first_img“We must change the perception that persons have about the capability of public health nurses. You must be the agents of change for the benefit of all … patients must leave satisfied.”UG Vice Chancellor, Professor Ivelaw GriffithThis was the charge delivered by Advisor to the Public Health Minister, John Adams to the 27 nurses graduating from the University of Guyana’s Bachelor of Science Nursing Programme. Adams was speaking at the annual award ceremony hosted at the Pegasus Hotel on Sunday evening.He told the nurses that as agents of change, they must educate others in order to make a difference within the public health sector. This, he noted, will involve a willingness on their part to continue to build their own capacity as they strive for excellence as health-care professionals.“That step will not only benefit you, but boost the Ministry of Public Health and the country, as a whole … It will bring you on par with your colleagues in the Caribbean since qualifying yourself in the various health fields will certainly aid Guyana in achieving Goal 3 of SDGs [Sustainable Development Goals] – ensuring a healthy life and well-being for all. The acquisition of these skills will surely benefit you and the country, once it is utilised properly,” he is quoted as saying by the DPI.Chief Nursing Officer at the Ministry, Linda Johnson, said the award ceremony speaks volumes for those who have graduated.“It is indeed an undeniable fact that the progress of any health-care system is through the development of nurses via higher education. Globally, nurses are the centre of almost every health-care team and they make an enormous contribution to the health of any nation … as graduates that emerge with a degree in nursing, your experience and added knowledge are valued assets,” Johnson said.The Chief Nursing Officer also charged the nurses to map out and develop new approaches to nursing care, health promotion and disease prevention. She advised them to secure leadership role opportunities within the sector in order to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have learnt.In his remarks, UG Vice Chancellor, Professor Ivelaw Griffith encouraged the nurses to embrace the values of respect, integrity and excellence and to be exemplars of all three attributes.last_img read more

first_imgAfter months of complaintsAfter numerous complaints were lodged about the difficulties being faced to traverse hinterland roads, contractors were finally mobilised to begin rehabilitative works.The state of hinterland roadsIn a recent engagement, Natural Resources Minister, Raphael Trotman made this announcement, having identified that the prolonged rainy season amplified challenges to manoeuvre along the dreadful thoroughfares.“We have seen some hinterland roads or forest roads suffering some deterioration. I’m advised…that we have seen a prolonged wet season and more intense rainfall which has proven to be challenging for us,” he said.The Natural Resources Minister had established a partnership with the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) and Public Infrastructure Ministry to share responsibility for the maintenance of hinterland roads. Presently, works have already commenced in a few areas.“Some road works have commenced. Certainly, contractors have been mobilised. GGMC, Ministry of Natural Resources and the Ministry of Public Infrastructure are now sharing responsibility for hinterland roads.”In June, the regional administration of Region Eight (Potaro-Siparuni) had embarked on rehabilitative works on the Linden-Lethem trail after citing similar issues.Mayor of Lethem, David Adams had informed that the remedial activities had brought significant relief to the road users who have been suffering in the recent months.Road users, particularly minibus operators plying the trail were complaining of the deteriorated condition of the trail which had become almost impassable. Mayor Adams had said that no major works could be done on the trail during the rainy weather. During this season, extra attention needed to be paid to the trail between Mahdia and Mabura, which was in dire need of repair works.The minibus operators had lamented the deteriorating condition of the trail which they are forced to use to transport passengers and goods as a means of earning their daily bread.They described the trail as a “death trap” and bashed the Public Infrastructure Ministry for paying zero interest in conducting long-term repairs to that trail which is the only access to those areas. Those minibus operators were forced to park their buses for a period of time.Further, when they resumed work, they were unable to get into the mining town with their buses and as such, were forced to take passengers up to a point on the trail and then transfer those passengers and goods and other items to All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and pick-up trucks. These were able to get through the silt and into the mining town.This arrangement persisted for several weeks but resulted in hardships on those passengers and business owners who had to offset the double cost to reach into the mining town. Residents were also facing hardships as businesses were forced to inflate prices to offset the transportation cost and as such, they had to pay higher prices for goods.last_img read more