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ND ranked as top-producing institution for Fulbright grants

first_imgMary McGraw Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of national fellowships in Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said placement on the list is a significant honor for the University, raising its profile even further among U.S. doctoral and research institutions.“The grants benefit Notre Dame by confirming the University’s commitment to internationalization and expanding our global reputation,” he said. “Notre Dame Fulbright recipients are not just representing the U.S. abroad; they are representing Notre Dame abroad as well.”Thibert said the Fulbright is a great opportunity for students for three key reasons, the first of which is its ability to allow students to deepen their engagements with a particular part of the world through an immersive academic and cultural experience.“Second, the Fulbright provides funding for work that can significantly enhance one’s professional trajectory, whether that work is graduate study, dissertation research or classroom teaching experience,” he said. “Third, receiving a Fulbright grant opens the door to a vast network of Fulbright recipients around the world, and the prestige associated with the Fulbright has been a marker of outstanding achievement for decades.”Strong applicants often have experiences in their academic or extracurricular histories that indicate an interest in the wider world and the ability to adapt to an unfamiliar cultural environment, Thibert said. These experiences may involve study or research abroad as well as participation in internationally-themed coursework or clubs.“Notre Dame students are competitive applicants for the Fulbright because the University has prioritized international engagement for undergraduates and graduate/professional students,” he said. “…Because the Fulbright U.S. Student Program is fundamentally about promoting cultural exchange through educational exchange, international engagement as a student is a key indicator that someone will be an effective representative of the U.S. abroad.”Class of 2014 alumna Deanna Kolberg, who received a Fulbright grant for the 2014-15 program, is currently working as a teaching assistant in South Korea.Hoping to one day pursue a policy job within the U.S. government, Kolberg said she sees herself contributing to foreign policy through research or ground work with the Department of State.“Korea is of huge importance for U.S. national security policy, with large numbers of military personnel protecting the border from a hostile state to the North, and lies as a hub for U.S. security in greater Asia,” she said. “I can’t think of a job in foreign policy over the next 50 years that won’t need knowledge of Korea.”Kolberg said anyone looking to apply for a Fulbright grant should take full advantage of the opportunities Notre Dame has to offer.“Don’t spend your fall break at home — apply for a Nanovic Grant,” she said. “Do research beyond what’s required of your classes. Write a senior thesis. Keep in touch with your professors.”Kolberg said she has benefited in a variety of ways as a result of joining the Fulbright community.“You’re in a group of really highly motivated internationally-minded thinkers, with plenty of opportunity to interact,” she said. “I’ve learned a whole new set of skills and patience living with a Korean host family in pretty much the middle of nowhere.”As a teacher in Korea, Kolberg said she has experienced both the joys and pains of teaching and her own Korean has slowly improved as well.“More than anything, I’m one of the few people I graduated with who can honestly say they love their job,” she said.Even when her mood wasn’t the best, Kolberg said she was uplifted when greeted by students in the hallway shouting, “We love you, Deanna!”“And you just can’t have a bad day like that,” she said. “They just won’t let you.”After her school’s graduation day last week, Kolberg said countless students told her how much they appreciated her class and how much they learned. Her next career move is now centered on returning to the United States.“I recently was accepted to the Ph.D. in political science program at the University of Michigan, which I can only think had something to do with my participation in the Fulbright program,” she said.Class of 2014 alumnus Marcus Liddell, another 2014-15 Fulbright recipient, also received an English teaching assistantship, although he currently resides in Germany, working at a secondary school teaching grades 7-12.Liddell said he decided to apply for the Fulbright grant due to his interest in education and his pursuit of a degree in German and minor in education, schooling and society.“My summer jobs had been education-related,” he said. “I had studied abroad in Germany for a semester, and I had spent a week while I was there shadowing teachers at a local high school, so I had some evidence that this was the kind of thing I’d like to be doing with or without a fellowship.”After returning from study abroad in Berlin, Liddell said he was almost fluent in German.“I felt like I needed more time in Germany to really become comfortable speaking the language, and that was something that was really important to me,” he said.Beyond that, Liddell said he already knew a little bit about education in Germany and was interested in getting a closer, first-hand look at how the system worked.“It was an easy choice from both the standpoint of improving my German and the standpoint of getting some practical experience as an educator,” he said.With about 12 to 14 lessons a week, Liddell said, for the most part, he does all the teaching. He said he spends his time outside of the classroom traveling, working in the community with sports and other activities and pursuing a research project.“I’ve started [to] run a couple after-school clubs and helped out with a number of shorter-term projects,” he said. “… When the weather gets a little nicer here, I’d like to start a small touch rugby league at my school.”Liddell said students interested in a Fulbright should consider the application process early and work with an advisor.“Decide if the things you want to do fit with what the Fulbright is offering,” he said. “If you’re a good fit in your mind, if you’re not just curious, but truly passionate, then you should consider applying.”Applications for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program are assisted in a joint effort between the CUSE and the Graduate School, Thibert said. Undergraduates interested in learning more should visit CUSE National Fellowships online at http://fellows.nd.edu, and graduate/professional students and alumni should contact Dr. Mike Westrate at gradgrants@nd.edu“As we send more Fulbright recipients around the world, they raise the University’s global profile, which will help us to continue to bring the best international students to the University while fostering productive international academic collaborations,” Thibert said.Tags: Fulbright, fulbright grants, fulbright scholar awards, Fulbright Scholars, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Jeffrey T Ten students from Notre Dame were awarded Fulbright grants for the 2014-15 program, ranking the University as a top-producing institution of grant recipients.last_img read more

Works commence on hinterland roads

first_imgAfter months of complaintsAfter numerous complaints were lodged about the difficulties being faced to traverse hinterland roads, contractors were finally mobilised to begin rehabilitative works.The state of hinterland roadsIn a recent engagement, Natural Resources Minister, Raphael Trotman made this announcement, having identified that the prolonged rainy season amplified challenges to manoeuvre along the dreadful thoroughfares.“We have seen some hinterland roads or forest roads suffering some deterioration. I’m advised…that we have seen a prolonged wet season and more intense rainfall which has proven to be challenging for us,” he said.The Natural Resources Minister had established a partnership with the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) and Public Infrastructure Ministry to share responsibility for the maintenance of hinterland roads. Presently, works have already commenced in a few areas.“Some road works have commenced. Certainly, contractors have been mobilised. GGMC, Ministry of Natural Resources and the Ministry of Public Infrastructure are now sharing responsibility for hinterland roads.”In June, the regional administration of Region Eight (Potaro-Siparuni) had embarked on rehabilitative works on the Linden-Lethem trail after citing similar issues.Mayor of Lethem, David Adams had informed that the remedial activities had brought significant relief to the road users who have been suffering in the recent months.Road users, particularly minibus operators plying the trail were complaining of the deteriorated condition of the trail which had become almost impassable. Mayor Adams had said that no major works could be done on the trail during the rainy weather. During this season, extra attention needed to be paid to the trail between Mahdia and Mabura, which was in dire need of repair works.The minibus operators had lamented the deteriorating condition of the trail which they are forced to use to transport passengers and goods as a means of earning their daily bread.They described the trail as a “death trap” and bashed the Public Infrastructure Ministry for paying zero interest in conducting long-term repairs to that trail which is the only access to those areas. Those minibus operators were forced to park their buses for a period of time.Further, when they resumed work, they were unable to get into the mining town with their buses and as such, were forced to take passengers up to a point on the trail and then transfer those passengers and goods and other items to All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and pick-up trucks. These were able to get through the silt and into the mining town.This arrangement persisted for several weeks but resulted in hardships on those passengers and business owners who had to offset the double cost to reach into the mining town. Residents were also facing hardships as businesses were forced to inflate prices to offset the transportation cost and as such, they had to pay higher prices for goods.last_img read more

WATCH trans and female Jews are making a video teaching you how

first_imgTeacher suspended for educating students about LGBT peopleTrans author: ‘A lot of gay men are gay men as a consolation prize because they couldn’t be women’Two-thirds of black LGBT people face racism within LGBT communityRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/watch-trans-female-jews-making-video-teaching-wear-tefillin/ Women praying in Tefillin In addition to featuring diverse Jews, the video will also talk about other differences in Tefillin practice. For instance, they will show a Jew who wraps Tefillin according to Sephardic rather than Ashkenazic customs, and one who is left-handed and thus wraps on the left arm instead of the right.‘My instinct was that this was going to strike a chord within a small subset of the Jewish community: the part of the community that is interested in laying tefillin but not the Orthodox,’ Putterman said.And indeed, many non-Orthodox synagogues now encourage both men and women to use Tefillin.Reaching goalsIn only eight days, Putterman’s campaign surpassed their fundraising goal thanks to more than 100 donors.With the money, Putterman plans to hire a professional crew to shoot and edit the video, which she hopes to release in September. Additionally, she hopes to launch a website that will feature the personal stories of the 10 diverse Jews in the video.‘I’ve been a feminist activist my whole life, and I’ve done a lot of research around these issues and writing about it,’ Putterman said. ‘But there’s something so profoundly satisfying about this visual imagery of non-cisgender men wearing this stuff, and not just wearing it but engaged in the practice.’Learn more about All Gender Wrap in the video below:[embedded content]Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Consisting of a set of small, black boxes with tiny Torah scrolls inside and leather straps, Tefillin is customarily only worn by men—but that is changing.Women and TefillinWhen Rachel Putterman, a 52-year-old woman, enrolled in Rabbinical school, she couldn’t quite get the hang of how to put on Tefillin. She turned to YouTube only to discover low-quality videos solely featuring men.‘It was just upsetting to me that there was nobody that looked like me. It seemed like a glaring gap,’ Putterman told Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA).So, Putterman, who formerly worked as a public interest lawyer, decided to start an IndieGoGo campaign to create an educational video featuring people of all genders.The project will aptly be titled All Genders Wrap.The videoPutterman is directing All Genders Wrap and it is being produced by fellow Hebrew College rabbinical student Gita Karasov. The video will include 10 diverse Jews—including men, women, trans, and non-binary people—of different ethnic and racial backgrounds.‘I want to make a statement to counter what you see when you go on YouTube, that there are people of all genders engaged in practice,’ Putterman said.center_img GAYSTARNEWS- Tefillin, a prayer object typically worn by Orthodox Jews, can be a strange thing to learn how to properly wear. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…last_img read more