first_imgThe president of the Central Bank of Liberia Staff Association (CEBSA) has assured his colleagues that every member’s voice will be heard at all times as long as he stands to serve as their president and with adequate support from them (the workers).Mr. D. Bouleigh Cooper said though effective communication is not easy, but he will do all he can in his power to ensure that cordial working relationship exists between the workers’ association and the CBL administration.The president of CEBSA made the statement on Saturday, January 18, at the induction ceremony of his leadership in Monrovia.He acknowledges that though there has been some level of cooperation between the administrations and the workers of the bank, but he wants to take that (working relation) to another new dimensions.CEBSA president indicated that his administration will continue to expand and improve a good working relationship with the administration in seeking the common welfare of the CBL as well as it employees.Mr. Cooper, who is also the sixth sitting president of CEBSA used the occasion to appeal to the CBL management to ensure that incentives that will motivate staff to do more for the entity should paramount.The Central Bank of Liberia workers’ union president reminded his colleagues that CBL was “all” they have.“We need to take our jobs seriously, professionally that will reflect the signal and loyalty to our bosses,” Cooper told CBL employees.According to him, there are much to put on the table (creating a vibrant working environment for staff, administration) than to receive.Also speaking at the program, the managing director of Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC), T. Nelson Willaims, II, urged the leadership of CEBSA to be focused and committed to their job.Serving as installing officer, the LPRC boss said to serve is not easy but with commitment and transparency CEBSA can improve the entity (CBL).Mr. Williams urged the executives of CEBSA to be a good leaders; adding: “You must be a good servant to the people.”He further acknowledged them to be steadfast in seeking the welfare of their members.For his part, Leroy Z. B. Nuah, former president of CEBSA, who gave the overview of the association said that during the time of the National Bank of Liberia, it was then called “National Bank Social and Athletic club” (NBSAC).According to the president emeritus of CEBSA, NBL Social and Athletic club in collaboration with the management of the Bank held year-end beach party, where each year employees from various departments were honored for most dedicated, most hard working and most punctual employees of the Bank.He said following the establishment of the CBL, there was no organization that could represent the voices of the staff as it was done at NBL, until July 2004, when the late Executive Governor, Charles E. Green, thought it wise to re-establish the social club at present day CBL.Adding that the sole purpose of the club was to bring together staff during happy and sad moments and also advocate for them.Meanwhile, the first election of CEBSA was held in 2004, 2007 second election and third election in 2013, which brought Copper and his administration into power. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgSeveral education marketing groups, including the Education Market Association, have found that roughly 99.5 percent of all public-school teachers and administrators use their own money to prepare their classrooms each year – when both state funding and parental contributions fall short. At an estimated cost per teacher of more than $400 per year, an increased number of educators now utilize nationwide donation sites, to buffer the costs.Schools in the District are no exception. A tour through DonorsChoose.org, which allows people to donate supplies to schools, shows teachers from both D.C. public and charter schools requesting materials ranging from personal hygiene products to books, laptops and drumsticks. “My students need toothbrushes, soap, and deodorant for personal use. In the classroom, we want to remain clean and healthy as well with the wipes, hand sanitizers, and tissues,” a request from Charles Drew Elementary School teacher Ms. O said.Another solicitation, from Mrs. Yarborough of Cesar Chavez Public Charter School in Northwest D.C. said: ‘My students need 60 copies of ‘Between the World and Me’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates.” According to the post, the book is the first book in her 9th grade class’ study of the Modern Black Experience in America.”As the school year begins, it is unclear how many requests will be successfully answered. At the root of the budget crisis, The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities noted at least 30 states paid less per student in school funding in 2014 than they did in 2008. Further, by mid-2012, local school districts had cut 351,000 jobs – with 297,000 jobs remaining unfilled. The result, the study concluded, was “more teachers digging more deeply into their pockets than ever before, and that’s before the school year has even begun.”Jacqueline Freeman, a retired DCPS teacher told the AFRO that parents are increasingly being asked to supply things to classrooms that the school used to provide. When coupled with an already tightened budget at home and deepened cuts within the school, teachers often feel obligated to make up the cost difference themselves.“There were friends of mine who worked in major corporations, who agreed to photocopy materials we needed because there were not enough books budgeted, others donated supplies so that my students would not be shortchanged by a lack of materials,” Freeman, who retired in 2010 told the AFRO. “It has gotten progressively worse, because now I am hearing that classrooms are coming up short for things like mats for the kids’ naps.”Staples offers a classroom registry, of sorts, that allows teachers to list the materials they require, and then promote those items to the public through their StaplesForStudents.org campaign each year. While the ire of some D.C. residents was raised at the thought of teachers having to pay for or solicit material donations, others told the AFRO that the donation sites bring needed attention to how city funds are being spent and how neighbors can help.“I just moved here as a single person with no children, but I would gladly help support our local schools with whatever they need,” Ward 7 resident Eric Taylor told the AFRO. “I had no idea schools were dealing with this sort of thing . . . it means that as a community, we need to do our due diligence and help our students and educators as much as possible.”In May, according to the Washington Post, the D.C. Council’s Committee on Education voted to raise per-pupil spending to 2.38 percent, which is more than a percentage point below the 3.5 percent increase recommended by education advocates.last_img read more