machado, left, in the 9th inning in game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. Boston won the game 5-1 and the series 4-1. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pedro Baez stands on the mound as the Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce rounds the bases after his second home run of the game in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce rounds the bases after his second home run of the game abasing the Los Angeles Dodgers in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pedro Baez stands on the mound as the Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce rounds the bases after his second home run of the game in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Pedro Baez sits in the dugout after giving up a home run to the Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce, his second of the game, in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price reacts after getting Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig to ground out to end the seventh inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes hangs his head in the dugout next to Justin Turner in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers right fielder Yasiel Puig watches from the dugout during the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)A Red Sox fan celebrates during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Dodgers fans don’t look happy during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers look on from the dugout in the 9th inning in game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. Boston won the game 5-1 and the series 4-1. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price is taken out of the game in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Fans applaud as Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price is removed in the eighth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ Steve Pearce points to his teammates as he celebrates hitting a solo home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Enrique Hernandez of the Los Angeles Dodgers goes up the wall, but can’t reach a Steve Pearce ( not pictured) of the Boston Red Sox solo home run in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw, Corey Seager and Rich Hill, from left, watch from the dugout in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ Steve Pearce, center, celebrates with Xander Bogaerts and Christian Vazquez after hitting a solo home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the eighth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Los Angeles Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger, Corey Seager and Chase Utley, from left, watch from the dugout railing during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez celebrates with Christian Vazquez after his solo home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the seventh inning inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox J.D. Martinez, #28, is greeted by teammates after he knocked in a solo homer in the 7th inning in game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers bench looks on late during game five of the World Series against the Boston Red Sox at Dodger Stadium on Sat, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. against the Boston Red Sox won 5-1. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez celebrates his solo home run with Xander Bogaerts after scoring past Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes in the seventh inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Boston’s J.D. Martinez trots home as Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw looks at the scoreboard after Martinez’s solo home run during the seventh inning of Game 5 of the World Series on Sunday night at Dodger Stadium. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez celebrates as he scores past Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes after his solo home run in the seventh inning inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw watches a solo home run by the Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez leave the park in the seventh inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw sits in the dugout after giving up a solo home run to the Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez in the seventh inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw sits in the dugout after giving up a solo home run to the Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw sits in the dugout after giving up a solo home run to the Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw heads to the dugout after giving up a solo home run to the Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw reacts as the Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts rounds the bases after his solo home run in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Manny Machado can’t reach a single by Boston Red Sox’ J.D. Martinez in the fourth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese slides into third for a triple as Boston Red Sox third baseman Rafael Devers applies a late tag in the third inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese slides into third for a triple against the Boston Red Sox in the third inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price throws to the plate in the third inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Dodgers’ first base coach George Lombard talks with Yasiel Puig after his single in the second inning against the Boston Red Sox in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Dodgers’ first base coach George Lombard watches Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price pitch in game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Dodgers legend Sandy Koufax applauds after the top of the first inning during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Manny Machado strikes out swinging to end the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw throws to the plate in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese celebrates in the dugout after his solo home run against the Boston Red Sox in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese celebrates his solo home run against the Boston Red Sox in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese celebrates his solo home run against the Boston Red Sox in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw sits in the dugout after giving up a two-run home run by Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw walks to the dugout after giving up a two-run home run by Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw walks to the dugout after giving up a two-run home run by Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw watches a two-run home run by Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce leave the park in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw is greeted by Enrique Hernandez in the dugout before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Orel Hershiser throws out the ceremonial first pitch before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)The Budweiser Clydesdales make their way across the outfield before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw stretches in the field before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts talks to reporters before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts celebrates in the dugout after his solo home run in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Boston Red Sox’ Mookie Betts, right, celebrates with Boston Red Sox left fielder Andrew Benintendi after his solo home run in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw walks around the mound as Boston Red Sox right fielder Mookie Betts rounds the bases after his solo home run in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Chris Taylor leaps in vain looking for Boston Red Sox right fielder Mookie Betts’s solo home run in the sixth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Manager Dave Roberts looks over his notes next to bench coach Bob Geren in the fifth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Protesters hang a banner off the top deck in support of transgender rights during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw celebrates after getting the Boston Red Sox’ Xander Bogaerts to hit into a double play to end the top of the fourth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price reacts after getting Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder Enrique Hernandez to pop up with a runner on second to end the third inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price walks to the dugout after striking out Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes to end the second inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Dodgers’ first base coach George Lombard during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Dodgers’ first base coach George Lombard jogs to his position during game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)in the xxx inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman David Freese is greeted at the top of the dugout after his solo home run against the Boston Red Sox in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Manny Machado shows his displeasure with home plate umpire Jeff Nelson after striking out swinging to end the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese celebrates his solo home run with third base coach Chris Woodward in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese celebrates his solo home run in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese watches his solo home run leave the park in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox starting pitcher David Price throws to the plate in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox first baseman Steve Pearce, center, celebrates with teammates after his two-run home run in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw throws to the plate in the first inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Actors Matt Damon and Billy Crudup in the stands before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Actor Jason Bateman and Jimmy Kimmel in the stands before the start of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox David Price, #24, chases down Los Angeles Dodgers Clayton Kershaw, 22, to tag him out on the first base line during the 5th inning in game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese, 25, beats the throw to Boston Red Sox third baseman Rafael Devers, 11, for a triple in the third inning of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese connected on this pitch in the 3rd inning for a triple in game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig connected on this pitch for a single in the 2nd inning of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers David Freese, #25, points to the right field seats as he rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run in the first inning of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers Clayton Kershaw reacts to Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce hitting 2-run homer in the first inning of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox Steve Pearce is greeted by teammates after hitting a 2-run homer in the first inning of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers Clayton Kershaw stretches before the start of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. The Dodgers trail the Red Sox 3-1 in the series. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodger great Orel Hershiser waves to the crowd before throwing out the ceremonial first pitch before game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Mickey Hatcher and Orel Hershiser get their photo taken after Hershiser throws out the ceremonial first pitch to his old catcher before game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers Mickey Hatcher and Orel Hershiser throw out the first pitch before the start of game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium Sunday, October 28, 2018. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw warms up in the outfield as the Budweiser Clydesdales travel the outfield before game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Boston Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez makes sure Los Angeles Dodgers Chris Taylor is out after he strikes out to begin the fifth inning of game five of the World Series at Dodger Stadium on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 95ExpandLOS ANGELES — A year ago, the Dodgers trudged off into the winter with no regrets, at least none that they would admit.They were just as good as the Houston Astros, they believed, just as worthy of a championship. It had eluded them but they would return to claim what they felt they deserved.It’s going to be hard to convince themselves of that this time.The World Series mulligan they craved lasted just five games. The Boston Red Sox dismissed them in Game 5 on Sunday, hitting four home runs (two by Series MVP Steve Pearce) in a 5-1 victory to claim their fourth World Series title in the past 15 years. No longer the Superman who had tried to will the Dodgers to a championship in the past, this Kershaw with the diminished velocity gave up three home runs Sunday – a two-run shot to Pearce in the first inning, putting the Dodgers down to stay, and solo homers to Mookie Betts (ending an 0-for-13 slide) and J.D. Martinez.“I thought honestly Kersh was throwing a good game,” Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes said. “Solo homers got us in the end. He kept us tight, 2-1, for most of the game. Then a couple mistakes to a really good team over there. They have a good lineup. They make you pay. I thought we were doing a pretty good job, for the most part. They just kind of outslugged us.”Pitching in a postseason game that could end the Dodgers’ season for the 10th time (thesixth start), Kershaw now has a 5.40 ERA in those games. Six of the 10 were season-ending losses for the Dodgers and Kershaw has given up eight home runs in those potential elimination games, more than any other pitcher in history.In his six starts in those elimination games, Kershaw has a 6.06 ERA. According to Baseball-Reference.com, only 24 pitchers in baseball history have started four or more elimination games for their team. None have an ERA as high as Kershaw in those must-win situations.“He doesn’t quit, man. He’s one of the best,” said Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen, Kershaw’s teammate in six painful Octobers now. “People need to be grateful to see a pitcher like that in their generation. We might not see another one in a while. He might go down as one of the best lefties to ever play this game.“Yes, we struggle. You can say whatever. You can say we struggle in the postseason or whatever. Still, I’m proud of Kersh. I’m proud of how he competes. He never gives up. He goes out there and competes and tries to lift his team. Sometimes it doesn’t go your way and you fall short. But that’s what gets us better. I know that Kersh is going to keep motivating himself and try to get back here on this stage next year. That’s what we’re going to do now.”Whether Kershaw makes that effort in a Dodgers’ uniform remains the first off-season question the team needs to answer. After Sunday’s loss, Kershaw again said he has not made a decision on his opt-out clause, saying he has three days to decide whether to use it – correcting himself from earlier this month when he thought it was a 10-day window after the end of the World Series.“I’ve got three days now to think about all of that stuff before anything happens,” Kershaw said. “So it will be an eventful three days for me and I’ll try to figure it out.”The postseason redemption Kershaw must crave belongs to Red Sox left-hander David Price this fall. Pitching on short rest, Price held the Dodgers to three hits over seven innings in Game 5, claiming his second victory in the Series. Two of the hits in Game 5 came from David Freese, placed in the leadoff spot because the Dodgers didn’t know how long the left-handed Price would go before being replaced by a right-handed reliever.Freese did his part. He homered off Price in the first inning and legged out a triple in the third when right fielder J.D. Martinez lost his deep fly ball in the dusky sky.But the Dodgers stranded Freese at third after that gift, their only at-bats with runners in scoring position in Game 5. That was just as well. They hit .200 (4 for 20) with RISP in this series and a dreadful .192 (20 for 104) in the postseason – a number remarkable for not having sunk their chances earlier.Related Articles Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies #WorldSeries hero? David Freese knows something about that. pic.twitter.com/8Ca8ZqA7P8— MLB (@MLB) October 29, 2018 Miiiiight be time to get those M-V-P chants going.Steve Pearce goes yard AGAIN! pic.twitter.com/g4p96eK2ED— FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) October 29, 2018 Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Halloween Getaway 10 Creepiest Hotels in America

first_img Halloween is the perfect time of year for all things spooky. There are horror flicks to binge-watch, Edgar Allan Poe stories to read, and of course great debates on whether ghosts are real or products of our imagination. With paranormal interest on the rise, people want to know if things exist beyond our physical world. According to the 2017 Chapman University Survey of American Fears, 52.3 percent of respondents believe that places can be haunted by spirits. Plus, with the popularity of shows like Ghost Adventures and Haunted Towns, paranormal technology equipment has helped us better understand electromagnetic fields, radio frequency, and other factors that might contribute to specter sightings. Curious about spirits? You don’t have to go to the extremes to catch up on eerie folklore. For the ultimate Halloween experience, pack up your suitcase and spend the night at one of America’s creepiest hotels. These structures are said to be hotbeds for paranormal activity, considering some past guests haven’t really “checked out” yet. From bedside visits to phantom gatherings, these historic hotels don’t come short on ghostly happenings.Gettysburg Hotel Stay on target The Battle of Gettysburg was one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Even though the Confederate and Union armies are long gone, their ghosts are still said to haunt many local landmarks, including the Gettysburg Hotel. The building, which was used as a spot to tend to wounded soldiers, is said to be haunted by Union soldier James Culbertson. Rachel, another specter, is said to make her rounds on the property as well. While we don’t know her story, it’s possible she was a Civil War nurse involved in caretaking soldiers there. Book Here Copper Queen Hotel Salem already has a creepy reputation, and the Hawthorne Hotel adds to the town’s mysterious folklore. It is said that this building is very haunted, with reports of the most activity occurring in room 325 and room 612. Visitors have heard babies crying at night, things have moved without an explanation, and there have been reports of spirits walking up and down the halls.Book HereMore on Halloween:20 Creepy Vintage Halloween PhotosThe Terror Lurking Around Halloween Horror Nights 28Zombie Makeup Tutorial: How to Look ‘Undead’ This Halloween Remember the beautiful setting of The Shining? Well, you can stay at The Stanley Hotel, the place that inspired author Stephen King to craft the legendary horror story. The hotel isn’t clandestine about their ghostly guests either. You can go on a Night Spirit Tour to learn more about its paranormal activity, including spirits of a former maid and the hotel’s founder, Flora Stanley.Book HereHawthorne Hotel Chicago isn’t only known for its deep-dish pizza, sports culture, and windy weather. The city is also home to some of the most haunted buildings in the U.S. If you’re “dying” to visit, book your vacation stay at the Congress Plaza Hotel. This historic landmark is home to ghostly bridesmaids, floating hands in walls, and a room on the 12th floor that’s padlocked because of its reported paranormal activity.Book HereDriskill Hotel Charleston is home to the Francis Marion Hotel, a gorgeous southern building with all the hospitality perks. The pretty landmark though is allegedly the site of many ghosts, including a Yankee gentleman Ned Cohen. According to local legend, Cohen fell in love with a southern woman, but their relationship didn’t work out due to conflicting views. Distraught, Cohen ended his life at the hotel and he’s reportedly still seen there today. Windows have rattled for no reason and people have felt someone caressing their cheeks at night.Book HereThe Stanley Hotel Most hotels don’t hype up paranormal activity, but the Crescent Hotel and Spa embraces its status as one of the creepiest and most haunted landmarks in the U.S.  It previously served as a lavish retreat for wealthy southerners, a women’s college, and a hospital for cancer patients. With all the change over the years, it’s no question that ghostly sightings might frequently happen. Take a Crescent Ghost Tour at night to learn more about the property’s history, haunts, and unique past.Book HereCongress Plaza Hotel Glamour still lives on at The Hollywood Roosevelt, which used to be a popular hub for movie stars from the ’30s to the ’60s. The hotel’s famous guest roster includes Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, and Montgomery Clift. Even though these starlets passed away years ago, some still spend time in their favorite rooms. People have reported an apparition of Clift outside room 928, while Monroe’s reflection is said to appear in one of the hotel mirrors.Book HereHotel Pennsylvania Built in 1919, Hotel Pennsylvania has hosted Big Apple visitors for nearly 100 years. The hotel’s proximity to Madison Square Garden, the Empire State Building, and other urban landmarks make it a popular place to spend the night, but it’s also allegedly haunted. Witness accounts described shadow apparitions over their beds and unexplainable noises coming from the hallways. It’s also the place where Frank Olson, a U.S. Army bacteriologist, mysteriously died in the early 1950s.Book HereCrescent Hotel and Spa Ghost towns, saloons, and mining might be memories of the old Wild West, but the Copper Queen Hotel gives you a glimpse of what life was like at the time. Along with the vintage decor, this lodging spot is visited by long-gone guests. Julia Lowell, a former lady of the light, is one of the most famous ghosts there. Sadly Lowell died of a broken heart on site, but her presence is felt by visitors throughout the hotel. If you want to learn more about Julia and her time at the hotel, you can stay in a special room named after her.Book HereThe Hollywood Roosevelt What if your spooky rooms inspired a rock song? Well, that’s what happened for The Driskill. Concrete Blonde, a band from the ’80s and ’90s, named one of their songs after ghostly encounters at the building. Dubbed “Ghost of a Texas Ladies Man,” it tells the story of a hotel guest that’s unfazed by a cowboy apparition haunting his space. We’ll keep the lights on now.Book HereFrancis Marion Hotel Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Becomes Universal Halloween Horror MazeLife-Sized Jabba the Hutt For Sale on Craigslist for $100 last_img read more