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Onboarding during COVID: New hires grapple with office politics from home

first_imgOne young trader hired by a major European bank as the British lockdown began said remote working had made corporate culture even tougher to navigate.”It’s not exactly easy for your new boss to explain the specifics of office politics to you without putting their foot in it,” she said, declining to be named due to company policy.”It does feel like it’s taking longer to feel loyalty to my new employer than it might have otherwise. I feel loyal to the team but not to the wider bank.”A new joiner at a different, London-based bank said his interviewers had appeared to study his bookshelves and photos while asking questions, and that he does not expect to meet his colleagues in person until next year, although he joined in May. For Sam Thompson, who joined money saving and investment app MoneyBox, a lack of face-to-face contact did make some early interactions with colleagues feel more transactional. But he appreciated the lengths the company has gone to to make it work.”We’ve been getting Deliveroo vouchers and we’ve been sitting around our computers while talking to one another and having lunch,” he said. “It’s probably the best induction into a company that I’ve ever had,” said the Quality Assurance Engineer, who has had several jobs in six years in the industry.Founded in 2016, MoneyBox has taken on 35 new hires during the lockdown to a total headcount of 135. It initially held off from filling roles requiring interaction with multiple teams, such as developers, Jack Johnstone, head of HR and talent, said, but overcame those fears.Its approach mirrors those of major banks including Standard Chartered, Citi and Deutsche Bank, which have all rapidly redesigned their interview and orientation process.Citi hired around 3,840 new staff in its Institutional Clients Group Operations & Technology between March and August.Once a new hire is appointed, MoneyBox and the banks send out a joining manual or welcoming video along with the required technology.Virtual face-to-face meetings are held much more regularly with managers, buddy partners are formed with existing staff and an array of tech platforms are used to maintain communication.Meetings with different teams and online social events are encouraged to help staff build broader networks and replicate the ‘chance meetings’ they may have had in canteens and lifts.Drinks anyone?Andy Halford, chief financial officer of Standard Chartered, told Reuters online drinks and other social events were vital.”Some people find it easier to talk and connect when they are not ‘at work’,” he said. “We want to humanize this situation for everyone.”Professor Nicholas Bloom at Stanford University said new hires unable to meet colleagues in person would struggle with unspoken rules – from how many hours people really work to when to take a break and what to wear.For graduates, who often work long hours when joining banks or big law firms, that poses another risk. “At home it generates a strong incentive for over-communication, so endlessly sending unnecessary emails and slack messages just to highlight the fact that you’re still there,” Bloom said.Still, McKinsey Partner Alexander DiLeonardo said new hires have to work harder to network. “When you aren’t sitting next to your new colleagues or outside your supervisor’s office, you have to be intentional about reaching out,” he said. Topics :center_img Joining a new company can be tough at the best of times, with bosses to impress, skills to learn and new colleagues to befriend.But that task becomes a whole lot harder when the “onboarding” is done during a pandemic that has forced millions to work from home, leaving new hires to judge colleagues on their taste in curtains and conduct on Zoom.The companies that get it right should have an expanded, grateful workforce, but get it wrong and new hires could find it hard to develop team spirit or a sense of belonging to the firm.last_img read more

JDR to supply cables for wind project to power oil and gas platforms

first_imgHywind Tampen JDR Cable Systems, part of the TFKable Group, has signed a contract with Equinor for the Hywind Tampen offshore wind farm development located off Norway. Image: JDRJDR said on Thursday that it would design and manufacture eleven 66kV dynamic inter-array cables and two static export cables, each equipped with a JDR designed breakaway system and a range of cable accessories for delivery in 2022.The 2.5 km long 66kV dynamic array cables will connect to the eleven turbines in a loop, and the two static 12.9km and 16km export cables will be used to connect the loop to the Snorre A and Gullfaks A platforms.Hywind Tampen will be the first worldwide project to power oil and gas platforms – Gullfaks A, B, C and Snorre A and B – using floating offshore wind, which is more technically challenging and less mature technology than traditional fixed-foundation offshore wind.The project will consist of 11 wind turbines developed by Equinor. The turbines will have a total capacity of 88 MW, capable of meeting about 35 percent of the annual power demand of the Snorre and Gullfaks oil and gas platforms.Also, the floating wind project is in water depths of 300 meters, much deeper than any previous floating wind project.Robert Weeks, sales manager at JDR, said: “Floating wind is still in its infancy compared to fixed-foundation offshore wind, but has the potential to revolutionize how we generate power for deepwater platforms and on coastlines which only have access to deeper waters.”The power cores for the cables will be manufactured by JDR’s parent company TFKable at its Bydgoszcz factory in Poland. All the cables and accessories will be assembled at JDR’s facilities in Hartlepool UK. Equinor, along with its partners in the Snorre and Gullfaks fields, submitted a development plan of supplying power from floating offshore wind to the fields via the Hywind Tampen wind farm back in October.In the same month, Snorre and Gullfaks partners made a final investment decision for the Hywind development.The Hywind investments will total almost NOK 5 billion (around $550 million). Norwegian authorities through Enova have made a funding commitment of up to NOK 2.3 billion for the project. In addition, the Business Sector’s NOx Fund decided to support the project by up to NOK 566 million.Following the development plan submission, Equinor in late October signed contracts totaling around NOK 3.3 billion ($357.6M) for the Hywind development.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

Area Baseball Sectional Scores (5-22)

first_imgArea Baseball Sectional ScoresWednesday  (5-22)Class 1A-Sectional 60 @ Jac-Cen-Del.Oldenburg  8     Jac-Cen-Del  2Hauser  7     North Decatur  5Class 2A-Sectional 45 @ South Ripley.Austin  8     Switzerland County  2Class 3A-Sectional 29 @ South Dearborn.Greensburg  8     Lawrenceburg  5Class 4A-Sectional 14 @ East Central.Bloomington South  1     Bloomington North 0Columbus East  1     Shelbyville  0last_img