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South Korean governor opposes plans to keep local coal plants open

first_imgSouth Korean governor opposes plans to keep local coal plants open FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Chosun Ilbo:South Chungcheong Province, which is home to around half of Korea’s coal-fired power plants, is committed to phasing out the heavily polluting power source, even as the central government wants to hike coal power production to make up for its nuclear phaseout.South Chungcheong Province Governor Yang Seung-jo, who is affiliated with the ruling Minjoo Party, told the Chosun Ilbo on Wednesday, “We need to halt steps to extend the lifespan of aging coal-fired plants” since that would worsen already alarming air pollution.Boryeong, Dangjin, Seocheon and Taean in South Chungcheong Province are home to 30 out of Korea’s 61 coal-fired power plants. Two plants in Boryeong are more than 30 years old and 10 others were built over two decades ago.The governor believes the health of locals is at risk from the emission from these aging plants. “The amount of atmospheric pollution in the province is the highest in the country at 280,000 tons as of 2015,” Yang said. Yang added that decades-old plants must be shut down and transformed into eco-friendly power plants.The state-run Korea Development Institute claims refurbishing the plants could extend their lifespan by another 10 years to 2041. The cost of refurbishment is estimated at W1.51 trillion (US$1=W1,130).More: South Chungcheong governor resists gov’t’s coal power planslast_img read more

Column: Andretti digs deep to honor family at Indianapolis

first_img Associated Press Television News SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT LIVE TV First Published: 18th August, 2020 10:17 IST FOLLOW UScenter_img Last Updated: 18th August, 2020 10:17 IST Column: Andretti Digs Deep To Honor Family At Indianapolis Fresh off one of the biggest moments of his career, Marco Andretti headed to St. Elmo’s Steakhouse for a small celebration with friends and teammates WATCH US LIVE Fresh off one of the biggest moments of his career, Marco Andretti headed to St. Elmo’s Steakhouse for a small celebration with friends and teammates.Another diner at the Indianapolis landmark said, “Go get ‘em Marco” as he passed by their table. His guests raised a glass to Andretti for “laying down a fat one” in a tribute to the late Dan Wheldon, who used that expression to describe big qualifying laps.Andretti did just that, seizing the first Indianapolis 500 pole in 33 years for motorsports’ most famous family . His grandfather, Mario, won the last Andretti pole at Indianapolis Motor Speedway when Marco was just two months old.Earning the right to lead the field to green in “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” is a worthy resume highlight in itself. But what Andretti did will forever be a defining moment for a beleaguered driver.Three of his Andretti Autosport teammates had failed to show the speed the team knows is in the cars and five-time IndyCar champion Scott Dixon had just topped the leaderboard. Andretti was the final driver to qualify. It was hot and a slight wind swirled around the empty speedway, conditions that should have slowed his effort.With a confidence he has struggled to show in recent years, Andretti ripped four laps around the 2.5-mile oval — wide-open on the gas, fast and fearless in pursuit of his own moment of glory at Indy.“On the last lap, I knew it was either all or nothing,” Andretti told The Associated Press on Monday at the speedway in the shadow of its famed Pagoda. “I was either not going to finish or the run was going to be very good. I had to dig deep for that, reach for the next level.”His run was wildly celebrated by his fellow competitors — even Dixon said he was rooting for Andretti — as well as his celebrity friends. He counts comedian Kevin Hart and entertainers Ludacris and Ice-T as close friends; he took a congratulatory call from “Ice while we were on the way to dinner.”“He’s such a great guy and a good friend,” Dixon said. “To see him get a pole position at Indianapolis — I know what that means to him and especially his family.”Indianapolis Motor Speedway is the Andretti family playground. Mario Andretti won the Indy 500 only once, in 1969, and five Andrettis are a combined 1-for-74 when it comes to winning the most important race on the IndyCar calendar every year. It’s earned the family the notorious “Andretti Curse,” which Marco insists they don’t believe is real.“We don’t believe in it as a family,” he told AP. “We’ve been really blessed around here and we are unscathed as far as being in race cars. This is a dangerous thing we do and we are all healthy. It’s hard to say we’re cursed. This place can bury your confidence and it can also make you.”Now 33, Marco has been at Indy his whole life and his favorite memories, he said, were days spent at the old Speedway Motel turning laps on the balcony on a toy car as his grandfather, father, uncle and cousin fine-tuned their race cars.He wants nothing more than to break that so-called curse, which began for him as a rookie in 2006 when Sam Hornish Jr. passed him right before the finish line. Marco finished second, his father Michael finished third and it was the first of 14 consecutive years of Indy 500 heartbreak for Marco.He is not over that loss, bitterly noting that 15 years later he is still defending why he was so angry in defeat. The race that hurts the most was actually last year when he ran a tribute 50th anniversary paint scheme of his grandfather’s win, a time-consuming effort that his sister tirelessly put together. Radical changes made to his car were a disaster and Andretti plummeted to the back of the field at the start of the race. He finished 26th, his worst finish in 10 years.“I mean it was just, it was a nightmare. It was totally embarrassing,” Andretti said. “It’s one of those times where I was wanted to crawl under a rock.”Andretti recognizes that his statistics — two wins in 240 starts over 15 seasons, his last victory way back in 2011 — open him to criticism. Fans have mocked his lack of success, accused him of keeping his job only because his dad owns the team and suggested he’s not worthy of a seat in IndyCar.It used to bother him. But Andretti has grown up in this series; he was just 19 his rookie year and teammates with series greats Dario Franchitti, Tony Kanaan and Bryan Herta, who now calls his races. He has learned to stop worrying about the chatter.Now he’s a favorite to win the race that means everything to his family, an enormous amount of pressure that could potentially mentally drain Andretti before Sunday’s race. To clear his head, he planned to head to a family cabin in the Pocono mountains before he’s returns to the track Friday.“It’s just about being chill and trying to not stress,” Andretti said. “I can do that there because it’s an all-wood log cabin and you get there and it’s like everything’s cool, everything is going to be alright.”Image credits: AP Written Bylast_img read more

World Boxing Championships: Amit Panghal, Manish Kaushik Aim for History in Semis

first_imgEkaterinburg: India would be aiming to better their best ever show when Amit Panghal (52kg) and Manish Kaushik (63kg) step inside the ring against tough opponents in pursuit of summit berths in the World Men’s Boxing Championship here, on Friday.India have never had two semifinalists at the marquee event for amateur boxers and in that respect, the two Haryana boxers have already scripted history. But if both or either of them manages to make the finals, it would be a gigantic step forward for the sport in the country.The task, however, is easier said than done.Panghal has in his way Kazakhstan’s Saken Bibossinov, who stunned Armenia’s European gold-medallist and sixth seed Artur Hovhannisyan in the quarterfinals.Kaushik, on the other hand, faces the most accomplished boxer in his weight category — Cuban top seed Andy Gomez Cruz, who out-punched Russia’s eighth-seeded Ilia Popov in the last-eight stage.Cruz, who was the light welterweight (64kg) gold-medallist in the 2017 edition, is also a two-time Pan American Games gold-winner and not to mention, a terrific mover inside the ring.”Now begins the tough job. We have already delivered on bettering the medal count and now we aim to better their colour,” Indian Boxing’s High Performance Director Santiago Nieva told PTI.”I am happy but I won’t be completely happy till the time both of them reach the finals and they surely can, both of them,” added the country’s chief coach C A Kuttappa.They are up against tough challengers but that in no way makes them automatic underdogs.Panghal, the pint-sized dynamo from Rohtak, is the reigning Asian Games and Championships gold-medallist and has back-to-back gold medals at one of Europe’s oldest tournament — the Strandja Memorial.Kaushik, the shy man hailing from the cradle of Indian boxing Bhiwani, is a Commonwealth Games gold-medallist and is a two-time national medal winner.Both are employed with the Indian Army and both have shown a soldier’s grit in some draining bouts so far.”He (Bibossinov) has a long reach but I think I have the strategy to beat him,” said Panghal after the quarterfinal triumph.Panghal didn’t go into the details but so far, he has delivered each time he has promised. In fact, it was at the world championships when Panghal first caught everyone’s attention.In the 2017 edition, he nearly took down the then defending champion Hasanboy Dusmatov in the quarters but lost by the most slender of margins. The Indian got his revenge a year later in the Asian Games final, where a gold catapulted him to star status in Indian boxing.Kaushik has had a stop-start career so far. He first hit the headlines when he took down 2015 world bronze-winner and three-time Asian medallist Shiva Thapa in the national championship finals.That victory opened the doors of the senior national camp for him and he has been locked in a neck-and neck battle for a place in the side with Thapa ever since. So, while the CWG slot went to him, Thapa took the Asian Games last year.”I think I have moved slightly ahead because I don’t just have a world medal like him but also a CWG medal which Shiva bhai doesn’t have. That has taken a lot of pressure off me,” Kaushik told PTI.”As for tomorrow, I have seen the videos of my opponent. No doubt he is a good boxer but there is nothing in his game that I cannot do better,” he added.Before this year, India had never won more than one bronze medal in a single edition of the world championship.The overall medal count for the country before the ongoing edition stood at four bronze medals, claimed by Vijender Singh (2009), Vikas Krishan (2011), Shiva Thapa (2015) and Gaurav Bidhuri (2017). Amit PanghalboxingIndiaIndian Boxing First Published: September 19, 2019, 1:25 PM IST Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more