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Lecture examines development challenges, economic prospects

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Bart W. Edes, the Asian Development Bank’s representative in North America, addresses challenges and advancements that affect developing Asian countries. He lectured in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday to promote an awareness of the Asian Development Bank’s mission, which involves reducing poverty.The ADB, Edes said, does not work the same way many other banks do. “We’re a bit of a mix between a commercial bank and a program like the United Nations Development Program,” Edes said. “Our overarching mission is not to make money and give the dividends to our shareholders but to fight poverty and promote inclusive, sustainable development in developing nations.” To this end, he said the ADB is involved in financing development all across Asia in a variety of ways, from reforming education in Nepal to implementing clean energy initiatives in the Philippines to building railways in Bangladesh to constructing infrastructure for safe water in Uzbekistan. While most of what the ADB does has to do with funding projects, its employees also conduct research on economic trends of development in Asian countries over recent years.  “In the latest estimates for 2018 for developing Asia — so not including countries such as Japan — we’re looking at about a 6.3 percent increase in gross domestic product,” Edes said.Meanwhile, the United States achieved 2.4 percent growth over the same period, Edes said. The Asian economic sector appears to be one of the most quickly growing and developing that there is, Edes said.“Asian countries are working in ever more integrated and cooperative ways,” he said. When it comes to tourism, for instance, 60 percent of Chinese travelers stay inside the region, which is incredibly important to small Asian countries with large tourism industries, Edes said. The Maldives, for example, attribute 83 percent of its gross domestic product to the tourism industry, he said. While the region is experiencing rapid economic growth and development in some areas, it is still also facing a number of challenges such as poverty, climate change — which can exacerbate monsoons, storms, mudslides and other natural phenomena common to the region — and an aging population. “Asia is among the most vulnerable areas of the world when it comes to climate change,” Edes said. “This could lead to a real humanitarian crisis. We are responding in part by doubling down on our investments on climate change mitigation.” Edes said the ADB is currently committed to putting six billion dollars into countering climate change by 2020. With longevity going up and fertility rates going down across the board in Asia, the aging population may soon create a problem in some Asian countries. Edes said. A similar trend is occurring in other countries across Asia, which could lead to economic trouble as a diminishing workforce has to work increasingly hard for a growing body of dependent citizens. “By 2030, we will have almost 30 percent of Japan’s population at an age of 65 or older,” he said. Tags: ADB, Asian Development Bank, Bart W. Edes, development, Jenkins Nanovic Hall The North American representative for the Asian Development Bank (ADB) — an institution seeking to reduce poverty in Asia and the Pacific — Bart W. Edes, spoke in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday about his experience working for the ADB for the past 16 years and the lessons he has learned about economic growth, development and challenges facing some developing Asian countries.last_img read more

Badgers working on new techniques

first_imgThere’s an old sentiment in the sporting world that states the more experienced teams often perform the best. Don’t tell that to the Wisconsin volleyball team.After having practiced as a team for just a short time this spring, sophomore Kirby Toon was pleased with her team’s 25-23, 25-17, 25-21 victory Saturday over UW-Milwaukee.“We’ve only been practicing for about a week, so it’s looking pretty good,” Toon said. “We have a very young team with a lot of new players coming in.”The Badgers’ roster features many underclassmen and includes only three seniors.Head coach Pete Waite was also impressed by his young team’s performance. He highlighted a few keys to the win that they had practiced during the preceding week.“I thought our serve receive was pretty solid,” Waite said. “That’s something we’ve been working on during our individual workouts and team workouts.”The Badgers were aced just three times and committed only four receiving errors in total.Senior Allison Wack, who led the team with 17 kills in the match, agreed her team’s improved serve receiving was an integral part of their success.“We are just seeing better serve receive than last year,” Wack said. “Overall I think it was great. We’re working on a whole lot of new things and new techniques.”Waite explained some of the new ideas he and his staff have already started to implement.“We had Kirby Toon and Al Wack jump-serving with topspin, which was new for them. They did a nice job,” Waite said. “That always puts the opponent on their heels a little bit.”The new serving technique did seem to throw the Panthers off, allowing the Badgers to pick up several easy points throughout the match. Wisconsin recorded 11 aces, including two by Toon and four by Wack.UW-Milwaukee, however, also presented some unique challenges for the Badgers. The Panthers play in a slightly different way than Waite and his team is accustomed to seeing.“Milwaukee runs a very fast offense so they’re flying all over the place and they’re tough to keep up with,” Waite said. “As a bigger team from the Big Ten, we played a smaller team from the Horizon League that’s a great ball handling team and I think our ball handling stood up with theirs; it’s not an easy thing to do because every conference recruits in a different way.”Although the Badgers stood up to most of the challenges that Milwaukee presented, Waite and his players know there is still much to be learned.Waite specifically addressed the team’s struggles with maintaining a high hit percentage. The Badgers struggled in that statistical category, hitting only .141. In 2009, Wisconsin finished with a .172 percentage for the season.“Our hitting percentage needs to be better; we need to bring that up,” Waite said. “After a week of team training, that’s a really good reminder to us of what [we] need to focus on even more.”The Badgers are hoping they can improve in all areas this spring while also gaining valuable experience for the more trying fall season.“Our goal isn’t necessarily [about] the wins and the losses,” Toon said. “It’s to go out and improve every time we play.”last_img read more

Environment Canada issues special weather statement with heat wave

first_img– spend at least several hours each day in an air-conditioned facility (such as a shopping centre, library, community centre or restaurant).– use public splash pools, water parks or pools or take a cool bath or shower.– at current temperatures, fans alone are not effective. Applying cool water mist or wet towels to your body prior to sitting in front of a fan is a quick way to cool off.– wear loose, light-weight clothing. Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses.– keep your home cool. Open windows, close shades, use an air conditioner and prepare meals that do not require an oven.Advertisement 4. Get informed.– check the local news for health and safety updates.– for more information on heat-related illness, call healthlink BC at 811.– contact your Local Government to find out what services (such as air conditioned buildings and public splash parks) are available in your area.Hot, dry weather can lead to higher fire risk. Please see the B.C. wildfire management branch website at bcwildfire.ca for more details and fire safety tips. 1. Stay hydrated.– drink cool beverages (preferably water) irrespective of your activity intake. Don’T wait until you are thirsty.– if your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask about increasing the amount of water you can drink while the weather is hot.2. Keep cool.Advertisement Issued at 2014-07-13 19:33 UTC by Environment Canada: Special weather statement continued for:   B.C. South Peace River, B.C. (087310)  B.C. North Peace River, B.C. (087320) Fort Nelson, B.C. (088100) Current details: Extremely hot weather will continue…Very warm air from the desert southwest of the United States has moved into the British Columbia Interior. Afternoon temperatures from the mid 30’s to 40 degrees will continue through Wednesday. Temperatures may exceed 40 degrees in several regions. A cooling trend will occur later in the week.- Advertisement -This bulletin will be updated at 11 AM Monday.Coping with the heat.There are many symptoms of heat-related illness, including thirst, dizziness, confusion, weakness and fainting/collapsing. Medical health officers are reminding residents to protect themselves from the heat by staying hydrated, keeping cool and checking on others.Advertisement – avoid sunburn, stay in the shade or use sunscreen with SPF 30 or more.– avoid tiring work or exercise in the heat. If you must exercise, drink two to four glasses of non-alcoholic fluids each hour.– never leave children or pets alone in a parked car. Temperatures can rise to 52 c within 20 minute s in an enclosed vehicle when the outside temperature is 34 c. Leaving the car windows slightly open or cracked will not keep the inside of the vehicle at a safe temperature.3. Check in on others.– check regularly on people living alone who may be at high risk of severe heat related illness. This includes seniors, those who are unable to leave their homes and anyone who may not be spending at least several hours every day in air conditioned places. – if they are unwell, move them to a cool shady spot, help them get hydrated and call for medical assistance if required.Advertisementlast_img read more