first_img Pushing myself She added: “I am looking forward to an exciting 2016.” Shot-putter O’Dayne Richards, who twice hit a national record – 21.69m – on his way to winning Pan American gold and a historic World Championships bronze, was presented with the runner-up to the Sportsman of the Year Award. World Championships 100m hurdles gold-medal winner Danielle Williams who clocked a personal best 12.57 for gold in the event in Beijing last summer was runner-up to the Sportswoman of the Year. The People’s Choice Award for Performance of the Year went to Jamaica’s senior women’s 4x400m relay team. Novlene Williams-Mills, who anchored Jamaica to the gold medal in the World Championships 4x400m and who has successfully fought off breast cancer, was recognised with the Chairman’s Award. Former Netball Jamaica president Marva Bernard was honoured with the Lifetime Achievement Award. Newly crowned RJR Sports Foundation National Sportsman and Sportswoman of 2015, Usain Bolt and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, say winning the prestigious title means a lot to them, adding they will be looking to represent Jamaica well, and seek more global success this year. The RJR Sports Foundation’s annual awards ceremony was held at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel last Friday night. Bolt won his sixth Sportsman of the Year award, after copping titles in 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013, while Fraser-Pryce, who also won in 2012 and 2013, lifted her third Sportswoman of the Year title. Last year, Bolt returned from an injury-plagued start to the season to dominate the men’s sprints at the IAAF World Championships. He won gold medals in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m in Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Stadium where he had previously set world records in the 100 and 200 metres. “Six-time athlete of the year in Jamaica is always an honour,” Bolt told reporters. Personal best He pointed out that he is looking forward to a stress-free year, but was mindful of the demands ahead. “It’s just about trying to stay focused this year and staying on top of things and making sure everything runs smoothly … pushing myself, but also being aware of everything that is going on around me,” he added. Meanwhile, Fraser-Pryce, the three-time Sportswoman of the Year, also received the Sagicor Iconic Award at the function. The MVP Track Club star won gold medals in the 100m and 4x100m at last year’s World Championships in Beijing, China, as well as copping the Diamond League 100m title. “I am feeling blessed and I am feeling honoured,” she said. “For me winning an award is a signal that you did something right in 2015, and I am really honoured and blessed and grateful to be able to collect a third Sportswoman of the Year Award here,” Fraser-Pryce said.last_img read more

first_imgThough visitors to Phil’s Supermarket can’t actually buy groceries, they can guide their avatars (online parlance for a user’s digital personification) through the store to explore products, watch cooking demos and see the latest food and health news. The idea is to help people navigate the real world of food by letting them preview a store, accessing nutritional data and other information on various products, seeing a showcase of just-launched items or scoring coupons. “The average consumer only spends 22 minutes food shopping,” said Lempert, who launched the site Monday. “That’s not a whole lot of time to see new products. But what I hear from consumers is that they want to hear about what’s new and exciting.” Lempert expects to have 100,000 products on the site by the end of summer. Visitors can “taste” many of the products, then offer reviews. How meaningful those reviews are, of course, depend on whether users have tried the product in the analog world. Beyond wanting to know more about their food, consumers also want to know more about its safety. On display this week are products such as G & K Services’ line of ProSura clothing. Intended for food service workers such as meat cutters and chefs, these clothes are like hand sanitizer you can wear. Though the clothing resembles the white cotton garments common to butcher shops and professional kitchens, ProSura products have chlorine chemically bonded to the fibers, claiming to kill microbes that touch them. G & K marketing manager Christine Fischer says that for many companies this level of sanitation probably isn’t necessary, but they see it as a way of demonstrating to customers that they are willing to spend extra to ensure the safety of their food. And spending on sanitation might be smart money. According to a Harris Poll Online released Monday by FMI, just 66 percent of consumers feel at least somewhat confident in the safety of supermarket food, down from 82 percent in 2006. The food industry has been hit by a number of recent food safety problems, including E. coli in spinach and melamine contamination of pet food and animal feed. FMI spokesman Bill Greer says the study reflects that. So business could boom for companies such as PureCart, which makes a sort of disinfecting carwash for shopping carts. But despite consumer concerns, PureCart president Jim Kratowicz says products such as his still have a tough sell. Consumers want clean carts, but companies worry about sending the wrong message. “What are grocers telling me? They’re telling me they have dirty carts,” he said about the message consumers may imagine.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CHICAGO – Standing in a long line at the grocery store soon might get you through the checkout faster. That’s because a British company has designed a system to track and predict the movements of supermarket shoppers using thermal imaging. A computer tracks data from infrared cameras, then immediately advises when and where additional cashiers are needed. “The idea is that the more pleasant the checkout experience, the more you will buy,” said Nick Stogdale, senior sales manager for InfraRed Integrated Systems’ Smartlane product. The system is being tested by two U.S. chains. Smartlane was one of many new food-related technologies on display at this week’s Food Marketing Institute show, where speed, ease, sanitation and a touch of theater ruled. Take the case of rotisserie chicken, one of the most popular items in the fast-growing prepared foods category: The latest crop of chicken roasters – those ubiquitous ovens that endlessly twirl crisp, golden chickens at stores across the nation – are designed not just to cook, but also to capture your attention with good looks and funky design. Hence, the Multisserie, an upright, clear, cylindrical oven by Netherlands-based Fri-Jado that spins the chickens on end, like a giant top. “We try to bring a very high show element to it,” marketing director Ernst Goettsch said Sunday. The same thinking also influenced the design of Montreal-based Hardt’s Inferno Rotisserie, which offers a crowd-pleasing self-cleaning function that looks like a sprinkler gone wild. “The more a supermarket can do to create a show or to create a restaurant-style experience, the more sales they make,” said Michael Griffin, a vice president of sales for Hardt. For those who prefer their food slightly pixelated, food industry analyst Phil Lempert has teamed with Kraft Foods and the National Grocers Association to launch a virtual supermarket in the online fantasy world known as Second Life. last_img read more