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Judy Kuhn Will Join Cast of Fiddler on the Roof

first_img Fiddler on the Roof View Comments Related Shows Judy Kuhncenter_img Tony nominee Judy Kuhn will step into the Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof, taking over for Jessica Hecht as Golde beginning November 22. The revival, helmed by Bartlett Sher and starring Danny Burstein, will play its final performance at the Broadway Theatre on December 31.Kuhn earned her fourth Tony nomination for her performance as Helen Bechdel in Fun Home, which concluded its Broadway run on September 10. She also received nominations for She Loves Me—Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick’s predecessor to Fiddler—Les Miserables and Chess. Her additional Broadway credits include The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Rags and King David on stage and the singing voice of Pocahantas in the 1995 Disney animated film.In addition to Hecht and Burstein, the current cast of Fiddler on the Roof includes Alexandra Silber as Tzeitel, Samantha Massell as Hodel, Melanie Moore as Chava, Adam Kantor as Motel, Ben Rappaport as Perchik, Nick Rehberger as Fyedka, Adam Dannheisser as Lazar Wolf, Alix Korey as Yente and Dee Roscioli as Fruma Sarah.Hecht will next appear on Broadway in the Roundabout revival of Arthur Miller’s The Price, beginning performances at the American Airlines Theatre on February 16, 2017. Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 31, 2016last_img read more

Student success

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaWith getting children ready for school, feeding them a healthy breakfast, making sure they get home safely and taking them to practices, today’s parents have a lot on their plates.Actual schoolwork can get lost in the rush. A key to children’s success is paying attention to what goes on during the eight hours they spend at school.“I came across a recent survey in one state that said fewer than 20 percent of parents are in regular contact with their child’s school and teacher,” said Don Bower, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension human development specialist. “Nobody is happy with that.”As teachers and schools search for ways to engage their students, sometimes the one missing element is parental involvement. Eighth-grade teacher Julie Crow said the best way a parent can connect with a child’s teachers is to show up at parent-teacher conferences.“We make a lot of appointments, and I bet about 60 percent of them don’t show up,” she said.Crow teaches mathematics at East Jackson Middle School in Commerce, Ga. Parents there can also meet with teachers when they pick up their child’s report card.“It seems like a lot of parents come when their child is in sixth grade,” she said. “But by the time they get to eighth grade, not as many parents come.”When students reach middle school, Bower said, many parents tend to believe their student is more independent and responsible. In fact, parents may need to be in closer contact with their child’s teacher during these challenging years, he said.“In middle school and high school, students have issues of bigger crowds and less one-to-one contact,” he said. “Typically at the middle school level, many parents are overwhelmed with trying to meet all the teachers and keep up with what’s going on in all those classes.”Bower said a solution to the teacher overload would be for a parent to find someone at the school who knows the child and to talk to that person regularly.“The most effective systems are where both the school and the parent understand the learning goals of the student and work together to achieve those goals,” he said. “That’s done in an environment where responsibility and power are shared between the school and the parents.”Sometimes, parents doubt the necessity of parent-teacher conferences, he said.“For some, it informs them of a situation to begin with,” Crow said. “So many parents don’t know what’s happening in their kids’ lives. For some parents, the conference doesn’t do anything. For others, it goes home and lights a fire.”Bower and Crow offer these tips on what parents can do to communicate with their child’s teachers.1. Use the Web. “More than 95 percent of schools now have their own Web sites,” Bower said. “Using the Web also makes it much easier, especially for parents gone during traditional hours.” Web use could include something as common as e-mail. However, many schools now post a student’s password-protected grades and homework online.2. Call. “The old standby is telephone contact between the parent and teacher,” Bower said. “Make sure to call during the teacher’s free period if the teacher has one. Parents need to understand when it’s a good time to reach the teacher.” Teachers generally only have about an hour and a half per day to call a parent back as well as complete other projects, Crow said.3. Ask the child about homework assignments, tests and notes from the teacher. Talk to your student. “I think parents need to do more than just meet with their student’s teachers at conferences,” Crow said, “even if it’s not necessarily to talk to me more, but talking to their kids more.”last_img read more

Education Ministry rules burning incident as accidental

first_imgDavid Rose Special SchoolFollowing an investigation after a teacher of the David Rose Special School was accused of injuring a student of the institution, the Education Ministry has ruled that the incident was an accident.Guyana Times published an article on Wednesday in which the mother of an eight-year-old child attending the institution accused the teachers of abusing her child.The woman alleged that about two weeks ago, her son came home with a burn on his hand. Upon questioning him, she was told that he was burnt by the teachers. As such, she lodged several complaints at the Welfare Department.After the article was published, the Education Ministry, in a statement, said it wasThe child’s burnt handaware of the incident and the matter was investigated.According to the Ministry along with an investigation, a meeting was conducted through engagements with the Special Education Needs Officers, teachers of the David Rose Special School, the parents of the child, welfare officers and representatives of the Guyana Teachers Union (GTU).The Ministry stated that the incident involved a glue gun and was not a deliberate act but rather an accident.“The incident with the glue gun was an accident and not as a result of any deliberate wrongdoing of the teacher. The teachers were cautioned about being even more careful when using these kinds of equipment around pupils.”Meanwhile, a number of conclusions emerged from the discussions, which indicated that an arrangement was agreed upon to have the parents and the teachers meet once per week, so as to become acquainted with the intervention strategies to foster a better teacher-parent relationship. Also, the teachers will have an opportunity to become aware of the parents’ strategies for dealing with the child.Additionally, staff development sessions are scheduled to be held with teachers of the school on building teacher-parent relationships. At the meeting, the child’s parent and teachers were also made aware of their roles and responsibilities in this process.“The Ministry will never condone any behaviour that puts the nation’s children in harm’s way and will ensure that the school is a very safe space for our future leaders,” the statement on Wednesday further noted.The mother of the child told this publication that her son went home on three occasions and demonstrated to her what two teachers would normally do to him. He claimed that he was hit to the head and mouth with a stick.Only recently, the woman alleged that another teacher attached to the institution saw her and told her of all the instances her child was abused by the other teachers. She also mentioned that the teacher told her that the complaints made by her autistic child were true.When Guyana Times had contacted the headteacher, Dionne McKenzie, for a comment, she refused to speak and subsequently hung up the telephone.last_img read more