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SBU Prof. Named First Andrew Carnegie Fellow from a Long Island College

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Stony Brook University professor was the first educator from a college on Long Island to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow when he won the prestigious fellowship this week.Jared Farmer, an environmental historian and award-winning adjunct professor of history, plans to use the $200,000 award to complete a creative non-fiction book on the human relationship with long-lived trees and our larger relationship with nature in a time of climate change.“I am bringing together the history of trees and the science of longevity to contemplate the ethics and politics of long-term thinking in the Anthropocene,” said Farmer. “I’m a historian by training, but this new project includes aspects of science writing as well as creative writing.”Farmer is one of 35 fellows recognized by the program, which aims to support emerging humanities scholars that are working to strengthen the US democracy, drive creativity, explore global connections and improve environments. The program launched in 2015 and each fellow publishes a book or major study.The professor, who earned his PhD in history from Stanford University, previously authored three books, including the award-winning On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape. He began teaching at Stony Brook a decade ago.“Climate change is not only the policy problem of our time; it is also a problem of time,” Farmer said. “It requires thinking and caring in the long term—beyond the moment, the individual, and the species. I think it’s important to find historical precedents for long-term stewardship of the more-than-human world. To the extent possible in 2017, I want to write a hopeful book—one that shows the shared solicitudes of science, religion, and the humanities.”last_img read more

Duke Energy supports youth literacy

first_imgThe Duke Energy Foundation provides philanthropic support to address needs vital to the health of our communities. Annually, the foundation funds approximately $2 million in charitable grants in Indiana. The Foundation’s investment priorities include K-to-career education, environment and community impact.Schools receiving Duke Energy 2018 summer reading program grants include: Plainfield, In. — Again this year, the Duke Energy Foundation is investing approximately $400,000 in Indiana youth statewide to improve literacy, including helping maintain and improve reading levels over the summer.“A child’s ability to read at grade level is one of the strongest indicators of whether that child will succeed in school and in life,” said Melody Birmingham-Byrd, Duke Energy state president for Indiana. “We are committed to supporting these summer reading programs that can give students the confidence they need to learn and grow.”In addition to school-year programs and reading summits, 18 Indiana schools are receiving grants ranging from approximately $6,000 to more than $25,000 for wide-ranging summer reading initiatives. (List of schools below.) The programs largely target students prior to third grade. Some examples include:Monroe County Community Schools – An immersive summer remedial reading program for struggling readers completing first and second grades. The program will also provide an intensive summer reading camp for identified at-risk children to keep them moving forward in their skills.Kokomo School Corporation – Will establish a four-week literacy camp for first- and second-grade students who are reading below grade level. The targeted students will receive a summer reading bag that includes 10 books and a “think sheet” for each book.Facts on reading and educationAccording to The Literacy Project:20 percent of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage50 percent of American adults cannot read a book written at the eighth-grade levelSix out of 10 American households do not buy a single book in an entire year85 percent of juvenile offenders have problems reading Clarksville Community School Corporation                              $16,000Crawford County Community School Corporation                   $19,500Decatur Community Schools                                                    $14,150Eastwood Elementary School                                                  $6,200Foundation of Monroe County Community Schools                 $23,655Greater Clark County Schools                                                 $19,150Hamilton Heights School Corporation                                      $25,257Kokomo School Corporation                                                    $24,722Lafayette School Corporation                                                   $23,824MSD Martinsville Schools                                                        $22,896Milan Community Schools Corporation                                    $19,187MSD of North Posey County                                                    $25,000New Castle Community School Corporation                            $8,205North Knox School Corporation                                               $25,000North Lawrence Community Schools                                       $14,776Salem Community Schools Corporation                                  $18,560South Vermillion Community Schools                                      $25,000Vigo County School Corporation                                              $24,394last_img read more

Student tickets for Final Four sell out

first_img Published on April 2, 2013 at 11:15 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+ All of Syracuse University’s allotted Final Four tickets have sold out, according to a Tuesday SU Athletics news release.Special packages including a hotel stay and tickets remain available through AnthonyTravel.com, according to the release.The student allotment of 700 tickets sold out Monday. Tickets were sold to student season-ticket-holders Monday starting at 10 a.m. At 4:30 p.m. the sale was opened to all full-time Syracuse students. The student allotment sold out 30 minutes later, Otto’s Army President Ben Glidden said.Student tickets cost $40 and cover a ticket for the national semifinal against Michigan on Saturday night and the championship game Monday night, if SU advances.For the semifinals Saturday, SU students will be assigned a floor seat behind Sour Sitrus Society for the Orange’s game against Michigan — tipoff is scheduled for 8:49 p.m. Students will also have access to optional seating in the Georgia World Congress Center Staging area of the Georgia Dome for the Louisville-Wichita State semifinal, set to tip off at 6:09 p.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAttendees will pick up their tickets in Atlanta. Students must have an SU or State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry ID that matches the name on the credit card used to purchase the tickets.Otto’s Army held a meeting Tuesday night at 9 p.m. in Maxwell Auditorium to confirm travel and hospitality plans. Commentslast_img read more