Blogs

Lecture compares theology and anthropology

first_imgNotre Dame professor of theology Celia Deane-Drummond discussed the interconnections between theology and anthropology in her presentation “Evolution, Humans and Other Animals: Theology and Anthropology in Dialogue,” an installment of the Snite Museum’s Saturday Scholars series.Drummond discussed the attempts of anthropology and theology to explore the role of human agency and human interaction with the environment. She said the main concern with both fields is how they intersect in light of new discoveries in evolutionary biology.According to Drummond, both anthropology and theology need to create stronger dialogue in order to provide greater perspective regarding human nature and human agency.“I believe there are tensions here that need to be faced, and if we refuse to face them we end up merging the two areas [theology and anthropology] in a way that is not necessarily intellectually responsible,” she said.Drummond said anthropology’s focus on human and human interaction with the environment compliments theology’s focus on humanity’s relationship and identity to God.In exploring the different dimensions of human biology and human evolution, Drummond explained their relation to our actions toward our environment and our role in history. She discussed how studies centered on human-animal interaction shape both human and animal communities, and she said these studies compel theologians to expand their worldview of the human relationship to God.“Although anthropologists can describe what’s going on in these [human] communities and give us a sense of our entanglement with other creatures, how are we to think about our own human responsibility that might be in the context of such entanglement?” she said. “What is the goal of the human from a theological point of view?”Drummond  introduced the concept of “theo-drama,” a concept developed by Catholic Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar, which establishes God as a central actor in human interaction and views history in light of the “future hope.” Drummond defined theo-dramatics as the “performative understanding of who we are as humans.”Theo-dramatics is analogous to niche construction, the way in which humans shape and interact with their environment, Drummond said. The theo-dramatic view of humanity and human history provide a unique integration of theology and anthropology, she said.“[Theo-dramatics] replaces the kind of stale defensiveness between evolution and creationism that has been the mantra of so much public discourse,” she said. “It’s doing something different; it’s doing something creative by actually drawing on the science and using it in a way that is helpful.”Drummond said both anthropology and theology have created frameworks that allow people to understand their identity toward both their environment and God.“There are family resemblances between the way theologians construct their work and the way that scientists can think about our own human identity,” she said. “If we’re in touch with how the biological world works, it will actually illuminate our theology in new ways.”Tags: anthropology, Celia Deane-Drummond, Saturday Scholars, theo-drama, Theologylast_img read more

Georgia 4-H pumpkin-growing contest

first_imgMore than 25 pumpkins were submitted to Georgia 4-H’s 2020 statewide pumpkin-growing contest, with the largest pumpkin, cultivated in north Georgia’s Union County, weighing in at a whopping 548 pounds.All Georgia 4-H youth were encouraged to participate by submitting one pumpkin for consideration. Participants took their entries to their local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office for weighing. This year, the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association sponsored the contest, donating prize money of $100 for first place, $50 for second place and $25 for third place.The winners of the 2020 Georgia 4-H Pumpkin Growing Contest are:Peyton Collins, Union County, 548 poundsNatalie Payne, Union County, 432 poundsAva Sharp, Union County, 316 poundsGeorgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 242,000 people annually through UGA Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org.last_img read more

Men’s Hockey: Sitting down with star freshman Alex Turcotte

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s ice hockey team (7-10-1, 2-7-1-1 Big Ten) is having a rough go at the dish lately, losing in several underwhelming performances. Despite having a record under .500, they remain one of the nation’s top and most exciting programs. Part of this success? Wisconsin’s highly-recruited freshman center, Alex Turcotte.Turcotte was drafted with the fifth overall pick in the 2019 National Hockey League Entry Draft by the Los Angeles Kings and stands as the third-highest selected Badger in the NHL Draft in school history.Men’s Hockey: Badgers NHL draftees set to take off in freshman seasonFollowing an NHL Draft that featured four Badgers, the University of Wisconsin squad is loaded with young talent. Alex Turcotte, Read…The 5-foot-11, left-handed, 180-pound centerman from Island Lake, Illinois, has had a terrific freshman season through 14 games, scoring over a point-per-game on average. He is a top contributer for the Badgers in points (15), goals (6), assists (9) and powerplay goals (4).He was one of four Badgers to be drafted in the 2019 NHL Draft, others being freshmen Cole Caufield, Owen Lindmark and Ryder Donovan. These four have all played together on different U.S. National teams prior to this season. Turcotte described how going to school, practicing and playing with these three has created a tight bond between them.“That’s where we became best friends,” Turcotte said. “Having that encouragement has been great and it’s like another support piece. You get to lean on guys like that because you’re going through the same thing as them, so it’s been great.”While his friends and teammates have been extremely supportive of him, nothing has served as more of a support piece to Turcotte than his dad, Alfie Turcotte, who was drafted 17th overall in the 1983 NHL Entry Draft by the Montreal Canadiens.Alex discussed his feeling on being drafted twelve spots higher than Alfie.“He’d always kind of chirp me about it,” Alex said. “It was all fun and games, so I kind of jab him back a little bit now.”Even with some playful jabs, the relationship between the two is purely loving.Turcotte was enthusiastic about the amount of support his father has given him, as it has helped him become the player and man he is today.“I’m here and I am who I am today because of him,” Turcotte said of his father. “He’s definitely been the biggest influence in my life on and off the ice, so he’s been a great supporting piece.”Alex has had a tremendous impact on the Badgers’ offensive success this season, but it is not just him carrying the load. Wisconsin’s freshmen as a whole have been the glue of the team and have had an enormous impact on the season thus far.Turcotte pointed out how, despite the team’s youth, most of the players are used to playing against older competition.“A lot of us [freshmen] played juniors, so we played against older guys when we were younger than them, so we kind of have some of that experience,” Turcotte said. “It’s still a big adjustment. Even from the USA team to here … we can always improve and definitely have a lot of things to work on.”Another adjustment for Turcotte has been playing in front of a larger crowd at the Kohl Center as opposed to playing in front of the crowd at the U.S. National team games. Yet, this has been a relatively smooth transition for him despite the daunting nature of the task.Men’s hockey: Wisconsin’s overloaded 2019-20 freshmen class is its best in yearsThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team recently landed a surplus of talent in their 2019 freshman class. The incoming Read…Though Turcotte has had a great experience playing for the Badgers this season, his decision to play came as a result of choosing not to play for the Kings. This was a huge decision for someone who has been surrounded by hockey his entire life.His reasoning, however, was not related to avoiding his inevitable leap to play professional hockey, but rather because of his relationships with current Badger teammates. “Just the guys that are here, a lot are really great teammates, and going with Cole and Owen — it was an easy decision,” Turcotte said. Even with this decision, Turcotte is aware that his NHL jump is looming, and he acknowledged that getting stronger and more prepared for the NHL is a major factor on his mind. Moving forward, improvements can come in numerous ways for Turcotte. This means improving his goal scoring, shooting and 200-foot game in order to bring these attributes to Los Angeles, where there already lies an elite 200-foot centerman and one of Turcotte’s favorite players, Anže Kopitar.“As far as goal scoring goes, just scoring from different areas on the ice, but using my shot more,” Turcotte said. “I’m more of a playmaker, so I think using my shot can be a dual threat. I know what I can do offensively, but I think you want to be out there in all situations, and in order to do that, you need to have a good 200-foot game.”To develop his 200-foot game, Turcotte strives to be more relied on defensively, and to improve his faceoff percentage.Men’s Hockey: Inconsistencies continue to plague Wisconsin against MinnesotaThe No. 19 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (6-7-1, 1-4-1-1 Big Ten) struggled immensely against the University of Minnesota Read…His ability to develop as a player has changed drastically over time, as he had to find ways to succeed against players who were much bigger, stronger and older. “When you’re a kid, it’s a lot more separated on talent and you can kind of get away with it if you are more talented, but then ever since the U.S. teams and college … there’s not that much of a difference from each player,” Turcotte said.The sudden even playing field has caused Turcotte to work much harder than he ever had before.Turcotte explained that playing in college has required an adjustment period, but he feels that the high level of competition is crucial to his career.“I think just working hard and trying to get better every day can really go a long way because there’s not much separation from guys,” Turcotte said. “Everyone’s a lot older and physically more mature, and, especially in college, there’s 25-year-olds. That’s crazy. I’m 18, so playing against guys that are way older, I can only help and see how much of a physical advantage they have, but you have to adapt, and it can only make you better.”Men’s Hockey: Crease Creatures craziest student section in hockeyThe No. 7 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (4-2-0, 0-0-0 Big Ten) has impressed in a major way through Read…Next time you’re at a Badger hockey game, watch out for No. 15 on the ice, as he may be an NHL star in the making.last_img read more

From the Editors: This section isn’t your escape

first_imgWe’re in the middle of a monthslong pandemic that is now hitting Southern California hard. If not done strategically and with health at the absolute forefront of decision making, playing any sport this fall will put not just the health of student-athletes, coaches and team personnel at risk but also that of the surrounding South Central community. Universities across the country are not incubated from the neighborhoods that surround them, meaning every NCAA-affiliated event carried out carelessly could endanger residents whether they are fans or not.   At the same time, it is evident that this brand is part of a flawed system reflecting the plague of systemic racism so deeply ingrained in our society. The student-athletes that make college sports function are using their platforms to say as much — and we should listen. The NCAA has long been known as an organization that exploits its student-athletes by reeling in hundreds of millions of dollars for predominantly white administrators, commissioners, athletic directors and coaches without directing a dime of that money toward the student-athletes generating its revenue. This dynamic is especially prevalent in college football and basketball — sports that make the most money and comprise the highest percentage of Black student-athletes. The Black Lives Matter movement has firmly ingrained itself in athletics, and that cannot and should not be undone. The work begun by Colin Kaepernick and carried on by Eric Reid, LeBron James and countless others has made a profound impact on sports, and athletes on both the professional and collegiate stage are continuing that today.   Note: This article was written prior to the postponement of Pac-12 sports through 2020. It’s our responsibility to tell these stories. It’s our responsibility to highlight and celebrate the achievements of Black student-athletes, both on and off the field, that are too often taken for granted. It’s our responsibility as journalists at USC to shed light on how college sports are not a vacuum outside of society but rather part of an inherently unequal hierarchical system. We know that USC Athletics is a major aspect of campus life for students, identity for alumni and pride for fans. USC Athletics is a brand, one that plays a central role to so many members of the University community. The term “Trojan Family” is perhaps best on display amid the backdrop of USC sports, and that’s a reality we don’t take lightly. The Daily Trojan is a completely independent, student-run platform, and it is our job to provide a voice to our local community and student body. This means increasing profiles that highlight the achievements and contributions on and off the field of the Black student-athletes in our community, dedicating ourselves to covering social justice issues within USC Athletics and the wider world of sports and holding the Athletic Department accountable to follow through with its initiatives to fight for racial justice both within Trojan athletics and beyond. We want to look at the big picture when reporting on our student-athletes. All of us love sports, but that doesn’t mean the system providing us with such rich and entertaining moments is or has ever been anything close to perfect. The student-athletes who make you proud to call yourself a Trojan are reckoning with a sporting landscape that doesn’t prioritize their equity.  Tradition is everything to USC, but change is demanded for a reason. These are just some of the many ways we can and must listen to the voices — especially those of color — in our community and help do our part in effecting lasting, tangible change.  College athletes have said as much. A group of Pac-12 football players wrote a letter in the Players’ Tribune Aug. 2 stating they will opt out of the 2020 season if the NCAA does not remedy these shortcomings. Student-athletes at USC formed the United Black Student-Athletes Association in June to demand that the Athletic Department better support its Black student-athletes and actively fight racial injustice. center_img Statues of USC’s 1969 defensive line, known as “The Wild Bunch,” cast a shadow outside of Heritage Hall. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) There is a multitude of questions regarding whether fall sports will be played this year. Administrators are forced to consider not just the economic necessity and logistical feasibility of safely carrying out a 2020 season but also the ethics of taking such a risk in the first place.  Tailgating? Wouldn’t bet on it. Fans in the stadiums? Unlikely. Games taking place at all? Far too early to tell, but there’s no guarantee — no matter what the schedule says.  This is a moment when we must collectively understand that acknowledging systemic injustice without actively working to dismantle it is simply not enough. So, until we’re all told there won’t be college sports this semester, the Daily Trojan sports team will continue to bring you as close to your typical fan experience as we can with the resources available to us, even if much of that work will be done remotely. Now, to add on, student-athletes are having to fight for uniform coronavirus prevention protocols and medical coverage from the NCAA during a pandemic that disproportionately affects the Black community. This is our promise to reflect these complex truths in our reporting. This is our promise to improve upon our regrettable lack of diversity among our staff and our columnists to uplift the voices that we have historically undercovered. In just about every way, this won’t be a normal semester for anyone in the USC community. Athletics are no exception, and that’s not just because the football schedule will exclude Notre Dame for the first time since World War II. Most people across the sporting landscape have concerns about the feasibility of safely carrying out a fall sports season. Almost all are hoping there’s a way to make it happen. Both statements apply to us. last_img read more