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Martin Keown names two positives for Arsenal after Tottenham defeat

first_img Arteta reacts to his Arsenal side’s 2-1 defeat against TottenhamTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 9:05FullscreenArteta reacts to his Arsenal side’s 2-1 defeat against Tottenhamhttps://metro.co.uk/video/arteta-reacts-arsenal-sides-2-1-defeat-against-tottenham-2209436/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘Both goals conceded by Arsenal could have been avoided. That’s the bottom line. Not for the first time, sloppiness was their undoing.‘It had looked like progress was being made of late, with Mikel Arteta’s men keeping three consecutive Premier League clean sheets. Were it not for Eddie Nketiah’s sending off — and then conceding a late equaliser against Leicester — it might have been four.‘But then they go and do this.  ‘Let’s start with the first goal — the equaliser which arrived three minutes after Alexandre Lacazette’s excellent opener. Sead Kolasinac had the ball and Kieran Tierney was open on the wing. But he didn’t pass to him.  More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘Instead, he looked backwards and opted for David Luiz. Yet rather than play it to Luiz’s left foot like he should have done, he went for his right. It gifted Son Heung-min a run on goal and Spurs were back in it.‘Arsenal had 76 per cent possession in the second half. They looked in control. But they were undone by a set piece.‘Tierney, 5ft 10in, marked 6ft 2in Toby Alderweireld. The Tottenham defender won and that was that.’MORE: Arsenal star Gabriel Martinelli responds to Ronaldinho comparing him to RonaldoMORE: Arsenal could play in the Community Shield even if they lose to Manchester City in FA Cup semi-finalFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Metro Sport ReporterMonday 13 Jul 2020 9:12 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.2kShares Advertisement Martin Keown names two positives for Arsenal after Tottenham defeat Comment Advertisement Keown says Arteta needs to work out his best system (Picture: Getty Images)Martin Keown says Dani Ceballos and Emiliano Martinez were the shining lights in Arsenal’s otherwise dismal performance in their 2-1 loss to Spurs on Sunday.After going a goal up through Alexandre Lacazette in the first half, a stray pass from Sead Kolasinac allowed Heung-Min Son to equalise just minutes later, before Toby Alderweireld headed in a late winner to seal all three points for Spurs.Martinez was once again in good form for the Gunners, making seven saves to keep the scoreline down, and Ceballos, who has also been in a rich vein of form since the restart, made Mikel Arteta’s side tick in midfield.AdvertisementAdvertisementAnd while Arsenal legend Keown believes there were a few encouraging performances to take from the loss, he insists both goals could have been easily avoided.ADVERTISEMENT‘There were positives for Arsenal, Keown told the Daily Mail. ‘Dani Ceballos was promising in midfield, while keeper Emiliano Martinez was probably their best player. ‘But Arteta needs to decide which way he wants his team to play — three or four at the back — and buy players who suit his preferred system.‘Harry Kane and Son posed problems. We saw Shkodran Mustafi diving in — maybe that’s because he doesn’t feel he’s going to get cover from Luiz behind him.  ‘Choose your system, Arteta, and buy accordingly.last_img read more

Investors turn back to stocks

first_img That leaves stocks. According to Kleintop, earnings per share for companies listed in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index have risen 46 percent since 2001 and dividends per share are up 39 percent. Yet a stock’s value, measured by comparing its price to potential earnings, has declined. In 2001, stocks were priced about 22.2 times forward earnings, compared to 13.8 times forward earnings today, Kleintop said. In other words, while a given stock may have risen or fallen over the past five years, stock investors could get more for their dollar overall on Wall Street. There’s evidence that investors are already moving back to stocks. Mutual fund companies reported strong inflows through the second half of 2005. And in the first two weeks of 2006, E-Trade Financial Corp. said it has seen a 50 percent increase in walk-in traffic at its New York financial center. On Monday, when the Dow first topped 11,000, E-Trade’s trading traffic saw a two-year high. “I definitely think you’re seeing more investor confidence in the marketplace,” said Michael Curcio, executive vice president for retail at E-Trade. “But it’s also a different kind of investor than we saw during the dot-com bubble.” In the 1990s, investors jumped on anything in the tech sector, regardless of whether the companies even planned to turn a profit in the near future. That exuberance, which was all but destroyed when the tech-focused Nasdaq dropped 78 percent in just 2 years, has been replaced by a new appreciation of well-established, profitable, dividend-paying companies. “It’s not a sector play. There’s no real huge leader like tech was in the `90s,” Kleintop said. “It’s about finding the right company with a compelling story.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita Since the dot-com bubble burst in 2000-01, the housing market has taken off. The number of home sales climbed steadily since 2001, the last time the Dow was at 11,000. And while the Dow eventually fell to 7,286.27 on Oct. 9, 2002 – the nadir of the bear market – home prices have doubled or even tripled in some areas, such as New York, San Francisco and southern California. Yet recent evidence suggests the housing market is slowing. Existing home sales are expected to fall 4.4 percent in 2006 after years of record sales, while new construction is expected to drop 6.6 percent, according to the National Association of Realtors. And the median price of a home, forecast to rise 12.9 percent for 2005, is expected to climb just 5.1 percent this year – a solid increase, but small compared to the ones real estate investors have enjoyed over the past few years. “Baby boomers are turning 60, and they’re working to build up those nest eggs for retirement. For some that are running behind, that means putting at least some of that nest egg into more aggressive investments,” said David Kelly, senior economic adviser at Putnam Investments in Boston. “For a while, that was real estate or high-yield bonds. Not anymore.” Investor confidence in high-yield bonds has been shaken over the last year as the at-risk companies that issue them have struggled – just look at General Motors Corp.’s bonds, which tumbled in value, or those of Refco Inc., the one-time financial services darling that plummeted into bankruptcy after its chief executive allegedly hid $430 million in bad debts off the books. Even government bonds have been volatile, with the yield curve inverting in the last week of 2005. Normally, long-term bonds like the 10- or 30-year yield more than a two-year or shorter-term note, because the government is borrowing the principal longer. But when the curve inverted, the two-year had better returns than the 10-year and increased investors frustrations. NEW YORK – Bruce McMeiken has had a good run investing in real estate near his Orange County, Calif., home. Now, however, he thinks there’s a better place for his money: the stock market. “I don’t think we’re all the way back yet in stocks, but I believe there’s some good bargains out there,” said McMeiken, a one-time dot-com executive. “Real estate’s been good, and I don’t think you’re going to see that bubble completely burst, but I think it’s time to look at stocks again.” Like other investors in the first half of the decade, McMeiken had success investing in real estate. But with sales slowing and home prices flat, there’s a concern that the real estate market is cooling. And with bonds experiencing worrisome trends and increased volatility, and the Dow Jones industrial average topping 11,000 this past week, investors have increasingly focused on stocks. “We’ve already seen individual investors showing some signs of interest in the fourth quarter, and something like Dow 11,000 just increases that interest,” said Jeff Kleintop, chief investment strategist for PNC Financial Services Group in Philadelphia. “This week could be the shot in the arm people need to really get back in again.” last_img

How PBMs Can End Up Pocketing Nearly 200 For A Bottle Of

first_img Stat: The Hospital Exec On New Generic Maker: Trying To Bring ‘Sanity’ Stat: Fact-Checking An Ad War Over Drug Prices, Celgene, And Bob Hugin Stat: SEC Charges Biotech Billionaire Philip Frost With Pump-And-Dump Fraud The Wall Street Journal: General Atlantic Takes Majority Stake In OneOncology, A Startup For Running Cancer-Doctor Practices Kaiser Health News: Unwitting Patients, Copycat Comments Play Hidden Role In Federal Rule-Making The rising cost of prescription drugs is an issue in midterm races across the country, but nowhere more so than in New Jersey, where one candidate is the recently retired CEO of an actual drug company. So we decided to take a look at the rhetoric in that race, pitting incumbent Sen. Bob Menendez against former Celgene boss Bob Hugin. In TV ads blanketing New Jersey (and Philadelphia and New York City), Menendez paints his opponent as a craven profiteer, raising prices on patients with no other options. But Hugin argues that Celgene has saved thousands of lives by giving away doses of its banner cancer drug for free to patients who can’t afford it. (Garde, 9/11) Stat: Pfizer Taps Two Neuroscience Startups For Incubator Prize Just months after Pfizer slashed hundreds of jobs in  its own neuroscience R&D program, the pharmaceutical giant is making notable investments in two Boston-based neuroscience startups. The company announced Wednesday that Tevard Biosciences and QurAlis will each receive one of Pfizer’s coveted “Golden Tickets”— a valuable voucher for the fees associated with renting a spot for one scientist for one year at LabCentral, a biotech incubator in Cambridge, Mass. For companies based elsewhere, the ticket also allows a start-up to set up shop at the noted space in Kendall Square. (Sheridan, 9/12) How PBMs Can End Up Pocketing Nearly $200 For A Bottle Of Pills Costing Less Than $6 News outlets report on stories related to pharmaceutical pricing. The New York Times: A Battle Plan For A War On Rare Diseases Boston Globe: In The Go-Go Biotech World, A Cautionary Tale Stat: Amid Anger Over Drug Prices, Former Pharma CEO Bob Hugin Runs For The Senate Bloomberg: The Secret Drug Pricing System Middlemen Use To Rake In Millions Private-equity firm General Atlantic has agreed to invest $200 million in a startup that aims to manage independent cancer-treatment clinics, the latest sign investors see opportunity in the health-services sector. The investment makes General Atlantic the majority owner of OneOncology, a startup that launched this month. Its founders, three cancer-treatment practices in Tennessee and New York, are the other owners and its first customers. (Evans, 9/12) File this under “If at first you don’t succeed, …” AmerisourceBergen (ABC), which is one of the nation’s largest pharmaceutical wholesalers, has conceded that its compounding business needs to be fixed, so the company has hired manufacturing experts to review procedures at a key facility in Memphis and postponed plans to resume shipments. (Silverman, 9/7) center_img Not everybody reads the legal notices inside the Ottumwa Courier. But in January, Iowa pharmacist Mark Frahm noticed something unusual in the paper. For years, Frahm’s South Side Drug bought pills from distributors, and dispensed prescriptions to the Wapello County jail. In turn, the pharmacy got reimbursed for the drugs by CVS Health Corp., which managed the county’s drug benefits plan. As he compared the newspaper notice with his own records, and then with the county’s, Frahm saw that for a bottle of generic antipsychotic pills, CVS had billed Wapello County $198.22. But South Side Drug was reimbursed just $5.73. So why was CVS charging almost $200 for a bottle of pills that it told the pharmacy was worth less than $6? And what was the company doing with the other $192.49? (Langreth, Ingold and Gu, 9/11) The Wall Street Journal: Big Pharma Catches Up With Biotech For the CEO of a biotech startup, there may be no bigger asset than a compelling sales pitch. Frank Reynolds had a great one. He hadn’t planned a career in biotechnology, the head of Cambridge-based InVivo Therapeutics would tell investors. His calling found him. (Saltzman, 9/8) The Wall Street Journal: Drug Distributor AmerisourceBergen Names New Finance Chief Angered by rising prices and persistent shortages of generic drugs, seven of the nation’s largest hospital systems have launched a new, not-for-profit manufacturer. The company, which was first discussed publicly earlier this year, starts with a $100 million in capital and loans, some of which will come from three philanthropic organizations, including the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. Civica Rx will contract with other companies to make more than a dozen generics and some sales will start in mid-2019. We spoke with Dan Liljenquist, a vice president at Intermountain Healthcare who initiated the project, about the possibilities and challenges. This is an edited version of our conversation. (Silverman, 9/6) Stat: AmerisourceBergen Scrambles Again To Fix A Troubled Compounding Facility Among the 30,000 attendees of the Rutherford Street Fair, sweating it out on the street between the zeppoles and deep-fried Oreos, was the pharmaceutical millionaire who wants to be their next senator. Bob Hugin, the former CEO of Celgene, spent Labor Day walking through the crowd with a phalanx of staff and volunteers, each with a sign and a T-shirt bearing his name. They chanted, cheered, and sloganeered as Hugin’s would-be constituents looked on, varyingly bemused or befuddled at the merry little militia demonstrating in their town. Hugin shook hands, posed for photos, and remembered to say “good to see you” but never “nice to meet you.” (Garde, 9/6) A proposal to sharply cut a drug discount program that many hospitals rely on drew some 1,400 comments when the Trump administration announced its plan last year. Hundreds appeared to come from patients across the country — pleas from average Americans whose treatments for diseases such as cancer depend on costly medicines. But a review of the responses found that some individuals were not aware they apparently had become part of an organized campaign to oppose what’s known as the “340B” program. (Tribble, 9/11) It was a great summer for big pharma stocks. Investors shouldn’t expect that trend to reverse this fall. As has become routine, biotechnology stocks had a strong summer. A broad index of those stocks is up about 15% this year and is near a record. This time, however, major pharmaceutical companies are joining in the rally. (Grant, 9/5) A decade ago, when their son Bertrand was still an infant, Matthew Might and his wife, Cristina, realized that there was something terribly wrong. When he cried, his eyes stayed dry; the lack of tears damaged his corneas and threatened blindness. Eventually, he suffered seizures, a movement disorder and a severe developmental delay. It took four years to discover the problem: Bertrand had inherited two mutations of the NGLY1 gene, which plays a key role in recycling cellular waste. That meant the child’s cells were choking on their own trash. (Weintraub, 9/10) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Philip Frost, a longtime biotech billionaire, was accused Friday of taking part in a pump-and-dump stock scheme that bilked investors out of $27 million. The Securities and Exchange Commission charged Frost and nine others in connection with what it described as a scheme to buy up shares in penny-stock biotechs, illegally promote the companies online, and then sell their shares before the bottom fell out. (Garde, 9/7) Drug distributor AmerisourceBergen Corp. ABC -0.35% said its finance chief Tim Guttman will retire in November and will be succeeded by Executive Vice President James Cleary. Mr. Guttman has served as the company’s chief financial officer since May 2012, and was previously vice president and corporate controller since joining the company in 2002. He will continue to serve as an adviser further into fiscal 2019 to ensure a smooth transition, the company said. (Shumsky, 9/10) last_img read more