first_imgThe president of the Central Bank of Liberia Staff Association (CEBSA) has assured his colleagues that every member’s voice will be heard at all times as long as he stands to serve as their president and with adequate support from them (the workers).Mr. D. Bouleigh Cooper said though effective communication is not easy, but he will do all he can in his power to ensure that cordial working relationship exists between the workers’ association and the CBL administration.The president of CEBSA made the statement on Saturday, January 18, at the induction ceremony of his leadership in Monrovia.He acknowledges that though there has been some level of cooperation between the administrations and the workers of the bank, but he wants to take that (working relation) to another new dimensions.CEBSA president indicated that his administration will continue to expand and improve a good working relationship with the administration in seeking the common welfare of the CBL as well as it employees.Mr. Cooper, who is also the sixth sitting president of CEBSA used the occasion to appeal to the CBL management to ensure that incentives that will motivate staff to do more for the entity should paramount.The Central Bank of Liberia workers’ union president reminded his colleagues that CBL was “all” they have.“We need to take our jobs seriously, professionally that will reflect the signal and loyalty to our bosses,” Cooper told CBL employees.According to him, there are much to put on the table (creating a vibrant working environment for staff, administration) than to receive.Also speaking at the program, the managing director of Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC), T. Nelson Willaims, II, urged the leadership of CEBSA to be focused and committed to their job.Serving as installing officer, the LPRC boss said to serve is not easy but with commitment and transparency CEBSA can improve the entity (CBL).Mr. Williams urged the executives of CEBSA to be a good leaders; adding: “You must be a good servant to the people.”He further acknowledged them to be steadfast in seeking the welfare of their members.For his part, Leroy Z. B. Nuah, former president of CEBSA, who gave the overview of the association said that during the time of the National Bank of Liberia, it was then called “National Bank Social and Athletic club” (NBSAC).According to the president emeritus of CEBSA, NBL Social and Athletic club in collaboration with the management of the Bank held year-end beach party, where each year employees from various departments were honored for most dedicated, most hard working and most punctual employees of the Bank.He said following the establishment of the CBL, there was no organization that could represent the voices of the staff as it was done at NBL, until July 2004, when the late Executive Governor, Charles E. Green, thought it wise to re-establish the social club at present day CBL.Adding that the sole purpose of the club was to bring together staff during happy and sad moments and also advocate for them.Meanwhile, the first election of CEBSA was held in 2004, 2007 second election and third election in 2013, which brought Copper and his administration into power. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgAfter months of complaintsAfter numerous complaints were lodged about the difficulties being faced to traverse hinterland roads, contractors were finally mobilised to begin rehabilitative works.The state of hinterland roadsIn a recent engagement, Natural Resources Minister, Raphael Trotman made this announcement, having identified that the prolonged rainy season amplified challenges to manoeuvre along the dreadful thoroughfares.“We have seen some hinterland roads or forest roads suffering some deterioration. I’m advised…that we have seen a prolonged wet season and more intense rainfall which has proven to be challenging for us,” he said.The Natural Resources Minister had established a partnership with the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) and Public Infrastructure Ministry to share responsibility for the maintenance of hinterland roads. Presently, works have already commenced in a few areas.“Some road works have commenced. Certainly, contractors have been mobilised. GGMC, Ministry of Natural Resources and the Ministry of Public Infrastructure are now sharing responsibility for hinterland roads.”In June, the regional administration of Region Eight (Potaro-Siparuni) had embarked on rehabilitative works on the Linden-Lethem trail after citing similar issues.Mayor of Lethem, David Adams had informed that the remedial activities had brought significant relief to the road users who have been suffering in the recent months.Road users, particularly minibus operators plying the trail were complaining of the deteriorated condition of the trail which had become almost impassable. Mayor Adams had said that no major works could be done on the trail during the rainy weather. During this season, extra attention needed to be paid to the trail between Mahdia and Mabura, which was in dire need of repair works.The minibus operators had lamented the deteriorating condition of the trail which they are forced to use to transport passengers and goods as a means of earning their daily bread.They described the trail as a “death trap” and bashed the Public Infrastructure Ministry for paying zero interest in conducting long-term repairs to that trail which is the only access to those areas. Those minibus operators were forced to park their buses for a period of time.Further, when they resumed work, they were unable to get into the mining town with their buses and as such, were forced to take passengers up to a point on the trail and then transfer those passengers and goods and other items to All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and pick-up trucks. These were able to get through the silt and into the mining town.This arrangement persisted for several weeks but resulted in hardships on those passengers and business owners who had to offset the double cost to reach into the mining town. Residents were also facing hardships as businesses were forced to inflate prices to offset the transportation cost and as such, they had to pay higher prices for goods.last_img read more