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Mazel Tov! Our Five Favorite High School Productions of Fiddler

first_img View Comments The RICHest “Rich Man” We searched from sunrise to sunset for our favorite high school Tevyes, and Wesley David Toledo in the 2011 Christ Presbyterian Academy (you read that right) production in Tennessee gets top marks. He starts off relatively subdued, and grows increasingly animated throughout the signature number. How else can you “cheep,” “quack,” or “ya ha deedle deedle bubba bubba deedle deedle dum”? Happy Fiddler week! L’Chaim! L’shanah tovah, all, and mazel tov to Fiddler on the Roof on its 50th anniversary! In honor of the momentous occasion, we’ve been bringing you all things Fiddler this week: from crazy facts, to Fran Drescher as Fruma Sarah to some Yiddish rapping, to Tevyes around the world. Now, we’re grabbing our backpacks and going back to school. Check out our favorite high school renditions of “Tradition,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I Were a Rich Man” and more below. And start rehearsing your bottle dance, because Fiddler is aiming a Great White Way return in the 2015-16 season! Best Ensemble How many times in high school did you hear “there are no such things as small parts, only small actors,” or some variation of the sort? Well the ensemble of Summit High School’s 2008 production took that to heart, and ended up taking home the “Outstanding Chorus” award at Paper Mill Playhouse’s Rising Star Awards in New Jersey. After watching their “Tradition,” it’s clear why. The harmonies! That synchronization! Those beards! The Papa, the Mama, the son, the daughter: they’re all there.center_img Most Daring Jr. High School Production In 1969, a junior high school in Brownsville, Brooklyn put on a production of Fiddler on the Roof; a rarity, not just because the original Broadway production was still running a few miles up, but also because the cast featured predominantly black and Puerto Rican students. During a time of tensions between the African American and Jewish divide in the neighborhood, the students proved that the ideas of soul, community and yes, tradition, are universal. Take a look at a 60 Minutes segment on the production. Freakiest Fruma Sarah Dry ice? Check. Spooky lighting? Check. Rolling in on a giant contraption and wheeled around the stage? Check and check. Here’s Amy Rachel as the butcher’s first wife in Salem Hills High School’s 2011 production in Utah, complete with all the crazy vibrato and head voice you could ever ask for. Sure, the makeup is half Fiddler and half Cats, but that kind of makes her Frumah Sarah all the more terrifying. The Daughters! The Daughters! Tradition! The Class of 2007 girls of New Canaan High School in Connecticut are looking for someone interesting, well-off and important. Fans of belting a plus. We were hooked once we heard this Hodel’s little scoop on “Find me a find.” And props to the pint-sized Tzeitel’s hilarious Yente impersonation. And why not throw Shprintze and Bielke into the mix? More harmony!last_img read more

Men’s Hockey: Sitting down with star freshman Alex Turcotte

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s ice hockey team (7-10-1, 2-7-1-1 Big Ten) is having a rough go at the dish lately, losing in several underwhelming performances. Despite having a record under .500, they remain one of the nation’s top and most exciting programs. Part of this success? Wisconsin’s highly-recruited freshman center, Alex Turcotte.Turcotte was drafted with the fifth overall pick in the 2019 National Hockey League Entry Draft by the Los Angeles Kings and stands as the third-highest selected Badger in the NHL Draft in school history.Men’s Hockey: Badgers NHL draftees set to take off in freshman seasonFollowing an NHL Draft that featured four Badgers, the University of Wisconsin squad is loaded with young talent. Alex Turcotte, Read…The 5-foot-11, left-handed, 180-pound centerman from Island Lake, Illinois, has had a terrific freshman season through 14 games, scoring over a point-per-game on average. He is a top contributer for the Badgers in points (15), goals (6), assists (9) and powerplay goals (4).He was one of four Badgers to be drafted in the 2019 NHL Draft, others being freshmen Cole Caufield, Owen Lindmark and Ryder Donovan. These four have all played together on different U.S. National teams prior to this season. Turcotte described how going to school, practicing and playing with these three has created a tight bond between them.“That’s where we became best friends,” Turcotte said. “Having that encouragement has been great and it’s like another support piece. You get to lean on guys like that because you’re going through the same thing as them, so it’s been great.”While his friends and teammates have been extremely supportive of him, nothing has served as more of a support piece to Turcotte than his dad, Alfie Turcotte, who was drafted 17th overall in the 1983 NHL Entry Draft by the Montreal Canadiens.Alex discussed his feeling on being drafted twelve spots higher than Alfie.“He’d always kind of chirp me about it,” Alex said. “It was all fun and games, so I kind of jab him back a little bit now.”Even with some playful jabs, the relationship between the two is purely loving.Turcotte was enthusiastic about the amount of support his father has given him, as it has helped him become the player and man he is today.“I’m here and I am who I am today because of him,” Turcotte said of his father. “He’s definitely been the biggest influence in my life on and off the ice, so he’s been a great supporting piece.”Alex has had a tremendous impact on the Badgers’ offensive success this season, but it is not just him carrying the load. Wisconsin’s freshmen as a whole have been the glue of the team and have had an enormous impact on the season thus far.Turcotte pointed out how, despite the team’s youth, most of the players are used to playing against older competition.“A lot of us [freshmen] played juniors, so we played against older guys when we were younger than them, so we kind of have some of that experience,” Turcotte said. “It’s still a big adjustment. Even from the USA team to here … we can always improve and definitely have a lot of things to work on.”Another adjustment for Turcotte has been playing in front of a larger crowd at the Kohl Center as opposed to playing in front of the crowd at the U.S. National team games. Yet, this has been a relatively smooth transition for him despite the daunting nature of the task.Men’s hockey: Wisconsin’s overloaded 2019-20 freshmen class is its best in yearsThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team recently landed a surplus of talent in their 2019 freshman class. The incoming Read…Though Turcotte has had a great experience playing for the Badgers this season, his decision to play came as a result of choosing not to play for the Kings. This was a huge decision for someone who has been surrounded by hockey his entire life.His reasoning, however, was not related to avoiding his inevitable leap to play professional hockey, but rather because of his relationships with current Badger teammates. “Just the guys that are here, a lot are really great teammates, and going with Cole and Owen — it was an easy decision,” Turcotte said. Even with this decision, Turcotte is aware that his NHL jump is looming, and he acknowledged that getting stronger and more prepared for the NHL is a major factor on his mind. Moving forward, improvements can come in numerous ways for Turcotte. This means improving his goal scoring, shooting and 200-foot game in order to bring these attributes to Los Angeles, where there already lies an elite 200-foot centerman and one of Turcotte’s favorite players, Anže Kopitar.“As far as goal scoring goes, just scoring from different areas on the ice, but using my shot more,” Turcotte said. “I’m more of a playmaker, so I think using my shot can be a dual threat. I know what I can do offensively, but I think you want to be out there in all situations, and in order to do that, you need to have a good 200-foot game.”To develop his 200-foot game, Turcotte strives to be more relied on defensively, and to improve his faceoff percentage.Men’s Hockey: Inconsistencies continue to plague Wisconsin against MinnesotaThe No. 19 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (6-7-1, 1-4-1-1 Big Ten) struggled immensely against the University of Minnesota Read…His ability to develop as a player has changed drastically over time, as he had to find ways to succeed against players who were much bigger, stronger and older. “When you’re a kid, it’s a lot more separated on talent and you can kind of get away with it if you are more talented, but then ever since the U.S. teams and college … there’s not that much of a difference from each player,” Turcotte said.The sudden even playing field has caused Turcotte to work much harder than he ever had before.Turcotte explained that playing in college has required an adjustment period, but he feels that the high level of competition is crucial to his career.“I think just working hard and trying to get better every day can really go a long way because there’s not much separation from guys,” Turcotte said. “Everyone’s a lot older and physically more mature, and, especially in college, there’s 25-year-olds. That’s crazy. I’m 18, so playing against guys that are way older, I can only help and see how much of a physical advantage they have, but you have to adapt, and it can only make you better.”Men’s Hockey: Crease Creatures craziest student section in hockeyThe No. 7 University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team (4-2-0, 0-0-0 Big Ten) has impressed in a major way through Read…Next time you’re at a Badger hockey game, watch out for No. 15 on the ice, as he may be an NHL star in the making.last_img read more