Blogs

Chart of the Week: DC overtakes DB in top seven pension markets

first_imgDB and DC assets (%)Chart MakerIn the Netherlands, the proportion of DC assets remained at 6%, the same as in the 2017 report. DC assets in the UK decreased from 19% to 18% last year, largely as a result of a recalculation by the country’s Office for National Statistics.Total assetsDC capital grew by 7.6% a year on average over the past 20 years, while DB assets averaged just 3.2% a year.Combined pension assets of the world’s 22 largest markets dropped 3.3% to €35.6trn last year, the report said.Dutch assets fell from €1.42trn to €1.35trn, while the UK’s combined assets declined from €3.11trn to €2.53trn.Although Dutch pension assets as a proportion of GDP fell from 193.8% to 167%, this was still the highest ratio of the 22 surveyed countries.The UK saw its pension assets relative to GDP decrease from 121.3% to 101.7% last year, while Switzerland’s ratio was 126%.At €21.9trn, the US was the largest of the surveyed pension markets.Asset allocationThe study also showed that the Netherlands, the UK and Japan had an above-average allocation to bonds.Dutch and UK fixed income investments amounted to 54% and 53% of assets, respectively, while Japan’s bond allocation was 60%.Swiss pension funds had the highest exposure to alternatives, with 31%.Top seven markets’ averageasset allocation (%)Chart MakerCommenting the study results last year, Jacco Heemskerk, Willis Towers Watson’s head of investment in the Netherlands, argued that the conservative investment policy of Dutch pensions funds was eroding the purchasing power of their participants. Defined contribution (DC) pension funds have more assets than defined benefit (DB) funds across the world’s seven biggest pension markets, according to Willis Towers Watson’s Thinking Ahead Institute.The institute’s Global Pension Assets Study analysed data from 22 of the largest pension markets. The top seven – Australia, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the UK and the US – accounted for 91% of assets covered by the report.Across those seven countries, DC assets were estimated to be “slightly over 50%” of total pension assets, the Thinking Ahead Institute reported – although this was primarily as a result of the dominance of DC in the US, the world’s biggest pension market by assets.Australia and the US were predominantly DC markets, but Japan and Canada were “showing an increasing allocation towards DC”, the institute said.last_img read more

Irish provinces on the road in Pro12

first_imgA win for Pat Lam’s side would see them take over the top-spot in the table ahead of Ulster’s game tomorrow.Kick-off is at half-past four. Leinster are in Wales to face the Cardiff Blues at the Arms Park in a 3 o’clock kick-off.The province have restored a host of Irish internationals to their starting side for the game with the likes of Eoin Reddan, Ian Madigan and Fergus McFadden all coming back into the team after international duty.Also this afternoon, Connacht will be looking to continue their impressive run of form as they travel to Italy to take-on Zebre.last_img read more

If Joe Pavelski signs elsewhere, Sharks will miss more than just goals, assists

first_imgSAN JOSE — Joe Pavelski meets with the Dallas Stars, who seem ready to take the next step after nearly beating the eventual Stanley Cup champion St. Louis Blues in the second round of the playoffs.Pavelski is then seen in Tampa Bay, looking comfortable as he talks with Lightning general manager Julien Brisebois and coach Jon Cooper, who, no doubt, want to find that missing ingredient after they were swept in the first round.The possibility of Pavelski leaving San Jose for another franchise …last_img read more

Record-Setting Cosmic Structures Challenge Big Bang

first_imgHow will big bang theorists deal with the latest news?First there was the Great Wall. Then there was the Sloan Great Wall, and a supercluster system dubbed Laniakea. “But the newly spotted BOSS Great Wall, with a total mass perhaps 10,000 times as great as the Milky Way, is two-thirds bigger again than either of them,” New Scientist reports today about a billion-light-year galactic “wall” that may be the largest object observed in the cosmos so far.Galaxy superclusters also have competition for the “biggest known object” crown. Some distant light sources like quasars or gamma ray bursts seem to be clustered together in certain regions of the sky. If they are truly connected, they belong to structures so large that current cosmological theories can’t explain them.To be fair, the classification is subjective. Some astronomers think the material in the structures are not physically linked. If nothing else, though, they illustrate the lumpiness problem in cosmology. The universe is not a smooth sea of particles as theory would predict. Instead, “On the grandest scales, the universe resembles a cosmic web of matter surrounding empty voids – and these walls are the thickest threads.”Far OutPeering deep into space, a new “cosmic distance record” was set by the Hubble Space Telescope, reports the BBC News. A galaxy with redshift z=11.1 has been observed. It’s called GN-z11. Its high redshift would put its origin 13.4 billion years before the present in standard cosmology, a mere 400 million years after the big bang. The very first stars might become observable. “They are probably another 200 million light-years beyond even GN-z11.”Dr Oesch and colleagues say GN-z11 is one-25th the size of the Milky Way with just 1% of our galaxy’s mass in stars.“The surprising thing is how bright it is (for what it represents), and it’s growing really fast, producing stars at a much faster rate,” said the Yale astronomer.“So, it’s challenging some of our models, but it’s showing galaxy build-up was well under way early on in the Universe, and it’s a great preview for [the] James Webb [Space Telescope], which will be pushing even deeper to see the progenitors of this galaxy.”The James Webb Telescope may be able to see redshifts between 15 and 30, indicating objects only 100 to 250 million years after the big bang. Science Daily explains where GN-z11 needs to fit in current theory:“The previous record-holder was seen in the middle of the epoch when starlight from primordial galaxies was beginning to heat and lift a fog of cold, hydrogen gas,” explains co-author Rychard Bouwens from the University of Leiden, the Netherlands. “This transitional period is known as the reionisation era. GN-z11 is observed 150 million years earlier, near the very beginning of this transition in the evolution of the Universe.”A galaxy of stars this mature so close to the beginning of the universe was not predicted by big bangers, Space.com says:However, the discovery also raises many new questions as the existence of such a bright and large galaxy is not predicted by theory. “It’s amazing that a galaxy so massive existed only 200 million to 300 million years after the very first stars started to form. It takes really fast growth, producing stars at a huge rate, to have formed a galaxy that is a billion solar masses so soon,” explains Garth Illingworth of the University of California, Santa Cruz.Marijn Franx, a member of the team from the University of Leiden highlights: “The discovery of GN-z11 was a great surprise to us, as our earlier work had suggested that such bright galaxies should not exist so early in the Universe.” His colleague Ivo Labbe adds: “The discovery of GN-z11 showed us that our knowledge about the early Universe is still very restricted. How GN-z11 was created remains somewhat of a mystery for now. Probably we are seeing the first generations of stars forming around black holes.”If this trend continues, the James Webb telescope may push theory to the breaking point after it launches in 2018.A piece on PhysOrg states, “The early universe consisted almost entirely of hydrogen atoms, but at some point – probably about 500 million years after the Big Bang – the first stars formed.” Something is dreadfully wrong here. One cannot have a galaxy turning up 100 million years earlier than the first stars. Maybe the new physics theory announced by PhysOrg will rewrite the textbooks. Readers may wish to see why a Caltech astronomer found something “frustrating, but interesting” about the first galaxies. “For a while we were convinced that we were missing something important,” he said on PhysOrg, but then he and his colleagues were “shocked” when theory matched his prediction. It must be a rare occurrence.Other cosmologists, like those on Science Daily, will continue to speak glibly about the leading theory that posits “a region of space the size of a single proton vastly expanded to form the beginnings of our universe” in a fraction of a second. Somehow, the article says, the universe learned how to make French onion soup from that sudden explosive beginning.Let’s recap. The big bangers did not predict this galaxy or the BOSS Great Wall. They were amazed. It was a great surprise. The GN-z11 galaxy should not exist, but it does. The big bangers admit that their knowledge about the early Universe is still very restricted, after decades of research. Such objects are a mystery to them. Their cosmological theories cannot explain them. And yet they get to keep their jobs? Sounds like government workers. (Visited 102 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Mining history for new solutions

first_img13 October 2010 These are great days to be a South Africa-based multinational company. If nothing else, the 2010 Fifa World Cup shone a light on our ability to host a successful world-class sporting event – and demonstrated the achievements made in 16 years of democracy. I have lived and worked out of Johannesburg for the last three years, after 30 years’ business experience across 25 countries and five continents. This allows me to appreciate what those who haven’t had the opportunity to work in South Africa cannot, and what some local business leaders also find difficult to grasp.Legacy of apartheid Yes, South Africa has problems. With its history, how could it be otherwise? Most citizens are concerned about crime, even though it seems to be on the decrease. But in my experience people are even more concerned about our future direction, particularly opportunities for their children. A system built during apartheid for the support of a 10% minority will invariably struggle as it gears to provide for the majority, without depriving the previously advantaged. This is both a herculean and sensitive pathway for us to navigate. Undoing the apartheid legacy is still a subject of debate. The solution must be in repairing the damage in a way that supports relatively strong economic growth, so as to eradicate widespread race-based poverty, the ultimate consequence of apartheid. Growth strategies require complex trade-offs and value judgments.Passionate debate The remarkable thing is how South Africans have gone about grappling with these difficult questions. No country debates its policy issues more passionately. So, for example, when the ruling African National Congress’s youth league calls for the nationalisation of mines, the response from their seniors is cool, considered and rational, while also conscious that sensible solutions to deep, racially-based economic inequalities are needed. Indeed, the mining industry itself is encouraged to participate in these debates, even though it is seen as having colluded in the apartheid system. Much of 2010 has seen rigorous engagement between the government, the established mining sector, organised labour and emerging black mining businesses seeking better paths to transformation while recognising their common interest in the sector’s profitability and growth. That process is not complete, but there are signs that a balance will be found, continuing the country’s happy culture of constructive internal engagement developed in the 20 years since political parties were unbanned and political prisoners such as Nelson Mandela released.Political support The political support for the mining industry is as good as anything I have seen anywhere. Contrast, for example, the South African government’s decision to delay a new mining royalty regime because of the global financial crisis, with the punitive tax laws passed by the Australian government. Similarly, political support for mining in the US is somewhat more fragmented than in South Africa. Yes, the government is taking an increasingly tough line on safety and the environment. But that is their job, and these are areas where the industry has work to do. There have been one or two worrying regulatory decisions on mineral rights, but we are not unlike many jurisdictions where those with the best lawyer benefit from weaknesses in legislation. The key is that we recognise and correct our weaknesses – this has been our history. The nature of conversations between business and trade unions is also refreshing. While unions sound uncompromising to the unfamiliar ear, the focus is invariably on finding solutions to issues in which we have common interests, such as occupational safety. Even wage negotiations, while tough, are aimed at finding mutually acceptable solutions. These conversations are far more difficult in “developed” jurisdictions. South Africa is remarkable in its ability to innovate from within. It is the only country to successfully stage three major global sporting events – the cricket, rugby and soccer world cups. To be so consistently successful points to more than luck. Mark Cutifani is CEO of the multinational AngloGold Ashanti mining company. This article was first published in South Africa Now, a six-page supplement to the Washington Post produced on behalf of Brand South Africa. Download South Africa Now (PDF, 2.12 MB).last_img read more

Piracy decline gives Somalis hope

first_imgSuspected pirates keep their hands in the air as directed by the guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf as the visit, board, search and seizure team prepares to apprehend them. Vella Gulf is the flagship for Combined Task Force 151, a multi-national task force conducting counterpiracy operations to detect and deter piracy in and around the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea.(Image: Jason R Zalasky, US Navy) MEDIA CONTACTS • Obinna Anyadike  Editor-in-Chief, Irin  +254 20 7622 1343 RELATED ARTICLES • Co-operating to cut down piracy • Maritime piracy under the spotlight • Eye in the sky benefits society • SA women marine pilots make history • SA Agulhas in historic polar tripSource: Irin NewsRusting hulks of capsized boats decorate the waters around Berbera, a port city in the self-declared republic of Somaliland. Further down Somalia’s coast, pirates raid freighters in the Gulf of Aden. But efforts are under way to help Somalis make better use of their 3 300km coastline – the longest on the African continent – by increasing fishing and seafood exports to lucrative markets in the Middle East and Europe.In 2013, the EU will spend US$6.5-million (R57-million) to help Somaliland pursue its long-term goal of netting 120 000 tons of seafood each year, the sale of which could generate $1.2 billion (R10.5-billion) in foreign currency.“In Somalia, people have lived for a long time with their backs to the sea,” says Isabel Faria de Almedia, the EU development chief for Somalia. “It’s a country of agro-pastoralists with a strong nomadic tradition. We think there is a huge potential for the consumption and export of fish.”Until the second half of the 20th century, few Somalis outside fishing communities consumed fish and the sector was entirely artisanal in nature. This began to change in the 1970s with the development of better cold-storage facilities and the creation, with Soviet help, of an industrial fleet.But for want of spare parts and maintenance, these vessels quickly fell into disuse. See here for a detailed, if slightly dated, overview of the Somali fishing industry. Luring pirates away from piracyIn the middle of the last decade, Somali fishermen complained they were being forced into piracy by foreign trawlers operating illegally in waters claimed by Somalia.Coastal Somalis recount as a “eureka” moment the time self-appointed coastguards impounded a foreign trawler and levied a fine on its owners; they quickly realized seizing vessels was more lucrative than competing with commercial vessels for dwindling fish stocks.Amina Farah Arshe, who employs 40 fishermen aboard 11 vessels from Berbera, the main port of Somaliland, says fishing revenues could provide an alternative to raiding freighters far into the Indian Ocean.“We can stop it by empowering the people. We can stop it by giving jobs to the youth. People would make money, the government would collect tax revenues, and piracy would diminish,” she said. “But we need support. We need training, boats, fishing gear and cold storage.”For years, the UN has said that tackling Somali piracy should involve creating work for the jobless young Somalis who board skiffs, armed with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, to hunt vessels on the high seas.But only now has the security situation made this a realistic possibility. Somalia has recently selected its most viable president and government in years. Somali and AU forces have driven Al-Shabab insurgents from major cities.Out at sea, foreign warships and on-deck private security guards deter piracy. Only 70 raids took place in the first nine months of 2012, compared to 199 in the same period last year, according to the International Maritime Bureau. Logistical challengeSomalia’s new president, Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, says he wants to “increase local food production to end poverty forever”. Some 2.1-million people in the country are faced with hunger, particularly in the turbulent south.The future of large-scale fishing in Somali waters is tied up in a legal dispute over how far these waters extend from the country’s coastline.While the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which Somalia ratified in 1989, establishes 12 nautical miles from shore as an international norm for states’ territorial waters, Somalia has asserted sovereignty over seas up to 200 nautical miles from the coast. Mogadishu has resisted international pressure to declare these outer waters an exclusive economic zone, a designation that confers numerous rights to the country but falls short of full sovereignty.Alan Cole, who runs anti-piracy operations for the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, says Somaliland’s Berbera and Puntland’s Bosaso have real potential. But exporting fresh fish from the remote central coast – site of many pirate bases – offers a “logistical challenge”, he said.The UN agency spends $40-million (R351-million) each year tackling piracy, helping prosecute sea-borne raiders, training and equipping coastguards, creating jobs, and providing refrigerated trucks and storerooms to the fishing industry.“We need to get the fishing fleets of Somalia back to sea,” Cole said. “One of the challenges for fisherman is that the pirates will steal your fish. So you come back to the same issue of needing wider maritime security for Somalia so that the fishermen can safely make their living at sea.”last_img read more

Government condemns mine violence

first_img20 February 2013 The South African government says it is saddened by the acts of violence that erupted at Anglo American Platinum’s Siphumelele mine in Rustenburg, North West province on Monday. This comes after 13 people were injured in a conflict which is believed to have flared up because of rivalry between workers’ unions. “Every South African has the right to freedom of association which, amongst other things, entitles workers to form and join unions and/or federations of their choice in order to promote common interests,” Government Communications (GCIS) said in a statement on Tuesday. “Workers have common issues that require them to act in unison. Such acts of intolerance and violence can only serve to weaken them when taking up genuine issues against their employers.” Acting GCIS CEO Phumla Williams said that while the government acknowledged individuals’ right of association, it would not tolerate violent disputes. “We urge the union leadership to act decisively and play a proactive role in curbing acts of violence; importantly, in guiding their members towards the common goals that unite them.” Williams stressed that the government wanted all parties involved to engage in discussions and resolve issues in a “peaceful and amicable” manner, and for all South Africans to promote a violence-free society. Earlier on Tuesday, North West Premier Thandi Modise called for an urgent dispute resolution intervention to prevent further violence in the mining sector in the province. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

South African school science project takes on maize toxins

first_img21 April 2016Two CT Matrics have discovered low-cost ways to reduce the amount of mycotoxin in maize – they will save many lives! pic.twitter.com/jGlDI5Xtrd— Julia Joubert (@JulzJoubert) April 19, 2016Two matric learners from Khayelitsha, Kholiswa Ntshinga and Yolanda Nkala, have discovered a low-cost way to reduce the amount of mycotoxin-producing fungi in maize.Mycotoxin poisoning can damage the human nervous system as well as cause growth stunting in children and cancers, in particular liver and oesophageal.During their initial field research, studying the crops of subsistence farmers in rural Eastern Cape, the learners found that the maize, which is grown without the use of pesticides, showed dangerous levels of mycotoxins. They also found cases of oesophageal cancer in residents who drank traditional maize beer contaminated with the toxin. Maize is the staple food of residents in the area, as well as thousands of people across the country who grow their own crops.Using their research, the learners developed a preliminary process that theoretically could remove the toxins more easily and closer to the source of the food. While details of the process are still being verified by biologists, it has already drawn the attention of some of the country’s leading experts in the field.Wentzel Gelderblom, director of the Institute of Biomedical and Microbial Biotechnology at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, said their research could definitely help save many lives.“These young girls are brilliant. They are now part of a global scientific community that is finding ways to eliminate human exposure to mycotoxins and we need more of that,” Gelderblom told TimesLive.In addition to winning two South Africa science prizes, the Expo for Young Scientists and Eskom’s International Science Fair, the two learners were also selected to submit their findings to the Beijing International Science Fair earlier this year, where they won silver medals in the medicines category and a special award for innovation in agriculture.Nkala was selected as one of Mail and Guardian’s 200 Young South Africans 2015 for her continuing work in agriculture science and app development. Ntshinga is currently studying program coding at Code4Africa.Source: South African Expo for Young Scientistslast_img read more

How to conquer your creative blocks

first_img3. Fear of failure  We all know the feeling. You’re staring at the Geocaching map, viewing the perfect spot to place a geocache, and waiting for that light bulb moment of cache creativity…but it just doesn’t seem to come. You’ve hit a creative block.  Try anyway because nothing is a failure if you’ve learned from it. To not ever try means never learning or improving, which can end up damaging your creative juices. Even if your first idea (or tenth) doesn’t work, you’ll know more than you did when you started and you can create something new (and even better) with that gained knowledge. In the end, these lessons will only make your geocache hide better, stronger, and ready for those Favorite points! It’s a common scenario, and not exclusive to the geocaching world—but you don’t need to be defeated by it. In fact, you can use these barriers to inspiration as a tool to think outside the box (ammo can?) and create something new! Here are three common causes of creative blocks and how to overcome them. Have you experienced a creative block when trying to think of a new hide? Share how you overcame this barrier to create an awesome cache!Share with your Friends:More 2. Doubting yourselfcenter_img 1. Routine on repeat  Doing the same things day in, day out often means you end up thinking the same thoughts. So mix things up! Try finding cache types you don’t normally gravitate towards, try caching in a new area, or attend an Event to meet other geocache hiders and finders. You might just find inspiration for your geocache around the next smiley!  The best way to silence self-doubt is to overcome it with action. Go ahead and try your ideas out! It’s always a good idea to make sure your geocache is weather-proof and working properly and there’s no better way to find out how it performs than building it and testing it out. The more challenges you face, the more you’ll have to employ creative thinking to work your way around them, and the more creative you’ll be!  SharePrint RelatedGeocache Icon Run: find the most cache types in one dayApril 19, 2018In “Community”Padlocks, RFID chips, and secret briefcases: an interview with a geocaching maniacMarch 12, 2019In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”A geocacher’s secrets to making New Year’s resolutions stickDecember 22, 2016In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”last_img read more

Why More Women in the Board Room is Essential to Innovation

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Related Posts I did not think of the very obvious when writing a post yesterday about Jive Software’s new members to its board of directors.The men Jive chose are all talented, intelligent and well-respected people. They have risen to the top of their fields. But where are the women?Jive is not an uncommon example. But the lack of women board members does point to a problem that companies need to address. For the companies that do, there could be advantages that they never expected.Why It Makes Sense to Have More Women Board MembersFor reference, German companies have adopted a voluntary initiative due to the poor representation of women in board seats. In 2010 only 2.2% of executive board members at Germany’s 30 Dax companies were women, according to data from DIW, the German Institute for Economic Research, which the Financial Times refers to in its post about the German initiative. Women held about15% of board seats at Fortune 500 companiesin 2010, according to Catalyst, a nonprofit membership organization that expands opportunities for women in business.Is it an obvious question to ask why there are so few women board members? Perhaps it is more enlightening to ask why it makes sense to have women on the board.But first let’s consider some of the reasons why women are absent from board positions.Rachel Happe writes in a blog post that the the startup world’s go-go-go nature and the resemblance to frat boy culture is an environment where women do not necessarily want to lead. In the same post, Happe writes about the success of women who graduate from women’s colleges, which is evident in their spots on board of directors. The problem is there are so few women graduating from women’s colleges. That seems like it is part of the issue, too.Judy Rosener wrote a post two years ago that still rings true today. Most CEOs are men. And most do not seek out women for the job. They seek people like themselves. What they need to do is get out there and look. If they do that, you can bet there will be women in board-of-director roles.But what are some of the reasons to have women on your board? Rosener distills it down to this:Good business sense means taking into consideration the following: knowledge of the labor pool; knowledge of new and growing markets; interest in improving corporate governance; and the tracking of revenue and profit, i.e. attention to the bottom line.Let’s look at each of these reasons.Labor Pool: Women are more than half of the workforce. Doesn’t it make sense that they should be represented on the board of directors, too? To exclude women from the board can mean that the company may not be seen as a place that welcomes women at all. In turn, that has a direct effect on the company’s competitiveness.The Market: Women are decision makers. Women have a perspective that can alter the development of a product or a service. They manage the finances in the home. They make the purchases. Put women in executive roles and board positions and you can see how their perspectives may open new markets.Governance: A woman joining a board of directors can have an effect on the men. They will be less likely to make sexist remarks and jokes. But there is more to this. Rosener writes: I asked Shirley M. Hufstedler, an experienced corporate board member, how she thinks the presence of women changes a board. Hufstedler served for many years on both the Hewlett-Packard and US West boards, and currently sits on the Harman International Industries board. She said it is her observation that female board members usually understand, better than men, how to appeal to women as consumers and as employees. “Also, because women are acculturated differently from men, they tend to listen more and see problems and solutions differently from their male colleagues.” In many ways this expands and enhances board discussion and deliberation. Bottom Line: Companies with more women in executive positions tend to have higher profits. She writes:A study by Roy Adler, a professor at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, tracked 215 Fortune 500 companies, comparing their financial performance to industry medians. He found that “companies that smash the glass ceiling also enjoy higher profits.” In a recent Harvard Business Review article presenting his findings, Adler showed that “the companies with the highest percentages of female executives delivered earnings far in excess of the median for other large firms in their industries.” The Canadian Conference Board findings support those of Adler. It tracked the financial well being of firms with two or more women on their boards in 1995 to see where they stood six years later. It found that firms with women board members were much more likely than companies with all-male boards to be leaders when ranked by revenue or profit. While these two studies do not a theory make, they suggest there is a relationship between the presence of women on boards and financial performance.Considering that why would a company not have a women on its board? 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now alex williamscenter_img Tags:#Analysis#enterprise#NYT IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

Lyceum, San Beda top groups as PCCL Final Four is set

first_imgClint Doliguez led the steamrolling with 12 points, 10 coming in the first quarter to set the tone for the beatdown.Calvin Oftana chipped in 12 points and had six boards and Radge Tongco got nine to make up for the absence of Robert Bolick, who had to be subbed out after suffering a minor knee injury early in the tussle.San Beda will face Ateneo in the other duel in the crossover semifinals.Mark Alcala paced La Salle with 12 points as La Salle, bannered by Team B players, exited the tournament winless.In the other game, University of Visayas gained some sense of pride after an 85-82 victory over Naga College Foundation.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 93 PLAY LIST 02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9300:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Balkman, Brownlee lead Alab past CLS Knights for 7th straight win LA SALLE 35 — Alcala 12, Yang 8, Cu 7, Souka 5, Lapena 3, Dominguez 0, Yongco 0, Tan 0, Angeles 0, De Robles 0, Calleja 0.Quarters: 18-7, 42-18, 62-29, 79-35.Third Game:LYCEUM 69 — Perez 19, Nzeusseu 19, Jc. Marcelino 15, Ayaay 4, Jv. Marcelino 3, Santos 3, Tansingco 2, Ibanes 2, Serrano 2, Caduyac 0, Cinco 0.ATENEO 65 — Wong 10, Black 9, Ravena 7, Maagdemberg 6, White 5, Ma. Nieto 5, Navarro 5, Mi. Nieto 4, Verano 3, Mamuyac 3, Mallillin 2, Go 2, Andrade 1, Tio 0, Asistio 0.Quarters: 16-20, 34-36, 49-52, 69-65. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting View comments Mike Nzeusseu finished off an and-one play with 1:54 remaining to tilt the favor to the Pirates’ side before CJ Perez cashed in on his freebies to make it, 65-62, with 19 seconds to go.The Cameroonian Nzeusseu delivered a double-double of 19 points and 21 rebounds, while Perez got 19 markers, five boards, and four steals. Jaycee Marcelino added 15.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAdrian Wong was the lone bright spot for Ateneo with 10 points.Meanwhile, the Red Lions hardly broke a sweat as they destroyed the winless Green Archers with a 79-35 humiliation. AFP official booed out of forum NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Rey Suerte dropped 30 points, but more importantly, dished the go-ahead assist to Michael Maestre with 14.4 seconds to spare as the Green Lancers completed their comeback from 13 points down.Liberian Bassieru Sakor unloaded a double-double with his 13 markers and 13 rebounds to give the Cesafi champion its lone win in the tournament.Jaymar Allarey carried the Tigers with 16 points in the loss.The scores:First Game:UV 85 — Suerte 30, Sakor 13, Delator 8, Segumlan 8, Maestre 6, Gahi 5, Cabahug 5, Balabag 3, Soliva 1, Hassan 0, Albina 0, Butohan 0.NCF 82 — Allarey 16, Ojoula 13, Margallo 10, Lapinid 10, Hermonio 8, Magpantay 6, Lawas 6, Olayvar 3 Mangubat 3, Padua 0.Quarters: 17-26, 30-43, 59-59, 85-82.Second Game:SAN BEDA 79 — Doliguez 12, Oftana 12, Tongco 9, Tankoua 8, Noah 8, Cariño 6, Ejercito 5, Cabanag 4, Penuela 4, Bahio 4, Mocon 3, Abuda 2, Adamos 2, Bolick 0, Presbitero 0. Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLyceum outsteadied Ateneo down the stretch while San Beda romped La Salle as the two NCAA topped their respective groups in the Philippine Collegiate Champions League Elite Eight Sunday at the Ynares Sports Arena.The Pirates eked out a 69-65 win to sweep their group at 3-0 and draw San Sebastian in the crossover semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Read Nextlast_img read more

Tigresses lead BVR tournament Ilocos leg champs

first_imgLOOK: Vhong Navarro’s romantic posts spark speculations he’s marrying longtime GF View comments The winning pairs of each division received P50,000 with the runnersup getting P30,000 in the event sponsored by Nestea, Smart, NLEX/SCTEX, Rebisco, PSC, and the local government of Currimao, among others. Organizers of the BVR on Tour’s seventh leg of its summer series, led by Former Ateneo stalwarts Charo Soriano and Bea Tan, also held a volleyball clinic for young enthusiasts in Ilocos Norte as part of the group’s “Sandroots” advocacy. The program aims to promote volleyball at the grassroots level by holding clinics at every stop of the tournament.“We want to be able to give the kids a chance to learn from the best coaches that we have in beach volleyball,” said Soriano. “The kids who joined were super amazing.“What we really appreciated was the kids who joined the two-hour ‘sandroots’ workshop,” said Tan. “In the end, it’s really about teaching and sharing the passion we have one province at a timADVERTISEMENT Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend ‘Coming Home For Christmas’ is the holiday movie you’ve been waiting for, here’s why Lakers win 9th straight, hold off Pelicans In the men’s university division, Malaysians Mohd Aizzat Zorki and Raja Nazmi Hussin turned back Far Easter University, 21-14, 21-18, to emerge champions in the event that has the Inquirer as media partner. “This leg had indeed the most competitive lineup of teams for the men’s division,” said BVR founder Charo Soriano. “We had teams from Malaysia and HongKong and they showcased their world-class athleticism in the shores of Currimao against our local talent.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting“The great thing about the BVR on Tour is we have tournaments every month so teams don’t get too down when they lose,” said Bea Tan, also one of the BVR’s founders.Cebu’s Jade Becaldo and Rommel Pepito, meanwhile, gutted their way out of an opening set loss before turning back Hong Kong’s Giovanni Musillo and Brian Nordberg, 18-21, 21-14, 23-21, to top the men’s open class. Mourinho relishes United’s ‘victory of pragmatism’ Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletescenter_img MOST READ South Korea to suspend 25% of coal plants to fight pollution Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES UST’s Cherry Rondina gets one over San Beda’s defense in Beach Volleyball Republic in Ilocos. Contributed Photo.Traditional UAAP powerhouse University of Santo Tomas turned back San Beda, 21-12,21-14, over the weekend to rule the Beach Volleyball Republic on Tour women’s university division in Playa Tropical Currimao, Ilocos Norte. Tigresses Cherry Rondina and Ma. Cecilia Bangad defeated the Red Lioness’ pair of Iza and Ella Viray for the title. ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: PH beats Indonesia, enters gold medal round in polo More than 5,000 measles deaths in DR Congo this year — WHOlast_img read more

Maybe I’ll go bald for a film, says Priyanka Chopra

first_imgPriyanka Chopra, who has managed to pull off different looks in her over decade-long movie career, has sported a bald look for her forthcoming film “Mary Kom”. The actress, who didn’t actually shave off her head, says she may consider going bald if an entire film requires her to do so.For “Mary Kom”, which releases Sep 5, the requirement was only for a scene.”It was just about one scene in ‘Mary Kom’, so it was not required for me to go bald. Then who would have shot the rest of the film? But if a film requires for me to go bald entirely, maybe I will do it. But just for one or two scenes, I can’t go bald,” Priyanka said here.She has sported a bald look for her forthcoming film Mary Kom.”Mary Kom” is a biopic on boxing champion M.C. Mary Kom, who fought all odds to pursue her passion.Talking about the film, which marks the directorial debut of Omung Kumar, Priyanka said: “When Omung came me to me with this film, I was quite sure I want to do it. I knew Omung for many years and besides this film was being made (co-produced) by Sanjay Leela Bhansali.”There was a comfort zone and Omung and Sanjay gave me confidence. It’s an incredible story,” she said.last_img read more