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Native American Student Association of Notre Dame protests Columbus murals

first_imgThe Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) gathered outside the Main Building, organizing a peaceful protest of the university’s Gregori murals Monday afternoon. The aim of the organization is to obtain the University’s commitment to Native American diversity through a peaceful manner.Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Commissioned by Fr. Edward Sorin, Vatican artist Luigi Gregori painted these large murals, displayed in the Main Building. According to a statement by the University regarding the Columbus murals, Sorin wanted art that represented the Catholic spirit of the University. However, NASAND protested the misrepresentation of Columbus’ ways along with the offensive and stereotypical portrayal of Native Americans in the murals.The peaceful protest began with speeches from NASAND members, who spoke of the importance of Native American representation on campus, and was followed by a more informal forum, giving attendees the opportunity to ask NASAND students questions.NASAND president and senior Dom Acri discussed some of the problems associated with the Gregori murals. Acri talked about the University’s use of the William Faulkner quote, “The past is never dead, it is not even past,” and he said NASAND hopes to take back this sentiment and make people aware of Native American culture and significance.“In an attempt to address these understandably controversial, and what our group would even call openly marginalizing murals, we are reminded that like this quote suggests, we must recognize the past because it is still here with us,” Acri said.In addition to making students, faculty and administration aware of NASAND’s desire for greater recognition and inclusion from the University, the organization has detailed goals for greater diversification throughout the school year.Acri said the student group wants to be talked to, not talked about. NASAND wants to hold a town hall meeting regarding the status and further actions in dealing with the Gregori murals, something Acri said is strengthened by the involvement of allied members.“What we need is for people to get behind us and help our movement gain momentum,” Acri said.Among other important plans are the group’s hope to serve as a connection to the Pokagon band — the tribe whose land Notre Dame rests on. Acri said NASAND would like to assist in the recruitment of a Native American faculty and establish a Native American Studies program, bring back the Notre Dame powwow and achieve greater involvement in Notre Dame’s “Walk the Walk” event.“A diverse community strengthens Notre Dame’s mission and allows students to open their minds to new perspectives,” Acri said. “But when the only representation that we have right now is these murals, we don’t think Notre Dame is fulfilling that goal. We wanted to have this event in order to help Notre Dame achieve their mission.”Tags: Columbus murals, NASAND, Native Americans, protestlast_img read more

SBU Prof. Named First Andrew Carnegie Fellow from a Long Island College

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Stony Brook University professor was the first educator from a college on Long Island to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow when he won the prestigious fellowship this week.Jared Farmer, an environmental historian and award-winning adjunct professor of history, plans to use the $200,000 award to complete a creative non-fiction book on the human relationship with long-lived trees and our larger relationship with nature in a time of climate change.“I am bringing together the history of trees and the science of longevity to contemplate the ethics and politics of long-term thinking in the Anthropocene,” said Farmer. “I’m a historian by training, but this new project includes aspects of science writing as well as creative writing.”Farmer is one of 35 fellows recognized by the program, which aims to support emerging humanities scholars that are working to strengthen the US democracy, drive creativity, explore global connections and improve environments. The program launched in 2015 and each fellow publishes a book or major study.The professor, who earned his PhD in history from Stanford University, previously authored three books, including the award-winning On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape. He began teaching at Stony Brook a decade ago.“Climate change is not only the policy problem of our time; it is also a problem of time,” Farmer said. “It requires thinking and caring in the long term—beyond the moment, the individual, and the species. I think it’s important to find historical precedents for long-term stewardship of the more-than-human world. To the extent possible in 2017, I want to write a hopeful book—one that shows the shared solicitudes of science, religion, and the humanities.”last_img read more

Air France introduces direct flights Paris – Split in the summer season and increases the number of flights to Dubrovnik

first_imgThe Air France and KLM Group has decided, after the introduction of direct KLM flights to Split 2016 and Air France to Dubrovnik 2018, to introduce a new Air Franc route: Paris – Split during July and August.  Departures for Split from Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport for the summer season 2019. Departures for Dubrovnik from Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport Air France introduced two direct flights to Dubrovnik in 2018, but decided to increase the number of weekly flights (from 2 to 5) in the period from April to September 2019 to Dubrovnik and add flights on weekends during the summer season. At the same time, Air France will increase the number of flights to Dubrovnik from April to September and introduce flights on weekends, which means that it will connect Dubrovnik with Priza five times a week.  last_img read more

Christchurch teens increasingly violent towards parents

first_imgNewstalk ZB 14 May 2013Christchurch teenagers are said to be increasingly violent towards their parents – and the earthquakes are being blamed.Staff at the Womens Refuge have noticed an increase in mainly male teenagers domestically abusing their family members – and it seems mothers are the first to cop it.Additional staff have had to be recruited due to increased demands like this at the refuge.Spokeswoman Julie McCloy says the increase has been over the past two years.“Perhaps what we’ve seen is just that accumulation of stress and maybe see young people who have grown up in a difficult or abusive environment and you add that extra stress to it, they don’t know how to handle their emotions.”Ms McCloy says it’s a worrying trend.“Over probably about 25 percent of the police reports we get there’ll be incidents where a young person is involved as a perpetrator of violence so that’s significant.”She says the youngest they’ve seen was 14-years-old.They’re not expecting the boom to drop off anytime soon.http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/wellington/news/regch/1804940486-worrying-trend-amongst-christchurch-teenslast_img read more

DPS officer killed in double homicide

first_imgA Dept. of Public Safety officer and his fiancee were found late Sunday dead from gunshots in a parked car in Irvine, Calif.The victims, who were found in the vehicle at about 9:10 p.m., were identified as Keith Lawrence, 27, and Monica Quan, 28. Gunshots were not reported that night, and the bodies were only found after a passerby noticed Lawrence slumped over the steering wheel, according to police. Law enforcement officials are continuing to investigate the crime as a double homicide, not a murder-suicide.Lawrence joined DPS in August 2012 and at the time of his death was assigned to patrol operations, according to DPS Capt David Carlisle. He was an armed officer and a graduate of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Academy. His fiancee Quan was a assistant basketball coach for the Cal State Fullerton women’s team. Both were graduates of Concordia University.DPS Chief John Thomas released a statement Monday regarding the shooting:“It is with great sadness and a very heavy heart that I announce the untimely death of a member of the DPS Family, PSO I Keith Lawrence.  Officer Lawrence and his fiancée were discovered deceased earlier this morning; victims of a senseless act of violence in the City of Irvine.During his brief tenure of service here at USC, Officer Lawrence proved to be an honorable, compassionate and professional member of our department and the Trojan Family.  We are a better department and the USC Campus Community is a safer place as a result of his service.Please continue to espouse those same values of honor, commitment to duty, professionalism and compassion as we continue to add to his legacy and those that we all share as members of the law enforcement/public safety community.I would also ask that you remember Keith and his fiancée’s families in your thoughts and prayers as they grieve and begin the healing process and move forward from this tragic loss of their loved ones.”last_img read more

Health Workers’ ‘Safe Haven’ Dedicated

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and United States Ambassador to Liberia Deborah Malac have dedicated a state-of-the-art 25-bed Ebola field hospital constructed in Charlesville, Margibi County, by the United States Department of Defense (DoD) to provide care to healthcare workers, both international and Liberian, who may be infected with the Ebola virusKnown as the Monrovia Medical Unit (MMU), the facility would be considered as a safe haven for healthcare workers in the country who are on the frontlines of the fight against Ebola. The construction of the field hospital was financed by the American Government and implemented jointly by the U.S. military and the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL).The dedication ceremony of the facility was held in Charlesville, near the Roberts International Airport in Margibi County last Wednesday, November 5, 2015. The MMU, which is primarily for healthcare workers as well as the 4,000 U.S troops expected to be deployed in the country, is in addition to 17 Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) that are under construction across the country as a result of the U.S. intervention in Liberia.The facility is being staffed by a team of specialized officers from the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps, which is playing an integral role in the overall US government response. The USPHS Commissioned Corps is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf joined U.S. Ambassador Deborah Malac to dedicate the newly constructed 25-bed field hospital to be used solely for the treatment of healthcare workers who may become infected by the Ebola virus disease.Speaking during the ceremony, President Sirleaf said the hospital represents a major contribution in the fight against the virus in Liberia.  It also represents a true spirit of partnership between both governments.“This facility represents a major contribution to the country’s fight against the further spread of the deadly Ebola virus disease that has hit our country so hard. This represents a true spirit of partnership and leaves hope for a structure that will enable Liberians fare for themselves when the partners shall have left after Ebola.”She described the US government as a partner who recognizes and responds to the needs of the Liberian people and that the fruit of the partnership reaches out to the people it is meant to benefit.President Sirleaf lauded healthcare workers for their sacrificial services to the country and its people by confronting a disease they knew very little about.  She expressed happiness that those healthcare workers who may be infected can now receive quality care and treatment with a high hope of survival.She also lauded the American government and people for coming to the aid of Liberia at a time when international response to the Ebola crisis was at its lowest ebb.  She expressed the hope that the country is well on its way to beating back the further spread of the disease.The Liberian leader noted that Liberians themselves are the main force preventing the further spread of the deadly virus, due to their adherence to measures announced by the Government, and for supporting all the measures meant to tackle the further spread of the disease.Ambassador Malac, said the current role of the U.S. Government in Liberia’s fight against Ebola, including the construction of the treatment facility, is a symbol of the strong U.S.-Liberia relations and partnership.“The U.S. is proud to be supporting Liberia and it is expected that our support will go further than the emergency period and interventions. I am glad that healthcare workers who may fall sick to Ebola can now get quality treatment right here in Liberia,” the Ambassador emphasized.She indicated that Liberia had made progress and will continue to make progress in the fight against Ebola until the virus is finally eradicated from the country. She thanked the AFL and Liberians in general for their cooperation with the U.S. and other partners working in Liberia.Since the outbreak of the virus, health workers have been the hardest hit with over 70 falling prey to the disease. These include Medical Doctors, Physician Assistants and Nurses. The construction of this facility, though it may be considered belated, will serve as a ‘safe haven,’ for these health workers who are still on the frontlines and dedicating their lives to the service of humanity.Providing an overview of the facility, the Acting U.S.  Deputy Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Scott F. Giberson, noted that the MMU is multifunctional and was reconfigured to meet the mission requirements specific to infectious disease treatment in Liberia.“Although this is a clinical care unit, not usually intended for an infectious pathogen, the DoD and the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps worked in partnership to reconfigure the facility to function as an Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU).“In addition, experts from Medecin Sans Frontieres (MSF) were consulted on the reconfiguration, illuminating the multi-sector approach in support of the U.S. Embassy in Monrovia and the United States Agency for International Development Ebola Disaster Assistance Response Team, which is overseeing the overall U.S.  Ebola response in the region,” he said.Admiral Giberson said seventy officers, with diverse clinical and public health backgrounds, will bring safety and security to the brave men and women who are serving as frontlines heroes, and continue efforts of USAID, DoD, the government of Liberia and international partners to build capacity for additional care in the country.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more