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Governor Wolf Praises Continued Use of Easton Plant for MLB Manufacturing

first_imgGovernor Wolf Praises Continued Use of Easton Plant for MLB Manufacturing April 04, 2017 Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release,  Results Easton, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today joined Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred and others to announce the continued use of Majestic’s Easton plant to manufacturer apparel for the MLB by Fanatics and Under Armour. This morning, VF Corporation announced that it was selling Majestic to Fanatics.“For more than a decade, if you watched a MLB game anywhere in the country, apparel made in Pennsylvania was proudly on display, and today’s announcement affirms that the proud tradition of making MLB apparel will continue in the Lehigh Valley,” Governor Wolf said. “The continued use of the Majestic facility is important news for the commonwealth, the region and the talented employees who are true baseball fans with a genuine pride in what they do. I want to thank everyone involved for working so hard to preserve this storied tradition in the Lehigh Valley that contributes to the treasure of our national pastime.”Today in Easton, Governor Wolf also joined Fanatics Owner and Executive Chairman Michael Rubin, Majestic President Mike Pardini, Attorney General Josh Shapiro and workers from the facility.In November 2016, Governor Wolf wrote Commissioner Manfred to request the opportunity to make the pitch on keeping MLB manufacturing in Pennsylvania and the two spoke by phone earlier this year. The governor today thanked the Commissioner, along with Fanatics, Majestic and Under Armour, for their continued commitment to Pennsylvania.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Tougher law to protect children hailed

first_imgStuff.co.nz 7 Dec 2011Child advocates are hailing new laws giving sweeping powers to prosecute all those turning a blind eye to assaults on the very young. The Crimes Amendment Act (No3) becomes law on March 19 and will allow police to charge everyone in a household with failing to protect a child. The maximum sentence is 10 years’ jail. The new law comes as a result of the public outcry following the murder of the Kahui twins for which no-one has been held responsible after a jury acquitted the twins’ father. However, the extended family’s infamous “code of silence” was typical of such cases, pediatricians say. In Taranaki, a serious assault of a 14-month-old, who suffered a fractured skull, was dropped last month for lack of evidence.Starship children’s hospital paediatrician Patrick Kelly welcomes the law which allows everyone in a house where the abuse took place to be charged. The message is that they should have protected the abused child. “If you can’t determine which of the adults in the house did it you charge all of them – or none of them.” However, the law change should have gone further, he said. The code of silence within families was an issue throughout the world. In Britain, the same “failing to protect” law was implemented but went further to limit the right to silence. “The UK has shown it’s possible to modify the law. For some reason New Zealand did not follow through with changing the right to silence.”http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/6097019/Tougher-law-to-protect-children-hailedlast_img read more