first_imgOne of the underlying causes responsible for the constant student unrests on the campuses of the University of Liberia and other higher institutions of learning in the country has been attributed to political interferences, according to Prof. Geegbae A. Geegbae, Dean of the Business College of the University of Liberia.The Economics Professor said political interferences in terms of admissions, mobilization of youth to get involved in politics at the expense of their studies have serious repercussions for education. He also stated that these constant unwholesome actions on the part of student prolong their stay on campuses.Though Prof. Geegbae failed to delve further into the nitty-gritty of the political interferences, our reporter said it has been established in time past that external political factors from some officials of government have led students to stage riots in the so-called name of advocating for social-justice for the ‘voiceless masses.’Prof. Geegbae made the assertions when he served as guest speaker at the graduation of the over 250 participants from the 2014 cycle of the Liberia Institute of Public Administration (LIPA) over weekend.He spoke on the topic, ‘The Challenge of Providing Adequate Professional Training for Public and Private Sector Employees for Efficient Service Delivery in Liberia’s Reform Agenda: The Role of LIPA.’The UL Dean of Business College further stated that once an institution of higher learning, like the UL, shifts from an educational or professional mode to a political mode, it becomes difficult to get it back to its original state.“They set trends that are unhealthy for growth. It is important and necessary to develop norms and values that prevent political interferences in academic matters,” Prof. Geegbae said.For his part, the Executive Director of LIPA, Oblayon Blayon Nyemah, Sr., said from the background of civil service reform, the civil service has been in disarray, while patronage permeated every sector of our public life making it difficult, if not impossible to deliver efficient services to the Liberian people.He said the post-conflict government inherited a moribund civil service; personnel were ill-trained, inadequately compensated and as such de-motivated and therefore the service seized to be the main machinery of the government bureaucracy as far as service delivery is concerned.“However, the plethora of reform initiatives undertaken by the new civil service administration, complemented by the tripartite coordination of the Governance Commission and LIPA, signals a renewed commitment to reinvent the machinery of civil service bureaucracy,” Mr. Nyemah said.The conferral officer of the 2014 First Training Cycle graduates, Amb. Commany Wesseh said Liberian manpower is worrisome because poor foundation and most of them bribe their way through to get degrees.Amb. Wesseh, who is the Minister of State without Portfolio, indicated that most university graduates do not know the different between the pronoun ‘I’ and the plural ‘are.’He urged graduates of the 2014 First Training Cycle to see themselves as new servants but must stop from clerical positions instead of Assistant Ministers.“It is better to start from the foundation in your offices than Director or Assistant Ministers, because if you are sacked you won’t know a damned thing,” Mr. Wesseh said.He added: “Don’t also be a Senator as soon you finished school, it’s better to rise to any position.”Meanwhile, registration for the 2014 2nd Training Cycle is in process and would end on Monday, 4 August 2014.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img2 August 2005Two 190-million-year-old dinosaur embryos from a group of seven eggs have been identified as the oldest dinosaur embryos yet found. Discovered in South Africa, they are also the oldest known embryos for any terrestrial vertebrate – and the oldest evidence that dinosaurs were caring parents.The embryos are of an Early Jurassic prosauropod dinosaur, according to Dr Mike Raath of the Wits Bernard Price Institute for Palaeontological Research (BPI). Raath is one of five authors who describe the embryos in the 29 July 2005 isssue of leading international journal Science.“The embryos belong to the early sauropodomorph dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus,” he says. “These skeletons are quite common in South Africa and range in size from small juveniles to full adults, up to about five metres in length. This identification is a major coup, because embryos are often difficult to identify to species.”The late Professor James Kitching of the BPI discovered the cluster of eggs and their the embryos at the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the northeastern Free State in 1977.These are the oldest known dinosaur embryos. Two were exposed in the group of seven eggs. One of them is almost complete, and appears to be trapped in the act of hatching.The embryos are the oldest known for any terrestrial vertebrate, and so the oldest embryos in an amniote egg known from anywhere in the world.Since their discovery the eggs sat on a shelf in Wits University’s fossil store, awaiting someone with the necessary skill to prepare the fossil eggs for detailed study. The tiny embryonic bones are extremely delicate, and intricately curled up in the eggs.“In January 2000, Professor Robert Reisz of the University of Toronto at Mississauga in Canada was on a research visit to South Africa, and borrowed the fossil eggs to take back to Canada,” says Raath. “There Diane Scott of his lab carried out the detailed and difficult preparation under high magnification using a special microscope and achieved spectacular results.”Robert Reisz (left) with James Kitching, who discovered the fossilised dinosaur embryos in 1977 (Photo: Wits University)The growing dinosaurThe embryos provide significant insights into the growth and development of this early dinosaur. Raath explains that this discovery allowed the team to reconstruct in detail the growth trajectory of Massospondylus, from pre-hatchling to full adult – a first for any dinosaur.Reisz, the project leader, points out that adults and juveniles of other types of dinosaur are known, but they are usually either recovered from bone beds, where the skeletons are broken up, disarticulated and scattered, or the rare articulated skeletons are not sufficient to reflect a growth series.The growth trajectory of Massospondylus shows that this dinosaur started out as an awkward-looking little quadruped with had a relatively short tail, a horizontally held neck, long forelimbs and a huge head.As the animal grew, the neck grew faster than the rest of the body, but the forelimb and head grew much more slowly than the rest of the body, so the body proportions changed dramatically as the animal grew.Weird-looking animalThis means that Massospondylus changed from a tiny quadruped into a weird-looking large animal with a long neck (still held horizontally), a thick, massive tail, a very small head, short forelimbs, and long hind limbs.The result is an adult animal very different from the embryo, and probably at least partly bipedal. In other cases where embryos and adults are known, as in the hadrosaurs or duck-billed dinosaurs, such dramatic changes in body proportions are not shown.The embryos also provide clues about the origin of the quadrupedal gait of the giant sauropods (the brontosaurs) of later times, which are descendants of the prosauropods.The embryo of Massospondylus looks like a tiny sauropod with massive limbs walking on all fours. This means the quadrupedal gait of sauropods may have evolved through paedomorphosis – the retention of embryonic and juvenile features in the adult.“Some people think that humans too are products of paedomorphosis,” says Raath.Caring parentsThe absence of well-developed teeth in the two preserved embryos, which were clearly on the point of hatching, and the overall awkward body proportions suggest that the hatchlings required parental care of some kind for some time after emerging from the egg.If this interpretation is correct, it constitutes the oldest known indication of parental care in the fossil record.The embryos are about 190-million years old, from the Early Jurassic Period. Most other known dinosaur embryos are at least 100-million years younger, from the Cretaceous period of 80- to 65-million years ago.The five co-authers of the Science paper are Professor Robert Reisz, Diane Scott, David Evans, Dr Hans-Dieter Sues, and Dr Mike Raath.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgAcclaimed South African actress Terry Pheto has won an award at the UK National Film Awards for her role in A United Kingdom.Terry Pheto wins the Best Supporting Actress award at the UK National Film Awards in London on 29 March 2017 for her role in A United Kingdom. (Image: Ana M Wiggins, Screengrab via Terry Pheto’s Instagram)Brand South Africa reporterSouth African actress Terry Pheto has added another accolade to her impressive acting career. Her latest win is the Best Supporting Actress award at the UK National Film Awards in London on 29 March 2017.Pheto won the award for her role as Naledi Khama in the movie, A United Kingdom.“Truly honoured and humbled by this incredible accolade,” the star wrote on her Instagram account. “Thank you #NationalFilmAwardsUK for the recognition.”Congrats to @TerryPheto voted #BestSupportingActress sponsored by @FIJIWater at the 3rd annual #NationalFilmAwardsUK pic.twitter.com/oKAazfRJjK— National Film Awards (@NATFilmAwards) April 3, 2017WINNER of #NationalFilmAwardsUK BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS award for #AUnitedKingdom @TerryPheto pic.twitter.com/STZcDu7x2j— Thula Sindi (@thulasindi) March 29, 2017A United KingdomThe movie, a biographical romantic drama, tells the story of the interracial marriage of Sir Seretse Khama and Ruth Williams Khama, played by David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike, respectively.Watch:When the movie was released, Pheto told the Sowetan newspaper that it was an honour to work with such established actors.“To feature amongst the calibre of actors and actresses cast for this film and have my talent recognised by international casting agents and producers is humbling.“I’ve been an actor for 13 years now and every day I work on honing my craft and becoming a better actress and to get jobs such as this one definitely proves hard work pays off,” Terry said.Victory celebratedHer win was celebrated on social media platforms, with congratulatory messages flooding Pheto’s timeline.@thulasindi @TerryPheto Congratulations Ms Pheto!!??Continuously flying the SA black excellence flag high, thank you— Masechaba Mtolo (@uMaMoshoeshoe) March 29, 2017@TerryPheto waving the South African up high… Congratulations on your award sisi!!! You are making us proud ??? #Queen— Herman Radipabe (@RamsRaddy) March 29, 2017@TerryPheto Congratulations Terry. Well done. You deserve it all. ???— IG: Sibu_Nk (@Bozoom_Nk) March 29, 2017Congratulations @TerryPheto. As you let your star shine without limits you are permitting girls and young women in Africa to do the same. https://t.co/wnh0Vfxinb— Adv Thuli Madonsela (@ThuliMadonsela3) March 30, 2017@TerryPheto congratulations on your big award. You had star quality since the very first time I met you.— Marianne Fassler (@Leopardfrock) March 30, 2017Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the dairy industry supports a two-step process to roll back the existing Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) regulation and generate a new policy that provides farmers greater certainty in the future.NMPF has supported efforts by the Trump Administration since January to restart the regulatory process behind the controversial 2015 Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule. NMPF provided comments today to EPA in support of rescinding the 2015 rule so the agency can initiate a new regulatory process defining and regulating groundwater sources. The agency has been soliciting comments on the WOTUS revision process during the past two months.“A fresh start and a more reasonable approach that complies with past Supreme Court rulings will be in the best interests of the environment and dairy farmers,” said Jamie Jonker, NMPF vice president for sustainability and scientific affairs, in comments to EPA.  “We are committed to working with the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to find effective ways to protect America’s water supplies.”Rescinding the 2015 policy — which is currently not being enforced because an appeals court suspended it last year, pending the outcome of several lawsuits — is the first step in a two-part process. In the forthcoming second step, EPA will need to propose a new rule that conforms to the various Supreme Court cases impacting definitions for what is considered a water of the U.S.  In NMPF’s letter to EPA, Jonker said that EPA and the Army Corps will need to correct the ambiguity resulting from the 2015 rule’s lack of clarity on key terms and definitions, such as “adjacent,” “floodplain” and “significant nexus.”“The agencies’ new notice-and-comment rulemaking needs to provide dairy farmers with certainty as to what constitutes navigable waters of the United States by clearly complying with the Supreme Court decisions,” NMPF wrote. “We look forward to working with you in the future for the proper clarity that dairy farmers need on WOTUS to continue to meet our shared commitment to clean water,” NMPF wrote.last_img read more

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, oneill@aesop.rutgers.eduSaving money is a frequent topic of conversation for service members during the month of February. Between the receipt of tax refunds by early filers, the America Saves and Military Saves campaigns run by the Consumer Federation of America, and the Save Your Refund contest, many people are promoting savings.The Military Families Learning Network is sponsoring a free webinar called Savings Strategies for Military Families on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 11 a.m. ET. The webinar will cover reasons for saving money, including peace of mind and to have cash available for emergencies and future financial goals.To calculate how much savings is required to achieve a financial goal, divide the amount needed by the time (e.g., number of months) available to save. For example, if you want to save $5,000 by next year, you’ll need to put aside $416.67 ($5,000 divided by 12) a month, or $96.15 ($5,000 divided by 52) a week. Use this worksheet to develop a savings plan.Many people say, “There’s no way I can save any money!” However, later, they find that they can save when they really put their minds to it. Below are seven saving strategies to get started:Pay Yourself First (PYF) – Make saving an “expense” in your spending plan, just like rent or loan payments. To make PYF easy, automate savings through an employer credit union or retirement savings plan or through monthly transfers from a checking account to a savings account or money market fund.Continue Paying A Loan – If you’re about to pay off a car loan or student loan, continue making the same monthly payment – to yourself! You are already used to making this payment so you won’t feel deprived.Bank A Windfall – Whenever you receive unexpected money – an inheritance, bingo winnings, retroactive pay, an insurance dividend, etc. – put at least part of it into savings.Save “Extra” Paychecks – If you are paid bi-weekly, in two months of each year you will receive three paychecks. Employees who are paid weekly will receive an “extra” check in four months of each year. The months vary with each year’s calendar and the day on which you are paid. Save at least part of this money.Save Coupon Money – Set aside the amount you “save” by using coupons at a supermarket or drugstore. Your cash register receipt will indicate the amount that was saved. If you save $20 a week using coupons, put the “savings” (the money you did not spend) into savings account. That’s over $1,000 over the course of a year!Collect Loose Change – Empty out your pockets and wallet and put loose change in a jar. Then periodically deposit the change into a savings account. Studies show that over three-quarters of Americans have a stash of loose change and over half of Americans add to it regularly.Break an Expensive Habit – Every time you don’t buy a donut at coffee break or spend money in a vending machine, save the money you didn’t spend. Ditto for fancy coffee, lottery tickets, and other money “nibblers.”Successful savers develop a spending plan (budget), include savings for emergencies and future financial goals as fixed “expenses,” and automate savings deposits so they don’t require ongoing self-control, Remember that small steps matter. If you want to save $1,000 in a year, pay attention to where nickels and dimes go every day. For more information about saving money, visit AmericaSaves.org.last_img read more

first_imgTerming the Congress as “irrelevant and obsolete”, former chief minister of Chhattisgarh Ajit Jogi on Sunday dismissed suggestions that he was the B team of the BJP and said he would contest against incumbent Raman Singh and his party in the upcoming elections in the state.“Had I been B team I would not be contesting election from Rajnandgaon (the chief minister’s constituency). Had I been B team I would have not faced a baseless case of murder. There should not have been a false case of dacoity against me. My son faced charges of hatching a conspiracy to murder. Had I been B team this all would not have happened,” he told PTI in an interview here.Mr. Jogi said it was his faith in the judiciary that all these baseless charges were dropped against him and his son.He said that a ‘mahagathbandhan’ was needed for the 2019 general election, but not for the Assembly polls due in the State later this year.To a question whether the proposed alliance of the BSP and the Congress would be detrimental to his party, the former bureaucrat-turned-politician said such a coalition has not yet materialised and that his party would assess the situation once such a situation emerges.“See whether the (BSP-Congress) coalition would happen or not, it (future course of action) will be decided only then. There may be some gains and losses. But, whenever such a coalition take place then we will assess this. As of today, we are contesting all seats in the elections,” Mr. Jogi said.Criticising both the Congress and the BJP for being run from Delhi, he said what Chhattisgarh needs today is a State-centric approach.There is no opposition to the Congress, except the fact that it is a national party and all its decisions are taken in Delhi, he said. “We want that Chhattisgarh should get solutions to all its problem within the state itself,” Mr. Jogi said.He said that his main opposition is the BJP. “The Congress is both obsolete and irrelevant in the state. They do not have any leader. They do not have any direction. Our fight is with the BJP,” said Mr. Jogi, who was for long associated with the Congress before leaving it in 2016. He later formed his own party.Mr. Jogi said he would contest the polls against Chhattisgarh Chief Minister Raman Singh from his own Rajnadgaon constituency.last_img read more

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With: STEPHEN KING’S THE STAND FILMING IN VANCOUVER THIS FALL/WINTERA new 10-episode adaption of Stephen King’s The Stand from CBS All Access is filming in Vancouver this Fall/Winter.Filming dates: September 16th to March 11th.Working Title: Radio Nowhere. EVERYTHING WE KNOW ABOUT STEPHEN KING’S NEW THE STAND SERIES SO FARStephen King’s The Stand is heading back to the small screen — this time, with a 10-episode streaming series coming to CBS All Access.King’s 1978 novel is one of his most popular titles ever and centers on a group of survivors who have managed to make it through the catastrophic plague that cost the other 99 percent of the world their lives, but which must still contend with Randall Flagg a.k.a. the Dark Man.CBS All Access announced a straight-to-series order for The Stand in January 2019, which marks the first time the story has been adapted since 1994, when it debuted as a four-episode miniseries on ABC. The new take on The Stand has since begun to take shape, so to keep you up to speed with everything ahead for this eerie apocalyptic series, here’s a look at everything we know about The Stand so far. READ MORETHE STAND TV SERIES WILL START SHOOTING IN SEPTEMBERDetails on the latest TV adaptation of Stephen King’s The Stand are still a mystery, but at least we now know production is set to begin in just a few months.It’s happening: The Stand is getting another TV adaptation, this time thanks to CBS All Access. Stephen King’s post-apocalyptic novel was adapted for the small screen back in 1994 as a four-part miniseries starring Molly Ringwald, Gary Sinise and Rob Lowe, among many others (like Stephen King, John Landis, and Sam Raimi). READ MOREcenter_img Facebook Cast: James Marsden, Amber Heard, Whoopi Goldberg, Greg Kinnear , Odessa Young, Henry Zaga. READ MORE Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more