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Protests over George Floyd’s death expose raw race relations worldwide

first_img“If you want to believe that we in the Netherlands do not have a problem with race, you should go ahead and go home,” Jennifer Tosch, founder of Black Heritage Amsterdam Tours, told a crowd in Amsterdam, from where the Dutch West India Company operated ships estimated to have traded 500,000 slaves in the 1600s and 1700s.Tosch and others drew a comparison between Floyd’s death and the treatment of slaves centuries ago. “We have seen this image before as white persecutors and enslavers held down the enslaved and branded them with an iron.”In London, a protester held a placard reading “The UK isn’t innocent,” while in Berlin around 2,000 people protested outside the US embassy and two Bundesliga soccer players wore “Justice for George Floyd” shirts on Monday.A similar message came from Dominique Sopo, president of French NGO SOS Racisme, which organized a small protest outside the US embassy in Paris on Monday. Topics : “This issue of police racism is also, albeit with a lower level of violence, an issue that concerns France,” he said.Police in northern Paris fired tear gas on Tuesday to disperse demonstrators protesting over the 2016 death of a young black Frenchman in police custody – an incident that has drawn parallels with Floyd’s killing.Adama Traore’s family have blamed excessive force used during his arrest, when the 24-year-old was pinned down by three gendarmes. Successive pathology reports have reached conflicting conclusions over whether his death two hours later resulted from asphyxiation or other factors including pre-existing conditions.Amid a coronavirus lockdown, French activists also say there have been a number of police brutality cases in low-income neighborhoods where many originate from Africa.Clashes in turkeyIn Istanbul, more than 50 people clashed with police officers minutes after beginning a protest over Floyd and what they called police brutality in Turkey.At least five people were detained after scuffles with officers holding shields, after which other protesters gave speeches denouncing lethal police force and bans on demonstrations in Turkey during the pandemic.In Nairobi, protesters at the American embassy held signs reading “Black Lives Matter” and “Stop Extrajudicial Killings”.Organizer Nafula Wafula said violence against blacks is international and cited the killing of prisoners in Kenya.“The system that allows police brutality to happen in Kenya is based on class. In America, it’s race and class.”Protests are planned in coming days in Gambia, Britain, Spain and Portugal.In Spain, protesters will mark the death of Floyd and “all sisters and brothers who have died at the hands of institutional racism on our streets,” the African and Afro-descendant Community CNAAE said.Portugal’s gathering will address “the myth that Portugal is not a racist country”.But not all in Europe side with the protesters.Spain’s far-right Vox party and the Netherlands’ anti-Islam Freedom Party called those protesting Floyd’s death “terrorists” and backed US President Donald Trump.”Our support for Trump and the Americans who are seeing their Nation attacked by street terrorists backed by progressive millionaires,” Vox wrote in a Tweet.In the Netherlands, the Freedom Party’s Geert Wilders tweeted: “White House under attack. This is no protest but anarchy by #AntifaTerrorists.”Even amid such racial division, Linda Nooitmeer, who heads the National Institute for the Study of Dutch Slavery and its Legacy, drew hope from Monday’s protest in Amsterdam.”We don’t have the history of the civil rights movement in Holland, so what occurred yesterday was really something new. It is the start of real dialogue.” center_img Images of a white police officer kneeling on the neck of African-American George Floyd, who then died, have sparked protests from Amsterdam to Nairobi, but they also expose deeper grievances among demonstrators over strained race relations in their own countries.With violent clashes between protesters and authorities raging in the United States, anti-police-brutality activists gathered by the thousands in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in various European and African cities.Peaceful protesters highlighted allegations of abuse of black prisoners by their jailers, social and economic inequality, and institutional racism lingering from the colonial pasts of the Netherlands, Britain and France.last_img read more

Chelsea deny Cole taunted Man City

first_imgChelsea insist Ashley Cole did not taunt Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini or his players after Monday’s game at Stamford Bridge.Cole was reported to have sparked a tunnel bust-up following Chelsea’s 2-1 victory by mocking City for recently failing to reach the knockout stage of the Champions League.He was said to have shouted: “Thursday nights, Channel 5” towards Mancini after the match.AdChoices广告But a statement issued by Chelsea on behalf of Cole read: “Contrary to reports, Ashley Cole did not say anything to the opposition in the tunnel after Monday’s game.“Ashley has huge respect for the players and staff at Manchester City, many of whom he knows personally and calls friends.”Follow West London Sport on Twitterlast_img read more

Dishing and Swishing: NBA is perfect platform for social justice

first_imgHowever, the players in the bubble have made it well known that they are playing for more than just the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy. Players are motivated beyond their drive to win. They’re playing for justice. All of this has raised the following questions for some: Do we even need sports at all right now? Should successful athletes speak on pertinent issues unrelated to sports while on the court? Should we even mix sports and social justice initiatives together? It’s also hard to fathom why people think it’s okay to watch, bet on and root for Black athletes on the court but not support them as Black people off the court, as Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell said in a tweet in June. What I really want to say with this column, though, is that sports not only brings people together, but as we are witnessing perhaps most prominently with the NBA, sports can be used as a vehicle to spread awareness and support social justice initiatives. The main thing that the NBA Players Association wanted during negotiations on the NBA restart with regard to social justice was to have the players’ voices heard not for publicity reasons but because they knew that their high-profile stature will make fans listen to their words. Kneeling spreads awareness. Speaking out during press conferences — like Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart did in July — spreads awareness. Sending out tweets calling for change spreads awareness. One of my favorite things about sports is that it can always bring people together. The pandemic and social justice movement have revealed deep-rooted ideological differences in the public sphere. Our country has arguably become more divided than it has ever been before. Sports, on the other hand, is nonpartisan: You don’t have to belong to a certain political party to shoot some hoops or watch basketball. Team sports, especially, are all about communication, cooperation, teamwork and perseverance. Amid the chaos of 2020 — including the way-too-long sports shutdown — the NBA restart at Walt Disney World has been so exciting and fast-paced that each game feels like March Madness. Each team is playing with so much energy, it’s like their seasons were never even suspended in the first place. These comments cannot be more insular. Numbers don’t lie: Black men are 2.5 times as likely to be shot and killed by police than their white counterparts. The killings of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and most recently the shooting of Jacob Blake have reignited the Black Lives Matter movement that has been prioritized by the NBA and its players this season more than virtually any in the league’s history. So when athletes like James make such comments, they are making them from the perspective of a Black person in the United States, period. Wealth does not change one’s race. The argument that Black athletes are somehow immune to police brutality due to the size of their pockets is invalid.  The answers: Yes, yes and yes. Since the beginning of the NBA restart, I’ve seen a lot of posts about players advocating for the Black Lives Matter movement on my Instagram feed. But within the comment sections of these posts, I’ve seen a lot more hate toward these athletes for speaking out against racial injustice. Many of these comments have to do with the notion that it doesn’t make sense for NBA players to say that they’re “scared as Black men” in this country — like LeBron James said Monday night — since they are high-profile, wealthy athletes, and that victims of police shootings “should have just complied” with the officers at the scene to avoid violence. “BLACK LIVES MATTER” is printed above center court each game and players have messages such as “Equality” and “Peace” written above their jersey numbers and on their sneakers. The subject of many postgame press conferences has been diverted away from basketball entirely and toward the pressing issue of racial injustice in this country. Although my New York Knicks are (unsurprisingly) not competing in the playoffs right now and I’m not rooting for any team in particular to be crowned this tumultuous season’s champion, I find it extremely important to hear what NBA players have to say about the recent shooting of Blake, who was shot in the back seven times by a police officer in Kenosha, Wis. in front of his own children. After all, they have the platform — and they have all the right in the world — to make a difference. Shawn Farhadian is a sophomore writing about sports. His column, “Dishing and Swishing,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

Lakers receive permission from Golden State to interview Luke Walton

first_imgWalton quickly became an attractive option for a few reasons. He has strong ties with the Lakers as a former reserve (2004-12). Walton also guided the defending NBA champion Warriors to a 39-4 record this season as interim coach while head coach Steve Kerr recovered from offseason back surgery. During the 2011 NBA lockout, Walton also served as an assistant coach at the University of Memphis. Once his 10-year NBA career ended after the 2012-13 season with the Cleveland Cavaliers, Walton became a player development coach for the Lakers’ Development League affiliate, the D-Fenders. That soon parlayed into a position as an assistant coach with the Warriors once Kerr became the head coach in 2014-15. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The Lakers are completing the beginning steps of their coaching search by pursuing someone both familiar by name and intriguing by potential.The Golden State Warriors have granted the Lakers permission to interview assistant Luke Walton on Wednesday once their first-round series ends against the Houston Rockets. Later that evening, the Warriors accomplished just that. That makes Walton’s schedule relatively more flexible before Golden State faces the winner of the Clippers-Portland first-round series. With Portland leading that series 3-2, the Warriors would face the Trail Blazers on Sunday if they close out their series in Game 6 on Friday. If the Clippers force a Game 7 on Sunday, the Warriors would face the winner on May 3. Golden State generally allows its assistants to interview for head-coaching positions even before the NBA playoffs end so long as it does not interfere with their current job. For example, the New Orleans Pelicans were granted permission to interview former Warriors assistant Alvin Gentry in mid May last year before the Warriors’ eventual title run. last_img read more