first_imgLiberia will host the first of four global humanitarian hub events, known as the Voices to Action (VTA) in Sanniquillie City, Nimba County, from September 2-3. The conference is intended to address global humanitarian challenges that affect local communities and how these challenges can be mitigated by prioritizing local solutions.VTA is an initiative of the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC) and Liberia was fortunate to be one of the four countries, the only one in Africa to be selected by the global humanitarian body to host the events.The VTA will enable voices of communities concerned to be collected through the series of humanitarian hub events around the world, the first of which will be taking place in Sanniquellie next week.The ever increasing humanitarian crises across the globe, especially the just waning Ebola crisis that devastated the entire Mano River Sub-region, are now compelling major global humanitarian organizations to re-strategize in order to make greater impacts through their responses in the lives of the most vulnerable people at the local community levels.Announcing the VTA confab in Monrovia over the weekend, Fayiah Tamba, Sectretary-General, Liberia National Red Cross Society (LNRCS) said participants will include community members and leaders, Red Cross volunteers, staff and partners, civil society organizations (CSOs) actors and government representative. They will discuss local needs and reflect on how to strengthen community-driven action, be it individual initiatives or community partnerships.In the fight against the EVD in Liberia, it was proven that the bottom up approach, which saw the communities taking the initiatives and playing outstanding roles in the fight, was the best approach that eliminated the virus.“We saw that empowering communities is crucial to delivering sustainable assistance. This was clearly evident during the fight against the EVD.”Mr. Tamba noted that the LNRCS is pleased to host the first humanitarian hub event for VTA, and to share the experiences, concerns and needs of communities in Liberia to the highest sitting of the Red Cross and Red Crescent movement.The LNRCS’ needs and ideas identified at the event will be compiled into a report and discussed with world governments at the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent which will take place in Geneva, Switzerland in December this year, said Tamba.This international conference, which is held every four years, provides a non-political forum for government decision makers and Red Cross and Red Crescent to discuss the most pressing humanitarian challenges and needs and come up with solutions.The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement’s mission is to alleviate human suffering, protect life and health and provide care and relief from disasters and other emergencies.“In Liberia,” Mr. Tamba indicated, “the LNRCS is present in every county and over 95 districts and continues to build stronger communities and address challenges of healthcare, Disaster Risk Reduction, Youth Development, Women’s Empowerment, food security and livelihood in the communities.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgSome 65 countries have already signalled they will take part in the voluntary phase of an historic industry carbon offset accord to be phased in next decade.The International Civil Aviation Organisation’s 191 member states on Thursday agreed to implement the Carbon Offset and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) at the UN-organisation’s 39th Assembly.The world’s first global industry pollution agreement will start as a voluntary scheme from 2021 to 2026 but will then become mandatory across the aviation.Airlines will have to buy carbon credits to offset growth in emissions, a move that is expected to account for less than 2 per cent of revenues but has raised concerns in some states about costs.The scheme will include provisions to deal with special circumstances such as those of fast-growing airlines and airlines which have made significant investments to improve environmental performance already.Aviation accounts for about 2 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions but the size of the aircraft fleet is expected to double over the next two decades.While the industry has been working to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through improved technology, more efficient operations and better flight planning, it needs the offset scheme to achieve its goal of carbon neutral growth from 2020.Parties that have indicated they will sign up for the voluntary scheme include Singapore, the Uhnited Arab Emirates, the US, European States and some smaller nations. However, Russia and India are among those who have said they will not participate in the first phase.“It has taken a great deal of effort and understanding to reach this stage, and I want to applaud the spirit of consensus and compromise demonstrated by our Member States, industry and civil society,” said  ICAO Council rresident Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu.  “We now have practical agreement and consensus on this issue backed by a large number of States who will voluntarily participate in the global market-based measure (GMBM) – and from its outset.“This will permit the CORSIA to serve as a positive and sustainable contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions reduction.”Airlines hailed the agreement as historic and an effective solution for airlines to manage their carbon footprint.“This agreement ensures that the aviation industry’s economic and social contributions are matched with cutting-edge efforts on sustainability,’’ International Air Transport Association director general  Alexandre de Juniac. “With CORSIA, aviation remains at the forefront of industries in combatting climate change.’’De Juniac described the enthusiasm and commitment of states in the voluntary period as impressive.“Even states that would normally not be required to participate—small island nations and developing economies—have shown their commitment by signing up,’’ he said. “The list of states volunteering for the first phase now numbers 65, giving CORSIA which we estimate will cover more than 80 per cent of growth post 2020. And we continue to encourage more states to join.’’US aircraft manufacturer Boeing said the move complemented an earlier agreement by ICAO to establish CO2 standards for aircraft emissions.”The market-based carbon-offset system and CO2 standard are integral to the four-pillar approach the industry is taking to stop the growth of emissions by 2020 and cut them in half by 2050 relative to 2005 levels,’’ Boeing said.  “These efforts also include: investing in new, more efficient aircraft; improving operational performance of the in-service fleet; improving the efficiency of air traffic management and other infrastructure; and scaling up the use of sustainable alternative fuels.’’However, some environmental groups have criticised the deal as inadequate.last_img read more

first_imgPhoto: JetBlue. US carriers are increasingly looking at biometric security as a way of ferreting out the bad guys without annoying customers.The latest such passenger-friendly set-up is slated to be rolled out progressively by US low-cost carrier JetBlue this June.Tests start at Boston Logan International, on JetBlue’s nonstop to Aruba’s Queen Beatrix International. JetBlue contends this is the first initiative of its kind for a U.S. airline.Here’s how it works. Passengers who opt in look into a camera that’s connected to a United States Customs and Border Protection (CPB) database.Then the image is matched to their passport, visa or immigration photograph.There’s no need for a boarding pass and, in theory, the security layer gets stronger and while the inconvenience diminishes.“We hope to learn how we can further reduce friction points in the airport experience,” says Joanna Geraghty, JetBlue’s executive vice president of customer experience. The boarding pass piece of the security is “one of the hardest to solve. Self-boarding eliminates boarding pass scanning and manual passport checks.”This is very much a test, not something that you can expect next week at the airfield near you.But its potential clearly has security officials excited about the possibilities.“By transforming current business operations,” says CPB Deputy Executive Assistant Commissioner John Wagner.  “Airlines and airports will have the opportunity to use verified biometrics to ensure a seamless and consistent process for travelers.”“Seamless” is one of the most overused terms in the travel industry today, but if information technology provider SITA’s system lives up to the prospect of truly “seamless” boarding then this small step in Boston will bring huge benefits for flyers and airlines alike.Also using biometrics is a new Delta Air Line initiative that will allow passengers to use fingerprints to check bags, enter a lounge and board an aircraft.The testing ground in this instance is Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and phase one allows Delta SkyMiles members to forego a paper or mobile boarding pass and hard copy ID in favor of using fingerprints to enter the Delta Sky Club.A second phase will expand that the bag check-in and boarding a flight.“We’re rapidly moving toward a day when your fingerprint, iris or face will become the only ID you’ll need for any number of transactions throughout a given day,” says Delta chief operating officer Gil West.Delta is working with CLEAR systems on the project and hopes ultimately to have fingerprint readers at all boarding gates.last_img read more

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Related Posts I did not think of the very obvious when writing a post yesterday about Jive Software’s new members to its board of directors.The men Jive chose are all talented, intelligent and well-respected people. They have risen to the top of their fields. But where are the women?Jive is not an uncommon example. But the lack of women board members does point to a problem that companies need to address. For the companies that do, there could be advantages that they never expected.Why It Makes Sense to Have More Women Board MembersFor reference, German companies have adopted a voluntary initiative due to the poor representation of women in board seats. In 2010 only 2.2% of executive board members at Germany’s 30 Dax companies were women, according to data from DIW, the German Institute for Economic Research, which the Financial Times refers to in its post about the German initiative. Women held about15% of board seats at Fortune 500 companiesin 2010, according to Catalyst, a nonprofit membership organization that expands opportunities for women in business.Is it an obvious question to ask why there are so few women board members? Perhaps it is more enlightening to ask why it makes sense to have women on the board.But first let’s consider some of the reasons why women are absent from board positions.Rachel Happe writes in a blog post that the the startup world’s go-go-go nature and the resemblance to frat boy culture is an environment where women do not necessarily want to lead. In the same post, Happe writes about the success of women who graduate from women’s colleges, which is evident in their spots on board of directors. The problem is there are so few women graduating from women’s colleges. That seems like it is part of the issue, too.Judy Rosener wrote a post two years ago that still rings true today. Most CEOs are men. And most do not seek out women for the job. They seek people like themselves. What they need to do is get out there and look. If they do that, you can bet there will be women in board-of-director roles.But what are some of the reasons to have women on your board? Rosener distills it down to this:Good business sense means taking into consideration the following: knowledge of the labor pool; knowledge of new and growing markets; interest in improving corporate governance; and the tracking of revenue and profit, i.e. attention to the bottom line.Let’s look at each of these reasons.Labor Pool: Women are more than half of the workforce. Doesn’t it make sense that they should be represented on the board of directors, too? To exclude women from the board can mean that the company may not be seen as a place that welcomes women at all. In turn, that has a direct effect on the company’s competitiveness.The Market: Women are decision makers. Women have a perspective that can alter the development of a product or a service. They manage the finances in the home. They make the purchases. Put women in executive roles and board positions and you can see how their perspectives may open new markets.Governance: A woman joining a board of directors can have an effect on the men. They will be less likely to make sexist remarks and jokes. But there is more to this. Rosener writes: I asked Shirley M. Hufstedler, an experienced corporate board member, how she thinks the presence of women changes a board. Hufstedler served for many years on both the Hewlett-Packard and US West boards, and currently sits on the Harman International Industries board. She said it is her observation that female board members usually understand, better than men, how to appeal to women as consumers and as employees. “Also, because women are acculturated differently from men, they tend to listen more and see problems and solutions differently from their male colleagues.” In many ways this expands and enhances board discussion and deliberation. Bottom Line: Companies with more women in executive positions tend to have higher profits. She writes:A study by Roy Adler, a professor at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, tracked 215 Fortune 500 companies, comparing their financial performance to industry medians. He found that “companies that smash the glass ceiling also enjoy higher profits.” In a recent Harvard Business Review article presenting his findings, Adler showed that “the companies with the highest percentages of female executives delivered earnings far in excess of the median for other large firms in their industries.” The Canadian Conference Board findings support those of Adler. It tracked the financial well being of firms with two or more women on their boards in 1995 to see where they stood six years later. It found that firms with women board members were much more likely than companies with all-male boards to be leaders when ranked by revenue or profit. While these two studies do not a theory make, they suggest there is a relationship between the presence of women on boards and financial performance.Considering that why would a company not have a women on its board? 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now alex williamscenter_img Tags:#Analysis#enterprise#NYT IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

first_imgRecords from 1983 World CupIndia captain Kapil Dev lifted India from 17/5 to score an unbeaten 175 against Zimbabwe at Tunbridge Wells, which proved to be the match-winning innings. Unfortunately there is no TV footage of the innings due to a broadcasters strike.Kapil Dev was the top-scorer for India in 1983 with 303 runs at an average of 60.60 in eight matches.England’s David Gower was the top run-getter in 1983. He scored 384 runs at an average of 76.80.West Indies’ Jeff Dujon had 16 dismissals to his name in 1983 with 15 catches and one stumping.The highest number of dismissals in an innings in 1983 was claimed by Indian wicketkeeper Syed Kirmani. He took five catches against Zimbabwe.Mohinder Amarnath was the first player to win Man-of the-Match awards in successive games. He won those awards during the 1983 semi-final against England and final against West Indies.Martin Snedden of New Zealand had figures of 2/105 which were the worst for a bowler in 1983.In 1983, Pakistan beat New Zealand by 11 runs which was the smallest victory margin in that edition.Kris Srikkanth scored 38 in the 1983 final against the West Indies, the highest of the matchIndia became the first team to beat West Indies in a World Cup match when they beat them by 34 runs on June 9, 1983 during a group match. India then went on to beat the Windies by 43 runs in the final at Lord’sPakistan captain Imran Khan, more famous for his bowling exploits, played as a specialist batsman in 1983. The reason was that he had sustained a leg injury ahead of the tournament.129 was the lowest score during 1983 World Cup, made by Australia against India on June 20.Roger Binny took 18 wickets at an average of 18.66 in eight games in 1983 — the highest in the tournament. advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgMinister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, has highlighted the importance of intellectual property (IP) protection to national development.He noted that IP remains the pillar for providing equitable reward for creators and those who invest in, distribute and manage these innovations.Senator Reid said that having a robust IP framework in place will help to attract and sustain investment in innovations, and spur growth and development, while providing a competitive advantage for countries.He was speaking at the opening of a joint CARICOM/United States Public-Private Sector Stakeholder Seminar and Dialogue on Broadcast Licensing and Enforcement at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel in St. Andrew on June 21.The two-day event brought together content creators, cable operators and other distributors, copyright owners, regulators, collection agencies and policy advisors to examine existing legal provisions on broadcast licensing at both the domestic and international levels, and the impact on consumers.Topics explored included the legal framework for content and signal licensing, business considerations in the US and the Caribbean; and the nature, dimensions, and prevalence of piracy in the region.Senator Reid expressed the hope that the two-day dialogue and seminar will help to craft a relevant model for access to content, while ensuring that IP rights are protected.Other speakers included Regional IP Attaché for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, United States Patent and Trademark Office, J. Todd Reves; Chairman, Broadcasting Commission Jamaica (BCJ), Professor Anthony Clayton; and Political/Economic Counsellor, US Embassy, Kingston, Christian Redmer.The event was organised by the US Patent and Trademark Office in collaboration with the US Embassy Kingston, through support from the CARICOM Secretariat, the BCJ, Jamaica Intellectual Property Office, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information.last_img read more