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Dated Gold Coast house skyrockets almost $2 million past reserve at competitive auction

first_imgIt was sold by the children of the late Ray and Joan Stuart, who owned a local newsagent. Mr Stuart was a former Rotary club president and died in 2006. His wife died earlier this year. The four-bedroom property is on an 810sq m double block with views of the ocean and Burleigh Heads National Park on three sides. The buyers plan to knockdown the property and build a family home.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa10 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoKollosche director Michael Kollosche, who sold the property alongside Eoghan Murphy, said there were 54 bids placed in just 25 minutes. “It’s a trophy asset and very unique as it was the first time to market in over 57 years,” he said. “Most of the buyers looking at it were looking at it as a home site to demolish and build a new home.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:15Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:15 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: The value of a view01:16 Mr Kollosche said the sellers — siblings Duncan, Philip and Julie — were extremely happy with the result. “They are elated to get well above their reserve price and know it’s going to end up with a home a family will enjoy,” he said. “Their preference was not to see a big development there.” The impressive views were a big selling point. The four-bedroom house had a reserve of $3.5 million.The two-level house at 1 Short St had 178 groups inquire, with 18 registered bidders at the auction on the weekend. An opening bid of $1 million was placed before the price was quickly push passed reserve. The hammer fell $1.875 million above the vendors price expectations. MORE NEWS: Imagine living a fairytale A quaint house at 1 Short St, Burleigh Heads, has sold under the hammer for $5.375 million.A DATED Burleigh Heads house has fetched almost $2 million more than expected, selling for a whopping $5.375 million at auction.The property was the legacy of a newsagent’s early-morning paper deliveries 55 years ago and changed hands for the first time in its history. A prominent Gold Coast fashion couple Wez and Eirin Bryett, who founded women’s clothing boutique and fashion line Princess Polly, splashed millions to knock the property down and build a modern masterpiece for their family. RELATED: Burleigh Heads home listed for sale, 55 years after it was built by the local newsagent MORE NEWS: How this home moved suburbs last_img read more

FIFA says GFF has the authority to decide Elite League competition

first_imgWORLD governing body of football, FIFA, has confirmed that the Guyana Football Federation Inc. (GFF) has the right and authority to decide the composition of its competitions, including the Elite League.Four clubs have breached their obligations under the 2015 GFF Constitution by boycotting the 2016-2017 Elite League, after the GFF Executive Committee decided to include a further two teams in the league.In a letter to the GFF dated 1st February, 2017, FIFA’s General Secretary Fatma Samoura said: “It is within the power of the GFF Executive Committee to change the regulations of the Elite League, including determining the number of participating Clubs, unless there is a binding written agreement between the GFF and the Elite League which would state otherwise – to the best of our knowledge, however, such an agreement does not exist.”FIFA’s confirmation follows a similar move by the regional body CONCACAF.The GFF Executive Committee, elected with a mandate to reform football in Guyana, took the decision to expand the Elite League in order to broaden the geographical reach, commercial potential and competitiveness of the league, and to accelerate the development of football across the country.In her letter, Samoura referred to Article 36.2.i. of the GFF Constitution, which states that it is within the powers of the GFF Executive Committee to “draw up regulations governing the conditions of participation in and the staging of competitions organised by the Federation, including the playing schedule.”last_img read more

Career nears end for Zack Mahoney, junior college walk-on turned late-season contender

first_imgLOUISVILLE, Ky. — Zack Mahoney didn’t make his first start under center until the end of the 11th grade. He was asked to become the backup quarterback that year at Lyons Township (Illinois) High School only because other quarterbacks had quit or gotten injured. Mahoney had what he called an “OK,” high school career in which he started only one season and received zero FBS offers.Yet Mahoney has started nine games over the past three seasons as Syracuse’s backup. With starter Eric Dungey’s propensity to get injured late in the year, Mahoney has gone from high-school backup to Syracuse walk-on to the guy the Orange has entrusted with its offense at the end of the past three seasons.Mahoney, a 6-foot-2 senior, has turned in pedestrian performances throughout his career, mostly against conference teams in unfavorable conditions. Saturday was the latest segment, a 56-10 loss at Louisville (7-4, 4-4 Atlantic Coast). Mahoney earned his ninth start for SU (4-7, 2-5) and finished 5-for-15 with two interceptions and 49 passing yards. In the second quarter, he was replaced by third-string QB Rex Culpepper.Given the circumstances, Syracuse head coach Dino Babers said Mahoney has “been a major contributor,” and “someone people from Syracuse will always remember.” Mahoney didn’t get recruited by Syracuse. He didn’t earn a scholarship right away, yet he came to become one of the more important players in the program over the past three seasons.“It’s been one hell of a ride,” Mahoney said after SU’s loss to the Cardinals, dropping Mahoney’s career record as a starter to 1-8. “Had an OK high school career. Coming here, I had very little expectation, and everything I’ve accomplished, I look back and take it all in.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMahoney has had a lot to take in. In high school, he mostly played receiver and defensive back. He received a handful of Division II and FCS offers, as well as Big 10 walk-on spots, but he “was adamant he would get to a Power conference school,” his father, Rick, said.Mahoney felt the best way he could eventually get there was via junior college. He ended up about 15 miles from where he grew up in Chicago suburbs, at the College of DuPage, where he redshirted as a freshman because he was inexperienced and underdeveloped, DuPage head coach Matt Foster said.“But he never ever stopped believing,” Foster said. “He knew he wanted to play big time as a QB. He was very raw first. He wasn’t as ready as we thought he needed to be. He took that whole year to practice on the scout team and came back the next year. He completely transformed our team.”His redshirt freshman year, 2014, Mahoney, a team captain, threw for 1,943 yards and was named a Top 20 National Junior College Athletic Association quarterback. After the season, he met with Foster about his transfer options. Foster put him in touch with several FCS schools, he said. Mahoney declined all of them. His eyes were set on Power 5, the dream he had all of his life.“I said there are some options (in FCS) and he told me that’s not what he’s looking for,” Foster said. “My mouth dropped. He said, ‘Coach, I want to play at the highest level.’ That’s when I called his dad and asked him to make sure. I said, ‘I just want to make sure we’ll on the same page.’ And his dad said, ‘That’s what he wants to do, coach.’ He turned down 1-AA scholarships.”Foster was incredulous, but he knew who to call. He graduated from an Illinois high school with Tim Lester, who was Syracuse’s offensive coordinator then. Foster said he told Lester over the phone that Mahoney could play at SU’s level. Lester knew he was going to enter spring practice that January with only three quarterbacks, Foster said. He trusted Foster.On Christmas Eve 2014, Mahoney said, while sitting on his cousin’s couch, he received a call from Syracuse asking him to come for the spring 2015 semester. Days later, he applied to the university. Within three weeks, he had sent over his DuPage transcripts and been accepted to Syracuse, only about two days before he would need to arrive on campus to start football on Jan. 3.“I truly remember having only about 48 hours to get him cleared on the academic side, accepted to the university, to driving out to Syracuse to join a meeting at noon on a Saturday,” his father, Rick, said.Mahoney arrived at Syracuse in January 2015 as a walk-on. He was the fifth-string QB. When starter Terrel Hunt went down with a career-ending injury in the first quarter of the first game that fall, Mahoney was added to SU’s travel roster. His path to the Syracuse pocket accelerated from there. Dungey suffered an injury in Week 3 against Central Michigan. Mahoney’s name was called.The next week, he earned his first career start, against then-No. 8 LSU, keeping the Orange competitive with the Tigers in a 35-25 loss. He started four games that season, including the last three. Against Boston College in the 2015 season finale, Mahoney threw a touchdown pass in SU’s victory to send off then-head coach Scott Shafer. In his 2015 starts against LSU and then-No. 1 Clemson, the Orange lost by only 10 in each game and Mahoney threw for a combined 234 yards and three touchdowns. In August 2016, new head coach Dino Babers awarded him a scholarship. Facebook Twitter Google+ “From walk-on, look where he’s at right now,” said Syracuse senior offensive lineman Jamar McGloster. “Whenever I see him, when I’m having a bad day, I get on with the day. There’s no excuse to keep on having a bad day, because Zack never quit.”Last week in a loss to Wake Forest, Mahoney’s first start since a year ago at Pittsburgh, he threw for 297 yards and three touchdowns — in the first half alone. He threw two interceptions and went only 11-of-25 over the final 30 minutes, but he had reaffirmed that he is capable of holding his own for SU. Entering Saturday in Louisville, Mahoney averaged 412 passing yards per game and threw for eight TDs and ran for two others over his past two starts.Mahoney’s career will end soon. On Saturday, he may have started his last game. Throughout much of his football life, he was overlooked, doubted and unproven, yet he stitched together a career he hopes is an inspiration for junior college players. He grew from walk-on to a temporary starter, and he is the president of Syracuse’s Uplifting Athletes chapter, a nonprofit organization dedicated to spreading awareness about rare diseases.“A lot of coaches said I’d never be able to make it, to try a different level or to maybe not even think about football,” Mahoney said. “When you hear that, it pushes you to go reach out and get the goal. A lot of people probably thought I was crazy saying no to FCS schools. Even those who supported me said, ‘You know, you might never play a snap there.’ And I said, ‘That’s fine. I see a goal that I want and I’m going to go take it.’” Commentscenter_img Published on November 18, 2017 at 10:10 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21last_img read more